Hardinge lathe front set screw dial locking design
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default Hardinge lathe front set screw dial locking design

    Does anyone have a diagram or video showing the details of the front locking assembly to zero and lock the crossfeed dial? (as opposed to the common set screw on the face of the dial).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Dayton, Oh
    Posts
    1,458
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    27

    Default

    Your question is unclear to me. There is no cross-slide lock for the HLV-H at all. There used to be a fella that made and sold such a lock on ebay - I haven't seen it for a while. The dial system uses a screw with a knurled knob on the end to adjust the "drag" between the dial and the actual cross-slide shaft. Inside the bore that the knurled screw enters is a nylon plug. The screw never actually makes contact with the inner drum. All the screw does is sets the preload or drag.The nylon pellet is the actual interface/contact point between the dial and the shaft. I hope that makes sense. I could probably find a picture if I searched long enough. BTW, Hardinge doesn't know what a "common setscrew" is. Even when they use setscrews, it is very common for them to have a locking setscrew on top of it. Sometimes the locking screw has a whole through it, and sometimes they don't. If you get a part number and price that screw with the knurled knob, you'll know what I mean. The part number for the nylon pellet is U 0010245 and Hardinge will sell it to you for $27 plus tax & shipping. Here's a link to that part in the "Candy Store": ShopHardinge - U 0010245

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    13,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    780
    Likes (Received)
    4475

    Default

    I have many sizes of round hollow punches, mostly used for cutting holes in gaskets or leather. One of them is just right to make that tiny dot of thin plastic for the dial lock. I used a plastic (maybe Delrin) washer from a plumbing thing for material and it worked fine. I had no idea how much money I saved by not getting it from Hardinge.

    Larry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    It's a DIAL lock not a cross slide lock. Most dials are locked via a thumb screw on top that radially applies friction to the crossfeed shaft. This interferes with readability of the graduations which is why I want it on the front of the dial mechanism. I did see a video of one but cannot find it now, as I remember , it consisted of a cam and wedge shaped 1/2 moon piece inside the dial.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,966
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    1165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I have many sizes of round hollow punches, mostly used for cutting holes in gaskets or leather. One of them is just right to make that tiny dot of thin plastic for the dial lock. I used a plastic (maybe Delrin) washer from a plumbing thing for material and it worked fine. I had no idea how much money I saved by not getting it from Hardinge.

    Larry
    I get out my inspection x10 lens and turn a small coin of white HDPE. Works good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    5,966
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    113
    Likes (Received)
    1165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martik777 View Post
    Does anyone have a diagram or video showing the details of the front locking assembly to zero and lock the crossfeed dial? (as opposed to the common set screw on the face of the dial).
    If you are referring to a problem I continually have. Getting that front nut on the dial cover just right so that the shaft is locked to the dial. That is, when the crank
    on the outside end of the shaft is turned, there is no loss of motion to the dial. It turns smoothly. I wish I knew the trick. When I fiddle with it and it eventually
    works correctly, I just leave it alone. This happens on both dials. Before adjustment a good cleaning operation should be done. Can't hurt and has appeared to make my
    progress in the guess work go faster.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •