Hardinge Reeves pulley disassembly question?
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  1. #1
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    Default Hardinge Reeves pulley disassembly question?

    1. It's easy to remove the Reeves pulley and axle from the lathe. Done by remove the retaining clips on each end of the pulley frame.

    2. Then the collars on each end are removed with a pin wrench.

    3. The axle has a key and the pulleys look like they are positioned onto the key way. So they should slide off. Well, they don't. Is this going to be a soak and wait routine until some part becomes loose?

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    Don't know about Hardinge, but other Reeves set-ups will leave a burr on the shaft. Kinda like the cylinder ridge you see on gas engines, but opposite. Make sense?
    JR

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    Both sides are the same. A collar screws onto the outside thread and held with a set screw. The key slot on the top wheel and bottom wheel are both at 6 o'clock position. Appears to be a press fit. My question is can it be pressed apart or was it made to stay together for life.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dsc_0968.jpg  

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    Consider yourself lucky. My 1952 HLV (no -H) has got the ends welded up and I'm going to have to machine it to disassemble it and re-make it to put it together again. I suspect that the design was changed the first time Hardinge got a repair case in!

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    It doesn't look like I'm going to get this thing apart. Otherwise I could measure the pieces and take a few pictures for you.

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    My HLV-H is just like rons. After removing the threaded collar on one end, I was able to pull that side of the pulley off without issue. I could not budge the threaded collar on the end with my pin wrench so I left it. As I recall, after getting the one end off, the center part of the sheave slid off and I was able to accomplish what I took it apart for.

    My HLV is built like Mark's. One end was loose when I got it and I can see the remnants of silver braze that held them together. My plan (it's currently in parts) is to re-braze it though I'm concerned about being able to braze it without getting some wobble on that pulley flange. I agree with Mark that it's a poor design and no wonder that H changed it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim S. View Post
    My HLV-H is just like rons. After removing the threaded collar on one end, I was able to pull that side of the pulley off without issue.
    Did you accomplish the pulling with only hand strength?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim S. View Post
    My HLV is built like Mark's. One end was loose when I got it and I can see the remnants of silver braze that held them together. My plan (it's currently in parts) is to re-braze it though I'm concerned about being able to braze it without getting some wobble on that pulley flange. I agree with Mark that it's a poor design and no wonder that H changed it.
    I would not braze anything. I would make a new shaft with threads on both ends and make two collars.

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    It took more than hand strength so I used a puller. It was a light press fit and moved well before I got nervous using a two-point puller on the sheave flange.


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