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  1. #21
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    What dc servo drives would you use with an Acorn control?

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    [QUOTE=converterking;3407352]What dc servo drives would you use with an Acorn control?

    brush dc servos with encoders of at least 4000 pulses/rev work great for typical knee mill --critical component is servo drive which must accept step and direction output from Acorn board ----prices on all of these components have never been lower

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    [QUOTE=JHOLLAND1;3407359]
    Quote Originally Posted by converterking View Post
    What dc servo drives would you use with an Acorn control?

    brush dc servos with encoders of at least 4000 pulses/rev work great for typical knee mill --critical component is servo drive which must accept step and direction output from Acorn board ----prices on all of these components have never been lower
    I think you misunderstood my question. What brand dc servo drives would you use with an Acorn controller?

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    best recommendation on brand of drive is to scan Acorn user forum and determine which model/brands best fit your budget and needs

    Chinese products are constantly improving and capturing market share--many deals are available on ebay for new old stock --

    look at videos featuring Acorn and prospective drives with ease of setup/configuration

    the marketplace is quite effective in spotlighting junk and giving thumbs up to easy to install products performing as advertised

  5. #25
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    A quick update:

    I’ve got a good handle on what I’ve got now. The 4 axis servos are SEM rebranded by Centroid, with 8000 step encoders. There are limit switches on the X, Y and Z axis...not on the 4th axis though. The speed control is original Boss Bridgeport pneumatic, with one line to increase and the other to decrease. The spindle brake/lock is also pneumatically controlled.

    The control was a 2002 vintage M39, with the M400 pendant. The PO pulled the Linox era computer containing the motion control card, and the display. Presumably he/she did this to trade in to Centroid for a $600 credit on a newer system. I see no other reason for pulling the computer and motion card.

    So...I have found the Motion control card on Ebay for $800. It would need to be activated and licensed by Centroid. Centroid squirms when I ask about taking that route. They don’t think they can get everything to match up, as they are no longer working with Linox. I am having trouble reading the rep to tell if it is laziness to help or that the end product will really be inferior.

    Option 2 is the acorn. Very cheap...but then I need the drivers for the big DC servos. Total brings the cost up to about $2400. From what I can tell, the encoders on the servos would not be used. There is also a shortage of inputs and outputs, if I decide to add any cooling or oiler controls.

    Option 3 is the “Allin1DC” controller. It runs $2400, and needs another $400 for the 4th axis and $350 for a pendant. I have to supply the computer and screen. The servos drivers are built in, for an all in cost approaching $4k. This is what Centroid recommends, with a fully modern system and latest interactive software.

    I am leaning towards option 3 with the Allin1dc, although I’m still dizzy from the sticker shock. Does anyone know of an equivalent option with a lower price tag?

    Another question...I currently have no spindle encoder. This seems to only be an issue if I need to rigid thread. Centroid says rigid threading is out, and the rage is mill threading, using a 60 degree cutter. So wondered what you guys recommend...mill threading vs adding a spindle encoder for rigid tapping?

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    a few additional comments-----

    the reusable component of the M39 system is likely only the power supply--
    forget vintage board option on ebay

    acorn system includes bank of plug in relays all for $300 system cost
    wireless pendant is very good deal at $250 or so

    servo drives configured to accept Acorn step and direction signals can be purchased for $125 per axis motor--look into Leadshine or Gecko drives of rating 400 watts--affordable easy to troubleshoot with large user base

    so--for around $800 your mill should be operational in 3 axis configuration--with lots of online help for Acorn install--I removed a new all in one Centroid system from lathe and installed Acorn--no regret

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    Interesting. So loosing the encoder inputs when you changed the lathe didn’t affect performance?

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    sent you a pm

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    A followup. I ordered the Allin1dc from centroid. Kinda pricey, but sounds like the best choice capability wise, and essentially plug and play...I hope!?! I do plan to try the Acorn on the old Celtic Lathe I got, and I’ll keep that conversion more “bare bones”.

    Thank you all for the input and guidance. I’ll post a pic of the finished mill when I get it running.

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    heh.. i own V2E3-245 and im in the process of installing centroid acorn wit DMM servos...

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    The V2E3’s are pretty rare from what I’ve found! If you have a thread on your conversion I’d love the link to follow along...or let us know here how it goes.

    I spent yesterday cleaning out the old control box. It’s down to the manual line power switch, the huge transformer, and a 24 volt regulator. I have the very cheap Windows 10 computer $386 from Best Buy with $189 touch screen ready to go once the controller arrives.

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    i just saw your pictures those are centroid servos and that is a centroid control box seems like the drive boards are missing and like i said its a 600 dollar pendant .

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    How much do you want for the pendant? I have a friend looking for one.

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    PM sent...if I did it right?!?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJD View Post
    The V2E3’s are pretty rare from what I’ve found! If you have a thread on your conversion I’d love the link to follow along...or let us know here how it goes.

    I spent yesterday cleaning out the old control box. It’s down to the manual line power switch, the huge transformer, and a 24 volt regulator. I have the very cheap Windows 10 computer $386 from Best Buy with $189 touch screen ready to go once the controller arrives.
    are you making any progress with your mill ? i just purchased another one.. bridgeport series 1 with Heidenhain TNC 145 controls... just got done gutting the controls

    trying to get the shop organized and everything where it needs to be before starting these upgrades...

    a new garage door is coming next week.. then i will re-arrange all the machines.. then i will restart my builds..

    Joe

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    I’ve got the Allin1dc installed. Since I am new to CNC, it was a chore, but the fact I managed it at all says something about how easy Centroid controls are.

    The “kit” arrived as a large control board, a multi-voltage regulator, and a handful of connectors and pins...which don’t seem to fit anywhere I can see. The install was a matter of ripping out the old, with the exception of the transformer and 24 volt power supply. I also retained the main rotary manual power switch, and one of the large solenoid relays. Everything else is removed and will be on Ebay shortly.

    There are several schematics. Unfortunately, the generic mill schematic shipped with the kit, and that’s what I used for setting up. Later Josh let me know there is a Bridgeport specific schematic. He sent it in an email, along with a ton of other manuals and instructions...and I lost track of it. The differences are subtle, with the Bridgeport version mainly explaining some of the options, like spindle brakes and remote speed controls. A VFD really removes the need for the speed control.

    Installation took a full day. You just follow the schematics, one wire at a time until you finally have it all in. They recommend a bench test first, but that wasn’t an option for me, as half the components were already in the box and I didn’t plan to remove them only to re-install after the bench test. So my test was “in the box” instead. I managed to do the entire install using wire from the previous installation...and had a load of wire left over for the recycle bin.

    The manuals have pretty much all the info you need, although sometimes you can’t find it WHEN you need it. For example, it will tell you to set a parameter in the PARA menu, but they do not explain what parameter until much later in the text. I carried a list of questions for Josh, but more than half were answered later in the manual before I made my first support call. I finally hit a stop with the old rotary table and had to call before I could continue. Centroid has a remote program so they can access your controls over the internet and massage the parameters.

    My only problems remaining are concerning hardware details that have nothing to do with the CNC. I am trying to figure out how the controls on the rotary table work and how to use the old Bridgeport pneumatic controls in a useful way...like the spindle brake and speed control.

    I’ll post a more detailed update with pics once I have it all finished. Right now I am studying the software so I can start cutting metal...and decide whether to stick with the Centroid “Intercon” software or download and learn Fusion.

    One thing I was happy about is the old mill turned out to be in very good shape. I bought it on hope, since nothing could be checked without the controls operating. But now that she is “alive”, I find she has minimal wear and less than .001” backlash on all 4 axis’. Also, what looked like old rust was mostly a coating of old grungy preservative. In the end, all in I’ll have the 4 axis mill for about $4.5k. More than I had hoped, but less than it could have been.

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  21. #37
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    Excellent ! cant wait to see the finished product and making some chips !

    here are a couple videos of my bridgeports.. i have 3 in the cue for upgrading the control systems and servo motors... i plan to video the entire proscess..

    this video shows the boss and the V2E3 YouTube

    this video shows the series 1 heidenhain YouTube

    Joe

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    Very nice, Joe! I look forward to following your channel as you do the upgrades. There is very little to nothing on Utube right now concerning our old Bridgeports being CNC’d, so your the first to show it. Your V2E3 looks just like mine, with the exception of the table. Your table is shorter in the X, but wider in the Y. It also has better drainage for coolant. Hopefully between the 2 of us we can get them figured out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJD View Post
    Very nice, Joe! I look forward to following your channel as you do the upgrades. There is very little to nothing on Utube right now concerning our old Bridgeports being CNC’d, so your the first to show it. Your V2E3 looks just like mine, with the exception of the table. Your table is shorter in the X, but wider in the Y. It also has better drainage for coolant. Hopefully between the 2 of us we can get them figured out.
    i think you are looking at the boss mill .. the v2 is to the right of it... the po took the servos and mounts off and put handles on it.. i have all the original parts so ill be putting it back to its original configuration

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    Follow-up:

    I am still working on odd things, like the macros in the C code to spin the mechanical speed control up and down (purely redundant since I have the VFD, but a principal thing) and adding air valves for the rotary table clamp. BUT! I actually ran my first "job" today. I had to modify the bearing cap for my old Celtic lathe. I am still fumbling through the Intercon "conversational" software. Conversational is probably a wishful description, but I am starting to get the idea. Anyway, the part messaging went great...the old girl is back to life!

    I am still trying to decide weather to spend days studying the Intercon, or just go to Fusion 360 and put the time in there.

    The rotary table that came with the mill was blown out. I suspect someone put in hydraulic pressures to the clamp that is designed for pneumatic pressures. I did the same after the pneumatic didn't work...but I am pressty sure I would have heard 5 3/8" bolts popping their heads if I had been the one to "blow it up". New O-rings and a week of fiddling and the table is running great now...a real testament for the durability of the Haas brand.

    Thanks again to all who helped get the old girl spinning again!


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