Help identify this Hardinge part
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  1. #1
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    Default Help identify this Hardinge part

    Anybody know what this is for?

    It appears to be some sort of offset adapter.

    The handle moves the top part so the socketed hole is not inline with the axis of the shank.

    It is spring loaded, and the set screws can be adjusted to limit travel or fix the top part in position.

    I vaguely recall seeing one of these some wheres but cannot recollect what it was on.

    Steve.

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    For internal threading, or cutting a circlip groove?

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  4. #3
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    That’s for boring and recessing on a hand screw

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    Quote Originally Posted by upm2019 View Post
    That’s for boring and recessing on a hand screw
    So it sticks in a hole on the turret on a. Model like this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by upm2019 View Post
    That’s for boring and recessing on a hand screw
    That is correct it is a recessing tool. Turret mounted when used. I have one like it with out the rust.

    I take it back not the same as mine. The travel on this one appears to be derived from pivoting mine has a straight feed on a dove tail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    That is correct it is a recessing tool. Turret mounted when used. I have one like it with out the rust.

    I take it back not the same as mine. The travel on this one appears to be derived from pivoting mine has a straight feed on a dove tail.
    Yes, it pivots. Now that i know the type of lathe it was used on, i was able to do more research. I read in a thread where a guy called it a "swing tool". Another guy said recessing tool.

    Steve.

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    At the 8:52 mark in this guys video he shows it and explains its use.

    Hardinge DSM-59 - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevewatr View Post
    a guy called it a "swing tool". Another guy said recessing tool.
    Apples and oranges, both correct.

    There are several clever ways of activating spring-loaded tools on a turret lathe. "Swing" is one, and "bump" is another. Pivots and slides, basically. The activating force might be taken from a manual lever, or from pushing it against the headstock (or other fixed reference), or by pushing against it with the cross-slide.

    Not all spring-loaded turret tools are recessing tools, but most of them do have some character of "getting around behind an overhang".

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