How do you pronounce Hardinge?
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  1. #1
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    Default How do you pronounce Hardinge?

    Does it rhyme with "hinge", or with "ping"?

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    Hardinj is how I say it.

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    I used to say "Har ding ge" but was corrected to "Har dinj", rhymes with hinge, but maybe with a little tailing "eh".

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    Quote Originally Posted by awander View Post
    Does it rhyme with "hinge", or with "ping"?
    Avoid the issue. pronounce it: "overpriced"

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    If you call them you’ll hear the correct
    pronunciation when they answer the phone.

    It’s NOT Harding NOT “DING” like ding dong NO.

    It’s Har”dinge” Like in “dingy dirty”

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    Quote Originally Posted by awander View Post
    Does it rhyme with "hinge", or with "ping"?
    Hinge
    Whinge
    Binge
    Singe
    Impinge

    Ping
    Fling
    Wing
    Cling
    Exasperating

    Seems pretty obvious to me.

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    Yes, obvious to us because we've heard it for 30 or more years. Hard to know sometimes when you've only read it.

    Take Fanuc, for instance.

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    Hard minge, without the 'm'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
    Hinge
    Whinge
    Binge
    Singe
    Impinge

    Ping
    Fling
    Wing
    Cling
    Exasperating

    Seems pretty obvious to me.
    Hi Peter:

    I always thought so, too-but recently I heard someone pronounce it rhyming with "ping", and it made me think that, being someone's name, it could really be pronounced either way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Yes, obvious to us because we've heard it for 30 or more years. Hard to know sometimes when you've only read it.

    Take Fanuc, for instance.
    Funny you should mention it-that's the other one I wanted to ask about. I've heard "Fe-NOOK", and also 'FAN-ook".

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    This reminds me of Jay Leno pronouncing
    The Great “Cummins” diesel engine as
    “Cummings”.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awander View Post
    Funny you should mention it-that's the other one I wanted to ask about. I've heard "Fe-NOOK", and also 'FAN-ook".
    Just ask an Eskimo...


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    Quote Originally Posted by Hephaestus29 View Post
    This reminds me of Jay Leno pronouncing
    The Great “Cummins” diesel engine as
    Cummings”.
    Only because Jay Leno gets his rocks off over IC engined stuff...

    No different from any OTHER redneck hot-rodder on THAT point.

    Except he has more MONEY!

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    The general rule for pronouncing names, given only the written form, is that you still need a vocal demonstration to hope to get it right. And you still may not get it.

    One of my favorites is Chalmondeley, an English family and place name. It looks like a mouthful, but the answer is simple enough: CHUM-lee.

    Marquess of Cholmondeley - Wikipedia

    I knew a guy from Vietnam whose family name was Nguyen, a very common name there. I had him say his name several times and gave up.

    How to pronounce Nguyen: HowToPronounce.com

    Then there is our local English orchestra conductor, Andrew Constantine. Americans are often familiar with the Roman emperor and assume the conductor's name is said the same way. Wrong. He uses a long i and it rhymes with nine.

    I won't even get into pronouncing my name except to say it is Dutch and dates to 1652 Nieuw Amsterdam. The Dutch were not really happy when the Brits arrived in 1664 and announced that it was now called New York and Charles II, the English king, had just gained a whole bunch of Dutch-speaking taxpayers and some nice land with lots of potential for increased value once the subways and skyscrapers were built. My ancestors were still speaking Dutch among themselves in the 1790's and probably never thought of themselves as English citizens. My great great grandfather changed the spelling of our name to be "American" after licking the Brits in the second war of independence at New Orleans on 8 January 1815. That may have been when he stopped being Dutch and became American. Every family has history and it is a privilege to know some of mine.

    Larry

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    My wife's English father was looking at my small lathes and we got talking about U.S. makes and I mentioned Derbyshire and he raised an eyebrow and corrected me darbishure.

    I and everyone I know stateside says Hardinj.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Screwmachine View Post
    My wife's English father was looking at my small lathes and we got talking about U.S. makes and I mentioned Derbyshire and he raised an eyebrow and corrected me darbishure.

    I and everyone I know stateside says Hardinj.
    Derbyshire's only USA competition in expensive small precision lathes is Levin, once called Louis Levin & Son. I once talked to a guy who had met the son and he corrected my pronunciation. He said it is leh-VIN.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Derbyshire's only USA competition in expensive small precision lathes is Levin, once called Louis Levin & Son. I once talked to a guy who had met the son and he corrected my pronunciation. He said it is leh-VIN.

    Larry
    I would say Leh-Vin naturally. You would say Lee-Vin?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
    I would say Leh-Vin naturally. You would say Lee-Vin?
    I had been putting the accent on the first syllable: LEH-vin. There is a person who supports some PBS TV shows and gets the name announced in that way at the beginning of programs. I do not recall ever hearing a different pronunciation until the guy who had met the lathe maker corrected me.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I had been putting the accent on the first syllable: LEH-vin. There is a person who supports some PBS TV shows and gets the name announced in that way at the beginning of programs. I do not recall ever hearing a different pronunciation until the guy who had met the lathe maker corrected me.
    Larry
    Ahh, I see, the accent. I would expect the VIN to be weighted if it were of French origin. Then again, the French might pronounce that Le-VAN.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awander View Post
    Funny you should mention it-that's the other one I wanted to ask about. I've heard "Fe-NOOK", and also 'FAN-ook".
    And "Faa-Nook" and "Fan-Nick".
    Maybe here at 10 seconds.
    YouTube
    Now that's a robot.
    Bob


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