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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by majohnson View Post
    As luck would have it I was able to get the gib nut and lock nut out. I was worried about braking the crossslide casting. The gib on mine (1968) vintage does come out through the front. There isqq a lot of engineering that went into the production of these lathe. Everything cleaned up with minimal effort. I chased all the thread holes. The holes are in the picture I posted. They are almost 2” in and about 8” apart on the carrier. On the plus side there is no galling on any of the sliding parts.

    Car2,
    Thanks for the picture and the help. Your lathe must be a lot later production the oiling slot on yours is about double the size of mine. I would really like to get everything reground and scraped, but the money isn’t there right now.

    Thanks guys!
    Welcome, Glad you got things apart (tis wise not to hammer or force things). I've found the best solvent for old polymerized oil is isopropyl or ethyl alchol, and the "hand sanitizers" work quite well on areas you can get-at (and won't run right off like IPA); slather on with a brush, let sit for a couple of minutes, and work on it with plastic bristle brushes on painted areas, and brass brushes on unpainted areas, wipe off. And IPA/hand sanitizer won't damage paint and plastics like acetone, lacquer thinner (contains acetone and toluene), denatured alcohol (often contains acetone as the "denaturer"). A lot of the parts fit so well together usually, and the treads are so tight tolerance, it doesn't take much to stick things together--a bit of dried up oil, a ding or nick and things just wont go together (or come apart) easily.

    Those are pictures of a mid-80's HLVH, so it is likely significantly different (has the glued-on ground-steel inserts on the carrige dovetal bottom surface (one of the reasons any water-based coolant is a nono) and teflon sheet on the carriage). Note that the grooves in the crosslide are oil-retention grooves, and there are two pump pressurized openings in the carriage that located under the grooves. If yours works for your purposes, I'd not worry about "fixing" it more if it ain't broke; clean it up, adjust, make sure critical things are oiled, tighten things up as allowable and make chips. If one is trying to work repeatedly within +-.001 it may be required to have more pristine ways etc. Plus, a DRO might be better investment for accuracy and ease of use. Have fun. Cheers.

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  3. #82
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    For a lathe that I was told never run water based coolants, there was a lot of rust and build up of old coolant and oil. They had a much larger Lablond and the Hardinge facing each other. They did have coolant set up on the LaBlond. The existing hose on the Hardinge was old and brittle, so what they said made since based on what I had seen. I pulled the double bearings at the head of the leadscrew, they did clean up. Even the caged needle bearing cleaned up. There are a couple of things I want to order.

    Did these lathe have scraping on the ways when new? There is some scraping on the gib, but no were else. Since I had the crossslide off I figure I would check the wear, I put bluing on my granite block and surprising thing are flat. Anyone have a rough idea of the cost of having a ways scrape for the crossslide and compound.

  4. #83
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    Maybe someone just used some water-based coolant in a squirt-bottle occasionally. Pictures I've seen of ones using the coolant pump and water-based coolant some look like rust buckets. The water may also loosen the epoxied ground strips on the carriage, and get into areas where it won't come out.

    Someone else can chime in, it appears on the mid-80's hlvh, that the teflon carriage is scraped, the crosslide is scraped (the mating carriage crosslide has ground strips), the tailstock is scraped. The compound appears to be ground and flaked for oil retention, but not scraped. For rework, as I understand it, the slides are typically ground, then scraped, so there's shimming required to bring things back to centerline (same when the lathe bed is ground, shimming required), so it ain't cheap; if you're really interested Babin Machine could probably provide pricing. If you can't measure or detect any issues, the lathe probably isn't worn badly or needing re-grinding/scraping. Cheers

  5. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by majohnson View Post

    Did these lathe have scraping on the ways when new? There is some scraping on the gib, but no were else. Since I had the crossslide off I figure I would check the wear, I put bluing on my granite block and surprising thing are flat. Anyone have a rough idea of the cost of having a ways scrape for the crossslide and compound.
    I have not seen a new Hardinge. But I have seen a few clones in person at the dealer. One was a Victor. The ways are flat ground with no oil pockets. On yours just wipe a bit of #2 or #4 oil on the bed. The wipe will clean the bed and allow the tail stock to slide easily.

  6. #85
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    It been back together for a week now, no dark oil on any of the ways. I’ve been playing with some aluminum working on cutting threads internal and external. It came with a bunch of tooling, most is cemented carbide. I’ve been thinking about getting some insert tooling to use when I am doing work that matters. Even with the odd pieces Of tooling I have now, it cuts and leaves an excellent finish. Today I cut some 10-32 threads and they work great.

    I am wondering what type of tooling other Hardinge users prefer?

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    Quote Originally Posted by majohnson View Post

    I am wondering what type of tooling other Hardinge users prefer?
    If you are using the Hardinge tool holders then the maximum dimension for a tool shank is 3/8".

    One brand I use is Iscar.
    Internal threading: SER 0375 H11
    External threading: SIR 0375 H11

    ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - SER/L : 389�251 - SER �375 H11

    H.B Rouse Set for finish work.

    Rouse Carbide Insert Turning tools – H. B. Rouse

  8. #87
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    It came with the Aloris tool post and holders, most of my tooling is 1/2”. I have not look at ISCAR, I look at their offerings.

    I have atf leaking from around the carriage hand wheel shaft, a quick look at the parts book and I didn’t see a seal. There is a bushing in the assambly, I am wondering if it just worn to the point that allows fluid to leak past it.

    Thanks for the continued help.

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    I had a leak at the feed motor mount. I cut a gasket out of some thin gasket material and the leak was reduced to a drop every once in a while.
    Last edited by rons; 03-15-2018 at 01:32 AM.

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    I was wondering if there might of been a couple of o-rings inside the housing or shaft. Or there might be later update were Hardinge put some type of seal. The atf on mine comes out at the dial, all the markings are gone, lucky it came with a DRO.

    How much effort is it to go through the clutches and bearings on the front apron. I am trying to figure out if my next step is do the apron or pull the threading box apart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by majohnson View Post
    I was wondering if there might of been a couple of o-rings inside the housing or shaft. Or there might be later update were Hardinge put some type of seal. The atf on mine comes out at the dial, all the markings are gone, lucky it came with a DRO.

    How much effort is it to go through the clutches and bearings on the front apron. I am trying to figure out if my next step is do the apron or pull the threading box apart.
    I did not have a leak such as yours. Only at the feed motor mount.

    If you look at the atf level window, the marker will set the atf fluid level below the height of the handle shaft. So fluid coming out as you describe is not to be expected.

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    Anyone know the sizes on the drive screws for the threading knob insert plates. They seem smaller then the tags on the base and headstock. I was hoping one of the better hardware stores would of stock them, but no such luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by majohnson View Post
    Anyone know the sizes on the drive screws for the threading knob insert plates. They seem smaller then the tags on the base and headstock. I was hoping one of the better hardware stores would of stock them, but no such luck.
    Are they supposed to be screws or rivets?

    Did previous owner pop out the rivets and substitute screws? The knobs are plastic so anything close will form a new thread.

  14. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Are they supposed to be screws or rivets?

    Did previous owner pop out the rivets and substitute screws? The knobs are plastic so anything close will form a new thread.
    They are “drive screws” and readily available from McMaster-Carr, or at least were.


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    Pics and dimensioned drawings.

    Drive Screws | Jay-Cee Sales & Rivet, Inc.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stradbash View Post
    They are “drive screws” and readily available from McMaster-Carr, or at least were.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    They are called drive screws, but you cannot back them out. With a few emblem plates I tapped holes for small size button head screws which can be removed with a allen wrench.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    They are called drive screws, but you cannot back them out. With a few emblem plates I tapped holes for small size button head screws which can be removed with a allen wrench.
    HVL Purchase Question
    I’ve done the same with button head screws from time to time.


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  18. #97
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    It surprising the accuracy these lathes are capable of. I made some knobs for a adjustable stock of mine, tolerances I was able to hold are surprising, even more so for a lathe that dates to 1968.

    3f5acfc5-a15c-4d1e-b8b9-177ff519b91f.jpg

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    Put a fine reading indicator on the nose. I still get within spec on mine, +/- .000025. Not bragging, just saying.


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