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  1. #41
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    I see in the lathe picture that the big lever on the front for forward and reverse is still present. I cannot see if that lever is connected to anything. On an older machine, there would be a smaller drum switch next to the motor speed selector drum switch, and a rod would connect the big lever and the F-R drum switch. The cabinet has holes to mount an F-R drum switch and pass a control rod for one. I think this lathe may have a reversing relay (3M) instead of a drum switch. There should be a switch (SS1) to operate that relay, and a way to manually operate that switch.

    Larry

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    Looks like a great deal. I have one I bought new about the same vintage. I have all manuals and schematics if you need something. I have a newer DRO also, the original crapped out after about 20 years. Treat it right and it will be a joy to own. 000_0059.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I see in the lathe picture that the big lever on the front for forward and reverse is still present. I cannot see if that lever is connected to anything. On an older machine, there would be a smaller drum switch next to the motor speed selector drum switch, and a rod would connect the big lever and the F-R drum switch. The cabinet has holes to mount an F-R drum switch and pass a control rod for one. I think this lathe may have a reversing relay (3M) instead of a drum switch. There should be a switch (SS1) to operate that relay, and a way to manually operate that switch.

    Larry
    Chalk this up to me being in the same room as an hlv-h for the first time ever here, but... what big lever for forward reverse? When it comes to “big” levers, I’m counting 2: the threading carriage direction lever and the low/high speed spindle selector. What am I missing?

    The little switch on the front of the electrical panel labeled “forward / reverse” is not wired to anything inside the panel.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by RJT View Post
    Looks like a great deal. I have one I bought new about the same vintage. I have all manuals and schematics if you need something. I have a newer DRO also, the original crapped out after about 20 years. Treat it right and it will be a joy to own. 000_0059.jpg
    Looks beautiful


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I see in the lathe picture that the big lever on the front for forward and reverse is still present. I cannot see if that lever is connected to anything. On an older machine, there would be a smaller drum switch next to the motor speed selector drum switch, and a rod would connect the big lever and the F-R drum switch. The cabinet has holes to mount an F-R drum switch and pass a control rod for one. I think this lathe may have a reversing relay (3M) instead of a drum switch. There should be a switch (SS1) to operate that relay, and a way to manually operate that switch.

    Larry
    You are thinking in terms of HLV land...

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Chalk this up to me being in the same room as an hlv-h for the first time ever here, but... what big lever for forward reverse? When it comes to “big” levers, I’m counting 2: the threading carriage direction lever and the low/high speed spindle selector. What am I missing?

    The little switch on the front of the electrical panel labeled “forward / reverse” is not wired to anything inside the panel.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I do not have an HLV-H. On the Hardinge lathes I do have, one big lever does the high-off-low motor speed and the second big lever does the forward-brake-reverse. I guess the holes for mounting an F-R drum switch are there on the HLV-H because the same base and electrical cabinet were also made to work for the TFB-H lathe which has no threading capability.

    Anyway, you have switches and a diagram, so you just need some wire now.

    Larry

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  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Well, good news. It's legit, and it's mine.

    The guy that I talked to on the phone didn't know the whole story. The guy I met today did.
    Lathe was built in 1983 (verified by serial number), was in operation for 2 years in a prototype room at a big tech company here, and then went into a storage when they "upgraded" to cnc. It sat in storage until 5 years ago, when the current owner (previous owner now! woohoo!) pulled it out with the intent to use it - he installed the dro, and the light and... then it sat until now.

    He was actually able to borrow a RPC and power it up for me. Super smooth, zero vibrations all the way up through the rpms. Everything works as best I could test it, and there isn't a nic anywhere on this thing.

    I brought home the first load of parts today. Including a mag chuck, and the original paper work on the lathe! how cool is that!?

    I am beyond stoked!



    Ok so you warrant a big-azz "You Suck"

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Chalk this up to me being in the same room as an hlv-h for the first time ever here, but... what big lever for forward reverse? When it comes to “big” levers, I’m counting 2: the threading carriage direction lever and the low/high speed spindle selector. What am I missing?

    The little switch on the front of the electrical panel labeled “forward / reverse” is not wired to anything inside the panel.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You're correct, that's it on the later models. Again, I think your problem is simple and a result of someone adding and clipping that keylock switch, which is not stock.

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    With all the bad news lately, it's nice to read a real-life feel-good story. Congrats! As the old saying says: "Opportunity sometimes knocks, but it doesn't stick around for long".

    I got my HLV-H from a friend who I met through this forum. It is the single most important tool in my workshop.

    It is possible to convert a HLV-H to 220V single phase. The previous owner of my lathe did that. One VFD runs the spindle motor, and a tiny .25 HP VFD runs the speed change motor. The feed motor is DC and does not need 3PH. I'm not running a coolant pump.

    But if you want a simple option: An RPC or a Phase Perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cinematechnic View Post
    With all the bad news lately, it's nice to read a real-life feel-good story. Congrats! As the old saying says: "Opportunity sometimes knocks, but it doesn't stick around for long".

    I got my HLV-H from a friend who I met through this forum. It is the single most important tool in my workshop.

    It is possible to convert a HLV-H to 220V single phase. The previous owner of my lathe did that. One VFD runs the spindle motor, and a tiny .25 HP VFD runs the speed change motor. The feed motor is DC and does not need 3PH. I'm not running a coolant pump.

    But if you want a simple option: An RPC or a Phase Perfect.
    Thanks! I’d love to see pictures of your electrical cabinet if you don’t mind posting them. This setup is really appealing to me for a couple reasons: the reduced cost of operation, the ease of transferring to a new shop at some point, and the reduced noise factor... my shop is very tiny and a loud RPC motor running is definitely a concern.


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    Both rotaries I had were reasonably quiet. Both went out side though, mainly because the added heat in South Texas was not needed. Small hole in the wall and the RPC sitting on blocks near the electrical panel, no lost floor space either. WE had a single phase breaker feed the 3 phase panel plus the third generated leg. Way better than messing up the machine with VFDs. I added an oil filter to the coolant hose and it has not been used once in the 18 years we have been at the new location. Probably once at the old place. Might use it once in the while if we did any production on the HLV-H but it is mostly to support the CNCs with tooling.

    If you are in a cool climate the little bit of heat they throw off may be welcome. Floor space could be saved by putting it on a shelf?

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    Snagged a brand new american rotary 5hp for a good deal on Craigslist today. Wired and fired in under an hour after I got home with it. It is much quieter than I thought it would be.

    Thanks for everyone’s input. Stoked with this setup and don’t have to change any wiring in the lathe now.

    Quick question though, someone above mentioned making sure that the generated leg of power was not to the feed motor. Looking at my panel and the wiring diagram I’m seeing L1, and L3 feed the control box and the feed motor. Meaning I should make sure the generated leg should be to L2, correct?


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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Looking at my panel and the wiring diagram I’m seeing L1, and L3 feed the control box and the feed motor. Meaning I should make sure the generated leg should be to L2, correct?
    Yup. Mind. We avoid it for controls ESPECIALLY due to it being subject to wider Voltage swings than the other two.

    That said, it seldom jumps up and bugs you if you get it wrong - could run OK for ages. Not all rigs have a wide enough swing or touchy-enough controls to be bothered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Snagged a brand new american rotary 5hp for a good deal on Craigslist today. Wired and fired in under an hour after I got home with it. It is much quieter than I thought it would be.

    Thanks for everyone’s input. Stoked with this setup and don’t have to change any wiring in the lathe now.

    Quick question though, someone above mentioned making sure that the generated leg of power was not to the feed motor. Looking at my panel and the wiring diagram I’m seeing L1, and L3 feed the control box and the feed motor. Meaning I should make sure the generated leg should be to L2, correct?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    In addition to Thermite's response, the way to make sure the correct attachment (in case someone has switched some wires), is to actually trace the connections from the power input to the 120 volt control transformer. The the non-manufactured legs (220 volts betwixt them, or 120v each to ground), go to the control-transformer (120v out). Per the diagram and OEM wiring the wild-leg would be hooked up to l1 and l3.

    I've had an American Rotary 15 hp "CNC" converter for 12+ years, and it has worked perfectly, from 7 hp overhead sander to the HLVEM. It's quiet, I have the idler mounted on a board, sitting on a rubber mat and tucked under a stairwell.

    (Never used the coolant on the machine, although the pump works); I stuck a thin removable aluminum plate over the coolant well in front to keep from dropping stuff in there.)

    I'm sure other folks would be interested in your control and carriage motor retrofit when finished.

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    Default Inspecting a HLV-H thats not under power

    Good notes on the wiring there. I’ll get in there and trace connections for sure before I really start using the lathe.

    I got a little down the rabbit hole on 3-phase wiring and am now wiring a subpanel, adding a couple circuits for future machines and running conduit around the shop, doing a major shop rearrangement and building a whole new wall, and closing off my laundry room to keep the metal chips out of the wash (real reason: to keep the dryer lint out of the machines, easier to sell the added expensive to my responsible self and my wife the other way around though). Inspecting a HLV-H thats not under power

    Planning to tackle a lot of it with a couple weeks off work for Christmas break.


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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    Good notes on the wiring there. I’ll get in there and trace connections for sure before I really start using the lathe.

    I got a little down the rabbit hole on 3-phase wiring and am now wiring a subpanel, adding a couple circuits for future machines and running conduit around the shop, doing a major shop rearrangement and building a whole new wall, and closing off my laundry room to keep the metal chips out of the wash (real reason: to keep the dryer lint out of the machines, easier to sell the added expensive to my responsible self and my wife the other way around though). Inspecting a HLV-H thats not under power

    Planning to tackle a lot of it with a couple weeks off work for Christmas break.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Since I'm lazy, my lazy solution to the tools that I use infrequently on the phase-converter (and are located away from walls also), was to hang from the ceiling a long heavy-duty "extension" 3p twist-lock plug, so I just drag that to the seldom-used machines.
    (correction in previous post, I meant "NON-wild" legs are L1 and L3 on the OEM wiring diagram) Cheers

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    I run my equipment off a homebrew 5hp RPC. My manufactured leg bounces around 130-160v while the other 2 legs hold 120 solid But I run equipment without control board and such so it works fine.

    When I first built my RPC I did a simple calculation for my start caps and run caps.

    That calculation was not the best.

    When I start my RPC the dam thing jumps to full speed INSTANTANEOUSLY. Waiting for my 3rd winding to fly out of the idle motor.

    I also have my idle motor out back of the house bolted to roughly a 12x18x6 concrete slab. I can hear it running but FAINTLY.

    I noticed one day the lathe was a bit weak while cutting, a wire nut came loose in a box and dropped my 3rd leg out and when I flipped the drum switch to reverse the lathe just kept chugging along in forward!






    Also I’ll trade you a southbend 16 from 1957....


    Ok ok the southbend and a slow jack/ball rub combo but that’s my final offer!

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    Default Inspecting a HLV-H thats not under power

    Making a little progress on my 3 phase wiring project, but... The Craigslist deals struck again. Picked up this beefy little Lista cabinet today for a song from a retired jeweler in the city.

    My only wish is for the bottom 2, 3” drawers to be one 6” drawer. Would be nice to be able to move some of my chucks into there but they’re all just a bit proud of 3”. But who’s complaining? I’ve wanted one of these cabinets forever.




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    Quote Originally Posted by smithprocess View Post
    My only wish is for the bottom 2, 3” drawers to be one 6” drawer. Would be nice to be able to move some of my chucks into there
    Your "wish" is hereby GRANTED. Combining more than just two, if need be.

    Had the same issue with "blueprint" cabinets. Plenty of width and depth. Not enough vertical height.

    Dead easy solution. Remove an upper drawer. Or two.

    A) Cut you some straps - or sheet metal plates - that can be used to tie the vertical sides and their support rails together. You will be wanting the extra load-carrying benefit of four rails, (or six..) not just two.

    B) Remove the REST of the upper drawer(s) FROM the original vertical sides being retained.

    C) Apply the tie plates. You now have one deep drawer, but only a half-high (or one-third-high) front and pull.

    D) Salvage the front and pull off the former upper drawer(s).

    E) Attach the salvaged front(s) and pull(s) from the inside, at their backs, to the front and pull of the lower drawer - spaced to their "normal" relationship.

    It is generally "a very good idea" to reinforce the bottom of the new deeper drawer while you are at it.

    Can't claim any sort of "clever invention", here.

    Fine wooden furniture has been made that way - with a deep drawer carrying two "apparent" false-fronts of lesser height - for hundreds of years.

    "Plan B":

    Just set aside the upper drawer(s), UNALTERED!

    Fab extended sides to pick up its rails, and fab a filler at the front to cover the gap.

    Left-over laminate flooring works a treat. Tough surface. Can look "elegant", even. No sheet metal required.

    Now the whole shebang is readily reversible to OEM.

    But you'll probably have misplaced the drawer you asided by the time you come to do that!

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    I made a Kennedy 5-drawer cabinet with ball bearing slides into a base for my Hardinge HSL speed lathe. The drawers are 3.5 inches deep, not enough for the slide rest, radius attachment, lever cross slide etc. So I cut out the entire bottom of the second drawer from the bottom and fastened the two bottom drawers together. Still looks normal when closed, but now the bottom drawer is 7 inches deep with two pulls. Works great.

    I used a handheld electric nibbler to cut the drawer bottom.

    Larry

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