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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparky30_06 View Post
    so back to my original question, head sideways or upside down, which is better for moving and traveling and why?
    Save yourself both f**karound time and grief.

    Take-with one-each discarded motor vehicle, not wheelbarrow, TIRE.

    For the uber-strong cord at the bead that is buried in rubber.

    Drop a mover's quilt over the head. Then the tire, now you have 360-degree attach points the naked head did NOT have.

    Snag it four ways with ratchet straps to spread-out points on the trailer wall or skirt, depending on what make and style you HAVE.. so concentrated stress won't fail that end of the rig. Because it can do. S**t happens all the time.

    Tighten until the tire deforms. It has now become a shock-absorber.

    BUNGEE your ratchet straps at a slight bend-angle and tape-wrap the latch so they do NOT work loose from enroute shift or vibration.

    Navy, Merchant Marine, Seabees, Corps of Engineers prefer cordage AKA "ROPE", actually. But we know our ways with it.

    Block the base.

    Hit the road. Check real soon. Then again, then periodically.

    If it tips over? Your are a damned poor wheelman!

    The fool trailer will be on top of it. Same relative position.

    Otherwise it ain't going anywhere wrong.

    A tire.

    OLD trick for any heady-things with no built-in attach points in general.

    Combo of low/no damage, secure attach, all angles. And uber-durable shock absorber. Ever notice they used old tires for ages on cranes to run a headache ball or to place blasting mats? Tug boats? Dockside?

    Sore durable f***kers and free for the asking since folks have to PAY a landfill to accept them even for recycling, not burial.

    Take two and you have a flexible rubber space-filler as well. I do.

    May have been born at 11 of a morning, but it surely weren't YESTERDAY morning.

    Tires JF work. Rain, shine, snow, or hot sun.

    "Cardboard boxes"? Not so much..

    PS: five-dollah recycled rubber doormat from the Poor-Lady store (Dollar-whatever?) box knife. And you have corner protectors that cardboard ain't even on the same planet with, rain day least of all.

    Tarp anything? Take out the slack with cordage and bungees lest it beat itself to leaky rags from flapping about.

    Rigging:

    If you break load, break equipment, break skin, break a fingernail.. or even break a SWEAT?

    You are doing SOMETHING the wrong way.

    Rigging is a LAZY but ALERT man's game, not for oblivious Gorillas.

    You think. Gear works.

    It makes a good servant.

    And a deadly-dangerous master ..ever you let it try to switch roles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Save yourself both f**karound time and grief.

    Take-with one-each discarded motor vehicle, not wheelbarrow, TIRE.

    For the uber-strong cord at the bead that is buried in rubber.

    Drop a mover's quilt over the head. Then the tire, now you have 360-degree attach points the naked head did NOT have.

    Snag it four ways with ratchet straps to spread-out points on the trailer wall or skirt, depending on what make and style you HAVE.. so concentrated stress won't fail that end of the rig. Because it can do. S**t happens all the time.

    Tighten until the tire deforms. It has now become a shock-absorber.

    BUNGEE your ratchet straps at a slight bend-angle and tape-wrap the latch so they do NOT work loose from enroute shift or vibration.

    Navy, Merchant Marine, Seabees, Corps of Engineers prefer cordage AKA "ROPE", actually. But we know our ways with it.

    Block the base.

    Hit the road. Check real soon. Then again, then periodically.

    If it tips over? Your are a damned poor wheelman!

    The fool trailer will be on top of it. Same relative position.

    Otherwise it ain't going anywhere wrong.

    A tire.

    OLD trick for any heady-things with no built-in attach points in general.

    Combo of low/no damage, secure attach, all angles. And uber-durable shock absorber. Ever notice they used old tires for ages on cranes to run a headache ball or to place blasting mats? Tug boats? Dockside?

    Sore durable f***kers and free for the asking since folks have to PAY a landfill to accept them even for recycling, not burial.

    Take two and you have a flexible rubber space-filler as well. I do.

    May have been born at 11 of a morning, but it surely weren't YESTERDAY morning.

    Tires JF work. Rain, shine, snow, or hot sun.

    "Cardboard boxes"? Not so much..

    PS: five-dollah recycled rubber doormat from the Poor-Lady store (Dollar-whatever?) box knife. And you have corner protectors that cardboard ain't even on the same planet with, rain day least of all.

    Tarp anything? Take out the slack with cordage and bungees lest it beat itself to leaky rags from flapping about.

    Rigging:

    If you break load, break equipment, break skin, break a fingernail.. or even break a SWEAT?

    You are doing SOMETHING the wrong way.

    Rigging is a LAZY but ALERT man's game, not for oblivious Gorillas.

    You think. Gear works.

    It makes a good servant.

    And a deadly-dangerous master ..ever you let it try to switch roles.
    Just be careful if you do this that you don't damage the hi/lo lever, the spindle speed wheel, the brake lever, the quill feed engage lever, the quill feed per rev lever, the quill feed reverse slider or the quill feed gear lever. or maybe just don't do it.

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    Undo the four bolts and remove the head/ram.
    This done and you don't even need tie downs. (but you should put some on)
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Just be careful if you do this that you don't damage the hi/lo lever, the spindle speed wheel, the brake lever, the quill feed engage lever, the quill feed per rev lever, the quill feed reverse slider or the quill feed gear lever. or maybe just don't do it.
    *yawn*

    Owning a BirdPort does not actually have a fixed relationship to ingesting stupid pills.

    That's still a personal choice, even if a free chit to indulge at will is taken as an automatically issued right and privilege.


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    Yeah the thousands of shops that buy and USE Bridgeports and clones are all stupid, they should take advise from know it alls that owns an odd ball orphan and never uses it.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Yeah the thousands of shops that buy and USE Bridgeports and clones are all stupid, they should take advise from know it alls that owns an odd ball orphan and never uses it.
    Bob
    "Know it alls" still standing in the sweaty steel-toads year after year while some OTHER "knows he does NOT YET know nearly ENOUGH," swapped his for jump boots, then running the Department, then running the factory, then buying and selling entire companies and did it "well enough" to be able to retire by age 49? The next 16 years were "pro bono commune" and for pure fun, rather.

    Ever consider that meant going the entire run with ZERO hope of promotion and nary even ONE "salary review"?

    What TF would you promote an MD/Chairman who refuses a wage to, anyway?

    Take yer pick of advisors, Pilgrim.

    ALL wars are fundamentally wars of economics. All about resources, IOW.
    Who gets the cleanest most reliable water, most and best nutrients, healthiest blanket-sharers to make strong offspring as have the best odds to do it all over again, better and faster.

    And then we grew a SECOND primitive cell.... and we were off to the races!

    Life is competitive. It don't operate well off Gorilla-gluing yer steel-toads to the deck and steering by the rear-view mirror.



    The "clones" are largely better-engineered and/or more massive where it matters upgrades that address the antique's sh**tcomings even when they mass less and fit into ever-so slightly skinnier space overall.

    Acra cometh to mind for compact but a better performer. It is far from alone.

    Coat-tailing off the back of a legion of improved not-really-"clones", won't get you far at all.

    By definition, THOSE users are NOT running BirdPorts, ergo NOT the "stupid" ones.

    Common-sense pragmatists taking the good features of a light vertical onboard, running 30, 35, 40 taper, ergo leaving the LESS good, Are Ate, to those still "married" to the "genuine article", whether a converted add-on head ever DID have a place at the table or still should have.

    It be a 1930's fossil dragging obsolete ass along on the aroma of past pride.

    NEW ones are being manufactured WHERE?

    .. but now in a CNC world that needeth not even put its several axis in the same relationship.

    Hunters of deer usta brag the lowly .30-.30 lever gun had killed more deer than any other rifle on planet Earth.

    Surely it had done. For a time.

    For the simple reason no other firearm was THERE to even be pointed in the general direction of the poor deer. First few million year, spears had the upper-hand at it.

    Classical all-manual BirdPort is much the same.
    When the ONLY mill you have is a manual BirdPort?

    It surely does beat every other mill on-planet so long as the nearest of them is several miles away under some other guy's roof and maybe no longer resembles a "classical" BirdPort in any way, shape, or form.

    Hobby use is exactly what it says it is.

    I don't much LIKE that today's entry-level workhorse might be a Haas.

    But if I once again had hard numbers and tough deadlines to meet on razor-thin net margins?

    Off the back of value for money, there'd be a freaking whole row of the expendable critters doing their "please wear me out fast" g-damndest to earn the price of early replacement, lather, rinse, repeat, do it all over again, better and faster, cry about yesteryear all the way to the bank.

    China going to cut your ass a free pass off the back of BirdPort loyalty?

    How about the younger guy but two bays down the lane of yer same Industrial park?

    No, Pilgrim. There IS NO mercy for sake of nostalgia.

    They'll simple eat your rations, never know you usta be they one as had a claim, and keep on trucking 'til theirs are eaten by the faster-movers in THEIR turn.

    Dinosaurians actually survived. We call them either of birds or lizards now. BirdPorts will survive, too.

    Get useless enough? Day may come a BirdPort is elected President.

    Of the United States!

    How's that for showing appropriate respect for Old Times?

    If the HEAVY bestest fof the best legendary all-manual Old Iron of yester-century has been relegated to "hobby" and marginal struggle HARD smallholder use by THIS century?

    Whom ever said BirdPort got a permanent exemption from the march of progress?


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    Since I only move these things short distances I would not rotate the head as others have already said. But you are going a long way and it will probably be the tallest tool on the trailer. That being the case just flip it whichever way will not stick up as high, the weight should be somewhat balanced if sideways. Be sure to lower the knee onto a block of wood and all locks are tight on everything. Or just pull it off.

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    I moved my Index mill from upper Michigan to Omaha, NE on the back of a flat bed. At the time I left the head "up" but had to lower it to get it through the door when I got it to my shop. A couple of observations on the move: First, when you lower the head straight down it can be a bear to get it back up. My ring gear is very worn and it kept binding up when trying to restore it to position. I had to basically jack it up as I was turn the gear. I'm not sure you'll have the same problem but wanted to throw it out there. Another important thing I learned, other than to use more straps than you think you need, is to put a tarp over everything you are moving. A picture is worth a thousand words...



    That's not fur growing, I believe that is every stinkin' bug between Michigan and Nebraska.

    Hope that helps,

    -Ron

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  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Since I only move these things short distances I would not rotate the head as others have already said. But you are going a long way and it will probably be the tallest tool on the trailer. That being the case just flip it whichever way will not stick up as high, the weight should be somewhat balanced if sideways. Be sure to lower the knee onto a block of wood and all locks are tight on everything. Or just pull it off.
    Most have not really needed any more than that.

    Think it through. How much of a pounding right up close and personal do locks & such have to stand, year-in, year-out from a cutter too large driven too hard?

    And just how much shock - of a gentler nature and "damped" - will be getting past the trailer tires and suspension, average decent roadway, by comparison?

    Might be the least-stressful day the poor mill ever enjoyed - compared to any time it was simply at-work, doing its ordinary bizness.

    Tire don't have to go around the HEAD, BTW.

    Last time I looked, a BirdPort's ram still had TWO ends to it? Rope ain't gone obsolete yet, has it?

    OK. That was a dirty trick.

    But some folk just will NOT consider the options!


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    We are still scraping bugs off machines from our move, on a slightly nother note, we lost several small parts off various machines, nuts, knobs etc, nothing major but things I hadn't thought to tape or cover to keep small pieces on. I think it was vibration not bouncing and some tape here and ehrer would have helped

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    We are still scraping bugs off machines from our move, on a slightly nother note, we lost several small parts off various machines, nuts, knobs etc, nothing major but things I hadn't thought to tape or cover to keep small pieces on. I think it was vibration not bouncing and some tape here and ehrer would have helped
    I never did bother to find out what it was nor who made or sold it since a supplier just GAVE me a roll when I asked (easier than speaking bad English?), but the Kawneer-door "like" architectural extrusion suppliers we used in Hong Kong bundled their cut orders with a white tape that looked like electricians vinyl tape but was not.

    It never left gummy-residue on the decorative "loominum even if left taped for years.

    KNOWING a tape would hold well but always come away cleanly was NICE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    We are still scraping bugs off machines from our move, on a slightly nother note, we lost several small parts off various machines, nuts, knobs etc, nothing major but things I hadn't thought to tape or cover to keep small pieces on. I think it was vibration not bouncing and some tape here and ehrer would have helped
    Shrink wrap is a wonderful thing, not only will it keep off bugs and road dirt and little parts the would bounce off the trailer will still be there when you arrive. Highly recommend the shrink wrap for a long move.

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    Cool

    Hi,
    LOL!

    "Rope" on a Ship is called, LINE!(no matter what size!)

    Being a retired Merchant Mariner after 40 years...

    I hope to, one day, see some rope!

    Maybe, if I go out West, and hang out with some Cowboys, but...

    Have never seen any on a Ship!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
    Hi,
    LOL!

    "Rope" on a Ship is called, LINE!(no matter what size!)

    Being a retired Merchant Mariner after 40 years...

    I hope to, one day, see some rope!

    Maybe, if I go out West, and hang out with some Cowboys, but...

    Have never seen any on a Ship!!!
    LOL! Thot some of it was classed as "cable" or "hawser", but I'm a long way away from the craft even second-handed, other than my brother and I each having a wall-hanging of "Henry B. Hyde". His is Cousin Gordon Ellis' gift of an orginal in oil. Sometimes overly precise, as Gordon was actually a qualified Marine Architect, so his oils always had every bit of line where the lofting wanted it to be! Mine is a more fanciful repro of her loss on the rocks. Family had owned an interest in that particular Down-Easter in her better days is why that one.

    Just "cordage", "manila", "hemp", or "wire rope", "back in the day" to we web-footed hairy-ears. We were as likely to use it in place of concrete, bolts, or TiG welds as for anything linear.

    Only "poly" of specific-type-NOW... because-it-really, really MATTERS what with the extreme differences between and among.

    That said?.. Those valiant folk who took some of the heaviest casualties of war, ever ... to feed - literally in our family - our British Cousins?

    My maternal G'Dad, right after War Two ended, buried a Full Commander, US Merchant Marine. Hog Islanders for War Two, mostly, but Liberty & Victory plus odds and sods, mostly tankers.

    A printer by trade, Engineering spaces, flush-decker 4-stacker War One, then USS Tenadores Engineering crew when she went aground and broke up.

    Whilst recovering in a hospital in Hull, England, met and married-into the Merseyside-based OTHER seafaring side! Ship's masters under sail, then Royal Navy, Royal Merchant Navy, G'mum's family.

    My two uncles both also US Merchant Marine Engineering spaces on up to First. Steam up and down, North Atlantic, (3 ships sunk out from under him, a munitions load that did not explode, a tanker that did not burn, and a general cargo that JF sank). Ed said he never got his feet wet, though his mates carried him to the boat unconscious, bleeding from the ears, and deaf when that particular fish hit close to the engine room.

    Ray was steam round and round, Murmansk run, missed U-Boat drama, damned near done in by cold and topside icing, rather. He took a shore job on a nuke-powered steam turbine to never be cold again, only went back to sea, long, slow Pacific circuit, to fill-in some Union time after the only kid was grown and married.

    I call it rope if not cordage.

    What else would you use to "tie up" a no-account chikn'-killing dog ... as my landlubber Appalachian G'mum, other side, specified:

    "So its feet don't touch the ground"

    G'Dad took the hint. Dug the hole. Let the incorrigible idiot enjoy exploring it. .22 Stevens pistol was kinder than rope or line, either one.

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  19. #35
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    "What else would you use to tie up a no-account chikn'-killing dog ... so its feet didn't touch the ground?"

    .22

  20. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    "What else would you use to tie up a no-account chikn'-killing dog ... so its feet didn't touch the ground?"

    .22
    That long-barreled single-shot Stevens top-break .22 "LR" was bought to harvest the hogs, in place of a big wooden maul that wasn't easy to handle well.

    I used it as a child to harvest guinea fowl on the wing for the table.

    G' Mum would be a mite cross if the hollow point had to be dug out of the edibles, so head shots it were.

    Nobody in our clan would suggest that point shooting to save the mess in the meat and cost of .410 shells was hard. It was taken as a given either one could deliver the meat in one go or would never. Weren't any shades nor grades nor very much "practicing" to it on the farm. Late teens before ever I took up "targets". WVU rifle team ammo was FREE! Thot I had died and gone to heaven!

    Welll.. "heaven? .. might have been some girls involved, too, given around '63 we had begun plotting and scheming the advance invasion work to prove the feasibility of establishing beachheads .....for what was to soon after become known as the "sexual revolution".

    And then some assholes "gave a war" and I damned near missed the hole shebang?

    Timing! Sometimes mine has been impeccable, others impeckerable.


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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    We are still scraping bugs off machines from our move, on a slightly nother note, we lost several small parts off various machines, nuts, knobs etc, nothing major but things I hadn't thought to tape or cover to keep small pieces on. I think it was vibration not bouncing and some tape here and ehrer would have helped

    I was smart (lucky ) enough to take off all the handles that were removable or anything else that was loose before moving. It took extra time before I set off for home but it was time well spent. (I probably still have some "high velocity" bug goo in places that are difficult to reach.)

    -Ron

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    (I probably still have some "high velocity" bug goo in places that are difficult to reach.)

    -Ron
    It has probably lost any nutritional value by now.. but..

    Any true Alaskan could point you to recipes for feeding sled dogs, if not also people, with a highly nutritious insect stew.

    Y'see . Alaska has a challenging climate. Insects have adapted. They have literally been known to "bring down light airaft", and more than just the one time.

    As the old Management expression goes?

    "There are no such things as 'problems'. There are only 'opportunities'".

    Eat mo' BUGS!


    "Justice" y'see. Surely they have no hesitation at trying to eat YOU!

    You'd have to know Alaska?

    Dad said:

    "Well, Alaskans exaggerate like Hell! Their mosquitos aren't really so big as to kill Kodiak Bear and carry the carcass up into a tall spruce to eat undisturbed at leisure! That's pure bulls**t!"

    He claimed he had never shot one with either his .45 or 1903-A3 Springfield .30-06 the whole time on the ALCAN Highway survey and build-out that measured even the least bit longer than the length from heel of the handle to top of the blade of his double-bitted axe.

    Between the eyes.


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    Hi,
    LOL!

    Was working on a Sea-Land Ship out of Seattle, in the 80's...

    Tied to the dock on a containership in Kodiak, one morning.

    Just stepping out on deck, first thing in the morning to go to work, and...

    Saw the Bos'n, and some guys pointing towards the Range.

    A Mama Kodiak bear and two yearlings, were walking up the Range.

    The Mother looked like a big dump truck and the kids looked like Volkswagens!

    That might be exaggerated....But not by much!!!

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    I bought one a few weeks back about 300 miles from home, here it is on it's way home atop a piece of solid gold 1 1/8 subfloor.
    img_1809.jpg

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