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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
    The Mother looked like a big dump truck and the kids looked like Volkswagens!
    That might be exaggerated....But not by much!!!
    They ain't exactly light-alloy French racing bicycles, no.
    Nobody in their right mind would HUNT 'em wth a 1911A1 and standard-issue FMJ ball, but.. Alcan Highway project, crew on horseback exited the woods into a clearing just as hungry-bear enters outta the woods from the other side.

    Horses being smarter than they smell split left and right, one Sergeant's mount reared, dumped him spraddle legged on his ass directly in line with hungry-bear at the charge, levitated, hit reheat, exited the zone putting the odd hoof down ever forty yard for steering purposes. No FAA in those days to grant a clearance, so a wanna-bee Pegged-asses four-wheeler hadda hold to no-tower VFR rules for the departure pattern...

    God was only teasing.

    While the rest of the party were trying to get their horses back under control and clear saddle scabbards of .303 Enfield or 03-A3 Springfield, a lone, solitary 45 government opens up like a freakin 1928-A1 Auto Ordnance!

    I said God was only teasing?

    That Sergeant was Regimental champion pistol shot and a sore generous man as well!

    He had up and donated 12 rounds of .45 ACP FMJ to the account of a bare-foot poor bear who had probably never had two copper pennies to rub together his whole life, let alone a decent felt "Campaign" hat like "Smokey"!

    The injun guide went into forensic pathology mode, made certain of nine hits into nose, mouth eyes, removing chunks of the back of the skull on exit. Some damage was bad enuf he allowed as how it was possible, that just maybe not even ONE round had missed, but couldn't be sure.

    Dead bear's slack lower jaw had et' a chunk of Earth right about 4 feet short of khaki-clad crotch.

    The OIC first action when that .45 opened up? Only other .45 sidearm at the time - they fixed THAT "rank" related boolshit, later, Didn't even reach for a firearm atall - just reflexively started shouting:

    "Firing too fast, Firing too fast!"

    Deed done, score taken, John Tom looks up from that lodge of twigs he's run through all them dam' bullet holes, says:

    "Maybe next time you fire 'too fast' also, leftenant!' "

    Ever a Bear wants to arm wrestle, I'd b'leve I' mought be compelled to just cheat?

    Speaking of wrestling bears...

    One of the funniest films I ever saw - pre you tube, on real film - was Momma and Papa bear making cubs.

    Bears are right smart as critters go, and a lot more fun-loving and like humans that I ever wudda thot.

    I've no way of knowing if they are the only ones besides primates and cetaceans - I surely can't get my head around a Moose couple, Camellids, or wild pigs at it ...but face to face "missionary position" sex, not just "doggie style?"

    AGES before "CI" and noooo Hollywood can NOT fake this s**t with "bear-suits" the size of a Checker Cab!

    Whom, ever, wudda thunk they could even bear the bare bear breath?

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  3. #42
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    Legend has it that Alaska Airlines once had an aircraft out of service due to a salmon strike. It would have been a combination bird/salmon strike, but the eagle got spooked and dropped the salmon.



    Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerholz View Post
    Legend has it that Alaska Airlines once had an aircraft out of service due to a salmon strike. It would have been a combination bird/salmon strike, but the eagle got spooked and dropped the salmon.
    The way insects brought down light aircraft was to clog the air intake filters on float planes before their take-off run across a lake or river could get out of the swarms. Get lucky, you could abort, taxi back, shut down, clean filters, check time of day, any breezes & temps more favourable, try again.

    Get unlucky you were out of power to climb out, might not be able to return and make the landing for another try. Needless to say, Canadian and Alaskan bush pilots are seriously aware of those sorts of environmental factors!

    A guy named Les Cook kept Dad's "pioneer road" survey party fed and supplied with such superb photos that the route was so good it became the permanent road then stayed that way from 1942 until at least 1968 when Dad and Mum ran it pulling an Airstream Globetrotter, and he found that a new bridge was doglegged out of the original line.

    https://www.93regimentalcan.com/bush...laska-highway/

    There's a foto of Les and another of the pilots with his Norduyn Norseman in the Regimental "yearbook". As was the way those days, he was in a right nice suit. Folks tried to dress for clearing a pioneer road out in the wilderness same as if they were getting on an electric street rail car to go work in a brick office building, downtown Pittsburgh or Chicago.

    Partly that was because it was a more austere economy, War Two chasing the"Great Depression", and there were few/no specialized types of work or "outdoors" clothing even readily available.
    Last edited by thermite; 05-14-2021 at 07:32 PM.

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  7. #44
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    On a 1200 mile open move one may want to worry about rain also.
    Bugs no big deal, ... drenching thunderstorms, what are the odds?
    If ignoring the simple and easy take apart upside down lowers the CG. If blocked at 90 use tall wood blocks so that the table is sitting low.

    This a very easy machine move but some depends on lift on both ends. Drop down trailers need no more that pallet jacks. Pickup trucks or real semi trailers need a forklift on both ends.
    And there is in between. Done it with engine hoists on mid height car/lawn trailers but that somewhat scary.

    I can not say enough about run like hell if things go any bit sideways during the process of moving and all the helpers need that warning in CAPS.
    Do not try to save it, let it crash and get away.
    There is a 100% human thing to jump in and help with some tilt, wobble, strap fail, unloads the forks or pallet jack or skates.
    Everything in your gut says "I can fix or save a wreck or drop",.. this is so bad but most all do it.

    It may be that that the haul is the easy part.
    Bob

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  9. #45
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    So true. My setup may have looked wonky to some but by grabbing it so high the very low center of gravity wouldn't let it tip. The only think I worried about was the straps snapping. I was doing the job solo so I was in the seat of the tele-handler and no where near ground zero.



    I did get out to take a "scary" pic though...


    FWIW

    -Ron

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    So true. My setup may have looked wonky to some
    You prolly had enough reserve, but just a reminder, 'coz there are fotos and explanation readily found, online and good planning and preparation is the major part of a rig, avoiding "grievous tactical errors" the other.

    WHEN you use slings, chains, and straps the angles and the bends do not ADD to the rated capacity. Ever-and-always they SUBTRACT from the safey-margin budget.

    Some combinations are about as good as can be. Other angles and bends have put you beyond safe limits, even with a load but half the rating you THOUGHT you could lift with a given strap's rating.

    Keep that in mind. You will have one longer. A mind. Not a bustid strap.

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  13. #47
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    Thanks Thermite, I appreciate that.

    I was aware of that and tried to minimize any possible issues but I was working with what I had at the time. It certainly wasn't ideal but I moved it very, very slowly so it didn't bounce and put more stress on the straps than there already was. I have seen too many guys jerk a load around and not take physics in to consideration ( F=ma ) when they are calculating their load.

    Wile E. Coyote here

    -Ron

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  15. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    ..not take physics in to consideration ( F=ma ) when they are calculating their load.
    Uusta bee I cunt evin SPAYLE "ingineer" and now I are wun!

    So them greek numberz woz 'membered wit knee-monicers.

    ISTR "F=-ma" woz "F**KED=my-arse"?

    Todja there was greek in thar!


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  17. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    So true. My setup may have looked wonky to some but by grabbing it so high the very low center of gravity wouldn't let it tip. The only think I worried about was the straps snapping. I was doing the job solo so I was in the seat of the tele-handler and no where near ground zero.



    I did get out to take a "scary" pic though...


    FWIW

    -Ron
    It would have been entirely acceptable to pick with the forks under the overarm on either side of the column. Still low CG, no strap ratings to worry about and little if any sway.

  18. #50
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    I considered that but I figured it was too top heavy as this is an Index 860 mill (Sure I could be wrong but my "intuition" told me so ). I you look closely at the top photo you will see an extra drive motor and transmission for horizontal milling. The column is also taller to make room for the horizontal option.

    It was also a concerned that there was the potential for more damage to the mill by picking it up directly with the forks, not knowing how well the X was attached, if it would put pressure on the axis screw, or if it slid on the forks it could bend/smash some controls, etc. Yeah, all that could possibly be avoided but it would have required more setup and thinking.

    Thanks,

    -Ron

    I know the straps go underneath the whole shebang but by strapping it tightly around the top of the column I effectively made the CG as low as possible. Not actually knowing where the CG was on this machine it seemed safer/more stable to do it this way.

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    I have always used a lifting eye threaded into the top and thus had no center of gravity issues.

    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by ksimolo View Post
    I have always used a lifting eye threaded into the top and thus had no center of gravity issues.

    Ken

    Come one, that's not fair. That's the "Correct" way to do things. Next time around I'll plan ahead better and get a lifting eye for it. It's already threaded, I just didn't find that until it was a bit late. Live and learn, right?

    -Ron

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    Come one, that's not fair. That's the "Correct" way to do things. Next time around I'll plan ahead better and get a lifting eye for it. It's already threaded, I just didn't find that until it was a bit late. Live and learn, right?

    -Ron
    "Live and learn" that 90%-plus of the lifting eyes Harry Homebdy is likely to lay a hand or eyeball on are WOEFULLY below strength, too!

    Avoid the cheap lifting-goods-shaped-objects.

    Seek surplused FSN/NSN MIL-SPEC goods, USAF cargo, Corps of Engineers, Navy, Merchant Marine, Ordnance or Artillery spec. for "the good stuff".

    ELSE buy from a proper supply house a pro rigger can actually trust and does.

    Same again with any other hooks, rings, clevises, D-rings, straps, chains, wire rope, "etc."

    "Hooks can be deceiving."

    FAR too much outright s**t in the channel, and long-since.


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  24. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    "Live and learn" that 90%-plus of the lifting eyes Harry Homebdy is likely to lay a hand or eyeball on are WOEFULLY below strength, too!

    Avoid the cheap lifting-goods-shaped-objects.

    Seek surplused FSN/NSN MIL-SPEC goods, USAF cargo, Corps of Engineers, Navy, Merchant Marine, Ordnance or Artillery spec. for "the good stuff".

    ELSE buy from a proper supply house a pro rigger can actually trust and does.

    Same again with any other hooks, rings, clevises, D-rings, straps, chains, wire rope, "etc."

    "Hooks can be deceiving."

    FAR too much outright s**t in the channel, and long-since.

    Hi,
    LOL!

    Never met a Hook, Shackle, Wire Cable,(under tension) or a Politician, I trusted!!!

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  26. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
    Hi,
    LOL!

    Never met a Hook, Shackle, Wire Cable,(under tension) or a Politician, I trusted!!!
    Dunno. Ga-ron-tee I've met a politican or three a lot more likely to stay hooker-bent than high-alloy steel forgings!

    That don't make it a desireable trait. Just a predictable one.

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