New HLV-EM Owner...Super excited but I need help! - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    So the good and the bad...

    The good...I fired it up for the first time and it runs smoothly, from low speed through high, quiet with no vibration.

    The bad...with the metric/english thread knob rotated clockwise so that "english" is on the top the threading screw turns. With the knob rotated counter-clockwise it is difficult to get into position, and the threading screw does not turn...User error or missing part???

    The gearbox for sure needs to be cleaned and lubricated.

    I am looking at the parts manual to see if I can find the issue. Thoughts?

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  2. #22
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    Engaging the fwd/rev lever?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billtodd View Post
    Engaging the fwd/rev lever?
    Yes.

    With the English threading set I can work everything normally. With the metric threading set the threading shaft does not spin, regardless of levers or gear choices. It's almost like it's missing a gear in the gearbox so it never gets engaged.

  4. #24
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    This is a EM machine My claim that it does not need any change gears does not hold for EM machines Sorry my mistake
    On my taiwaneese copy of a HLVHEM the gears are 50 on the left shaft and 127 on the rightr shaft The 2 middle shafts do not need a gear
    That should fit nicely

    Peter

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    This is a EM machine My claim that it does not need any change gears does not hold for EM machines Sorry my mistake
    On my taiwaneese copy of a HLVHEM the gears are 50 on the left shaft and 127 on the rightr shaft The 2 middle shafts do not need a gear
    That should fit nicely

    Peter
    Thank you!

    Reading through the manual now, you are correct on needing the 127 tooth gear. I have the 50 tooth already, time to search for another part!

  6. #26
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    CaryC

    As Peter says "All the normal" pitches are standard in your gearbox especially since you've got a dual box.

    You will only need extra gears for NON STANDARD pitches.

    HTH and enjoy your new machine.

    Stay safe

    John

  7. #27
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    The 127 and 50 tooth gears are required, as shown in the picture below of my unmolested EM, to provide all the OEM pitches. If an oddball pitch not included in the chart is needed, then you can add gears I suppose.

    From your picture, you may want to check that dog-clutch actuator tightness and position, it's missing a set screw on to the shaft (think there are two).


    img_7019.jpg
    Also, if you need a new carriage feed motor control, there are a couple of threads here; a common 90vdc motor-controller, available from multiple sources, is all that is needed (and is a cheap upgrade over the ancient potted ones). Hardinge now only sells a motor, gearbox and control package, for the nominal fee of something like $4K.


    Those knob selectors on the gearbox can get gummed up with old oil and be extremely difficult to move. The shafts that go thru the pressed-in bushings are a very close fit. You can free them up by removing the knobs, which will allow some axial play in the shaft; then squirt mineral-spirits on the shafts on the outside and inside thru the gearbox cover, work the shafts axially from the inside and outside, and rotate them. Oil with light oil. I cleaned and greased the gearbox by placing a pan under it, and dousing it with mineral spirits in a lab squirt bottle, brushing with various utility and tooth brushes, moving all the gears and levers about. Then applied grease with contorted utility brushes.

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  9. #28
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    I have everything to complete my lathe, thank you everyone!

    I am going to take it apart and do a proper paint job, most likely sprayed wherever possible. I have heard the sherman williams machine paint is good. There are a couple of areas on the top where the original paint is worn through to metal and it is rough, so I need to build it up. The original paint is not cracking, so I will lightly sand and paint over.

    Any suggestions for a "bondo" type filler? Primer? Paint color? Other type of paint?

    Thank you again!

  10. #29
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    Be careful if you are thinking about taking it apart to paint it. I have seen a lot of machines that were victims of that good intention that never got put back together. The owner loses interest, moves and loses parts then, or gets another machine that actually works so the one down for paint ends up sitting for too long to make it. I have painted a couple of machine tools as well as cars and I think a machine tool is even more effort. The really good paint will kill you if you are not careful and getting the bondo right enough to make you happy is a bear. I have come to the opinion that old missing and messed up paint is just a fact of life and I would much rather have worn out and chipped factory paint than someone's Rustoleum rebuild that comes off when you get coolant on it. Look at bad paint like the wrinkles on an old machinist, a facelift is not going to make his parts any better.

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  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey_D View Post
    Be careful if you are thinking about taking it apart to paint it. I have seen a lot of machines that were victims of that good intention that never got put back together. The owner loses interest, moves and loses parts then, or gets another machine that actually works so the one down for paint ends up sitting for too long to make it. I have painted a couple of machine tools as well as cars and I think a machine tool is even more effort. The really good paint will kill you if you are not careful and getting the bondo right enough to make you happy is a bear. I have come to the opinion that old missing and messed up paint is just a fact of life and I would much rather have worn out and chipped factory paint than someone's Rustoleum rebuild that comes off when you get coolant on it. Look at bad paint like the wrinkles on an old machinist, a facelift is not going to make his parts any better.
    I am not going to gut the gearbox etc, but I am thinking of disassembling the major components...such as removing the entire gearbox, removing the headstock, and removing the bed from the pan/stand. This will allow me to properly remove the oil from the hidden areas and get a clean paint job.

  13. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaryC View Post
    I am not going to gut the gearbox etc, but I am thinking of disassembling the major components...such as removing the entire gearbox, removing the headstock, and removing the bed from the pan/stand. This will allow me to properly remove the oil from the hidden areas and get a clean paint job.
    If it twere me, I'd think long and hard about disassembling the gearbox and removing the head just for a paintjob, and assuming everything else is working well... Plain old oil-based enamels are pretty tolerant of a little oil, and easy to touch up. I keep a sheet of 1/16 thick silicone sheet draped over the headstock to prevent my knackering it up with tools, which would hide that spot if it's prayin' on your mind.

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  15. #32
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    The machine runs perfect from what I can tell. The paint is badly worn in a lot of places so it has surface rust...

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    Last edited by CaryC; 04-27-2021 at 11:50 AM.


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