Series II Bridgeport electrical diagrams
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default Series II Bridgeport electrical diagrams

    I recently purchased a series 2 bridgeport at an auction. It had a label on the panel that it was 480v, and I confirmed the wiring in the spindle motor was wired up for high voltage. I do not have 480v in my shop (rotary phase converter), and would like to get this wired back to 240v. I can do the motor easy enough, but am lost when it comes to what needs to be changed in the panel. Worst case, I can should be able to pick up a transformer fairly cheap at an upcoming auction, but if I can get it back to 240v, that would be preferred.

    Of course, then I'll have to move out my old mill and hope to not have to totally rearrange everything, as this thing makes my old 10x50 Bridgeport clone look tiny.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    I'm not sure what electrical components are in the control panel for your mill, but typically there will be incoming line fuses, a control transformer and a reversing contactor or magnetic starter. When changing the supply voltage from 480V to 240V, the current ratings will double. You will need to change the incoming line fuses to the proper current rating (likely double what the existing 480V fuses are rated for). The control transformer should have line side taps for 240V and you will have to connect to those taps from their current connections on the 480V taps. If there are magnetic starters, they will have heaters that will need to be changed to the proper current rating for motor protection. You can find this information on the component manufacturers website.

    Ted

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Thanks, right now, I'm looking to see if I can find a transformer fairly cheap, and use that to test the machine out. If I can't find one, I'll start looking at what you mentioned. The wiring inside the cabinet isn't terrible, but also not the cleanest in the world, so tracing things (with my limited skill set), would be more of a challenge.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    I'm not sure what your intent is for purchasing a transformer. Do you plan to use a buck/boost transformer to step up your incoming 240V power supply to 480V to be able to operate the machine as it is currently wired ?

    Ted

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talvare View Post
    I'm not sure what your intent is for purchasing a transformer. Do you plan to use a buck/boost transformer to step up your incoming 240V power supply to 480V to be able to operate the machine as it is currently wired ?

    Ted
    Planning on getting something like this. Will take 240 from my 3 phase panel through this, and feed the machine.
    3 kVA-75 kVA 3 Phase Transformers: 480-240-Volt | NAPCco

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    If I understand your situation correctly, you have single phase 240V power to your shop and you are using a phase converter to obtain 240V three phase power. You mention that you have a three phase panel. I'm guessing that this panel is fed from the phase converter. If this is the case, you don't need another transformer. You said the mill has a dual voltage motor, so as you've said, you can just change to the low voltage wiring configuration at the motor. I don't know what electrical components are in the control panel on your mill, but if it is original equipment and the machine was designed to operate on either 240V or 480V three phase power, then you should be able to convert the components in the control panel to accept 240V input as I outlined in my first post. If I am mistaken in my assumption about your existing electrical service in your shop, let me know and I will try to help.

    Ted

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talvare View Post
    If I understand your situation correctly, you have single phase 240V power to your shop and you are using a phase converter to obtain 240V three phase power. You mention that you have a three phase panel. I'm guessing that this panel is fed from the phase converter. If this is the case, you don't need another transformer. You said the mill has a dual voltage motor, so as you've said, you can just change to the low voltage wiring configuration at the motor. I don't know what electrical components are in the control panel on your mill, but if it is original equipment and the machine was designed to operate on either 240V or 480V three phase power, then you should be able to convert the components in the control panel to accept 240V input as I outlined in my first post. If I am mistaken in my assumption about your existing electrical service in your shop, let me know and I will try to help.

    Ted
    Yep, you are exactly correct. My biggest concern with rewiring my mill controls is I really don't have a lot of experience with control circuits and that type of thing, and the wiring isn't all that clean in the cabinet. My fear is that I would mess up some of the wiring, and make it non-operational. I found a transformer semi-locally for $160, so just trying to weigh out the better option at this point.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, Ca.
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    32

    Default

    Assuming the mill was operational on 480V when you got it, you can do as you're suggesting and boost your current 240V three phase power from your panel to 480V three phase with a transformer and just connect that to the input on the mill control panel and you should be good to go. Don't have to re-wire anything. I'm attaching a photo I found on the internet of a Bridgeport control panel. If the components in your mills control panel look like what's in this photo, you should be able to convert to 240V three phase input without using an additional transformer, although you will have to change fuses, heaters and re-configure the wiring on the transformer.
    (can't seem to rotate the photo)

    Tedbridgeport-electrical-panel.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Yeah, that's pretty close. Here is my panel. Not sure why its so small, but second one is a bit bigger.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bridgeport.jpg   bridgeport.jpg  


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •