What hammer to hit drawbar? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    My M head has an auto drawbar. Maybe you could reinvent the wheel and make a similar setup for a J head

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    I've used the heavy end of a Kurt vise handle for many years now. Built in 3/4" hex, handy swing over action, just the right mass and always there. And neither the drawbar or wrench suffers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M Kiser View Post
    I've used the heavy end of a Kurt vise handle for many years now. Built in 3/4" hex, handy swing over action, just the right mass and always there. And neither the drawbar or wrench suffers.
    M Kiser

    I was starting to feel like the odd man out here. This is the way I have been doing it for years now with out any troubles to the draw bar or handle.

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    The thing about using the wrench is that when those older manuals were written wrenches were generally finished in black oxide or phosphate, not chrome.

    Until it has happened to you it is hard to imagine how bad peeling chrome can cut you.

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    My uncle makes custom wrenches for that, 3/4" on one end 7/8" on the other with a brass hammer head cast on the handle. It's all I've grown up using.

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    Boneheads where my son worked never used a hammer. Unscrewed the drawbar all the way, then lifted it abd dripped it. Couldn't understand why the threads turned hard when putting in a collet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CDiesel View Post
    My uncle makes custom wrenches for that, 3/4" on one end 7/8" on the other with a brass hammer head cast on the handle. It's all I've grown up using.
    I'm curious if this poster is still around? I guess I'll try to message them. I'm in Kalamazoo,Michigan and I have a wrench like the one described. I've had it probably 30 years or so. Someone we didn't know stopped into our shop and gave it to the boss to "give it a try" and my boss gave it to me and we never saw the guy again and we didn't know how to contact him. Mine has TEC imprinted in the casting and that is from the mold the brass was cast in. I'm just curious if I can get another one?
    I just looked at mine to doublecheck everything ,it's a real craftsmen box end end wrench,3/4 one end and 7/8 other end. The cylindrical brass casting is cast over the handle where the 3/4 is imprinted and it has TEC embossed in the brass so that TEC is also imprinted in the mold. Just curious if I can get another one?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsdspif View Post
    I'm curious if this poster is still around? I guess I'll try to message them. I'm in Kalamazoo,Michigan and I have a wrench like the one described. I've had it probably 30 years or so. Someone we didn't know stopped into our shop and gave it to the boss to "give it a try" and my boss gave it to me and we never saw the guy again and we didn't know how to contact him. Mine has TEC imprinted in the casting and that is from the mold the brass was cast in. I'm just curious if I can get another one?
    I just looked at mine to doublecheck everything ,it's a real craftsmen box end end wrench,3/4 one end and 7/8 other end. The cylindrical brass casting is cast over the handle where the 3/4 is imprinted and it has TEC embossed in the brass so that TEC is also imprinted in the mold. Just curious if I can get another one?
    See post #12 in this thread. CDiesel last posted here in 2020, but included his email address, usually better than trying a private message.

    Biax power scraping and flaking tools

    Larry

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    great story;
    I hope you'll let us know if after all these years, you find the guy who never came back to make the sale.

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    Thanks for the quick responses. I noticed it had been what 10 months or something since the last post of his. I messaged him but it looks like it wasn't sent or there is a delay in sending? Anyway I'll look at the post you suggested. I really appreciate it. I have been a member here but I don't remember ever posting. I usually don't have questions and when I do my buddy is pretty knowledgable at mechanical stuff so I ask him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsdspif View Post
    I'm curious if this poster is still around? I guess I'll try to message them. I'm in Kalamazoo,Michigan and I have a wrench like the one described. I've had it probably 30 years or so. Someone we didn't know stopped into our shop and gave it to the boss to "give it a try" and my boss gave it to me and we never saw the guy again and we didn't know how to contact him. Mine has TEC imprinted in the casting and that is from the mold the brass was cast in. I'm just curious if I can get another one?
    I just looked at mine to doublecheck everything ,it's a real craftsmen box end end wrench,3/4 one end and 7/8 other end. The cylindrical brass casting is cast over the handle where the 3/4 is imprinted and it has TEC embossed in the brass so that TEC is also imprinted in the mold. Just curious if I can get another one?
    Good morning, my Uncle is getting close to retirement, but I think he is still making a few Ranmer Wrenches. His business is Triform Engineering in West Olive, MI
    I'd be happy to put anyone in touch with him that is interested.
    [email protected]
    616-566-6795
    Andy

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    Step one, buy new replacement spindle bearings for bridgeport. Step two, before installing them put them on the bench and beat on them with a hammer. Step three, continue hitting them once they're installed.

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    while swinging the 4 pound hammer, sing that old Michel Jackson song;

    Just beat it, beat it, beat it....

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    I have found this thread entertaining. First, BP mills should never be used in a production environment. They are manual machines usually used for one-off or short run tasks. In that light, power draw bars are over kill. I'm sure there are some that love them and they probably have good reason to use them, but they are a small minority of owners. I don't use a box wrench. I use a dedicated socket and ratchet that I leave on the machine. I don't like using hammers on my machines, but when needed on the draw bar, a dead blow is the wrong one. a sharp high shock blow is most effective to break a taper loose and brass hammers do no damage to the draw bar. I no longer use the standard BP collet, they are junk. I now use only ER collets and have removed the spindle key as well. I also have two draw bars. One in 7/16-20 and the other in M10. The R8 spindle has been adopted internationally as an inexpensive standard and many R8 tools now come with metric threads further disadvantaging power draw bars. So, in answer to the OP, a brass hammer is the hammer of choice in my experience.

  18. #36
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    I have a shop equipped Lixi hammer, their smallest. Delrin head on one side, brass on the other, prolly a 8 oz hammer at most. R-8's pop out with a tap from the brass head, literally 4" of free fall on the hammer. Tapers clean and very lightly lubed. Quill locked.

    Back when I was an apprentice (old guy story) the better North American knee mills (Tree / Gorton & etc.) had shallow taper spindles, typically 9 BS tapers or larger. Suck one of those clean and dry up into a spindle and you'll be boring it out and sending the spindle out for a rebuild (and looking for a new job!)

    WE all got into the habit of carefully cleaning the taper and mating surfaces and wiping them with a very light turbine oil before assy. And not being heavy handed!

    On my "garage B'port" a stubby ratchet hangs off one of the ram snugging bolts. It's for clamping the ram and the draw bar. The short handle discourages getting things stupid tight. IF you need an R8 pulled in tighter you need a more robust milling machine and a spindle with "drive keys". It was not uncommon for there to be a shop policy that the Bridgeports not spin anything larger than a 5/8 (16mm) tool.

    The standard Bridgeport is a light duty mill not a production machine, thought they frequently are used as such.

    Cyclotronguy

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    Hear, hear, finally someone who knows a Bridgeports proper use in the shop. We repair and rebuild them, you wouldn't believe how many blank stares I get when we tell people that the manual says to never use the power feed with bigger than a 3/8 drill bit. They were designed by a pattern maker with the original intended purpose being wood working.

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    You mean you're not supposed to use the quill as an arbor press? Caught a guy doing that once

  21. #39
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    Most of the time I don't need it, but when I do I use a regular rubber hammer.

    I hang it on a length of 8020 extrusion, along with a 1/2" drill with a Knee adapter, a VFD, and a shop towel bar.

    Also, as I mentioned in another thread, a Milwaukee right angle cordless drill along with a separate right angle adapter make an acceptable (for me) substitute for a power drawbar.


    drawbar1.jpg drawbar2.jpg

  22. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by clarkmag View Post
    The chuck gets stuck, but the collets with end mills do not. I need a bigger hammer. I have a plastic head hammer from Boeing surplus that weighs half a pound.

    I measured the weight of the drawbar plus the chuck is 4.5 pound.

    Should I buy a dead blow hammer?
    A brass hammer?
    A plastic hammer?
    Make a wood hammer?
    I use a small brass hammer.


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