5 Axis Mill
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: 5 Axis Mill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default 5 Axis Mill

    We are starting to look into software for a new machine we are ordering. I would like to know what is popular for 5 axis programming. The options we are considering are Mastercam (my background), GibbsCam (a co-worker's background), and at the suggestion of the machine salesman, fusion 360. Most 5 axis operations will be indexing to machine cores and cavities with inconvenient details on an angle. Possibly some 5 axis surfacing toolpaths in the future.
    So, if anyone has experience with these programs I would like to hear about it as well as other programs that may be good but not on our radar.
    Thanks,
    Jack

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Georgetown, TX
    Posts
    375
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    66
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    Depends on the machine as well...

    Mastercam purports to have a post for the Haas UMC750 for example... yet it doesnt work very well without some fixing (extensive IMO). Seems to me it should be boilerplate for them, after all how much more commonplace can you get than Mastercam and Haas.

    I have had my most success with Siemens NX for full 5 axis.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  3. Likes Qwan liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    930
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1103
    Likes (Received)
    573

    Default

    Get the post from Productivity, it should be bulletproof. The one I got from them for my VF-3SS with a TR-160Y trunnion is. Programming it with Mastercam, almost entirely 3+2 since that's what the parts want, but I know a lot of people doing complicated full-5 with it, and with excellent results. From what I hear about Fusion 360 it isn't much better than hobby grade, though I'm sure someone will disagree. If you want more options to consider I have heard good things about Top Solid.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Near Seattle
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2917
    Likes (Received)
    1232

    Default

    Solidcam (at least if you are solidworks users)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    653
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    472
    Likes (Received)
    294

    Default

    If you know Mastercam/Your guy knows Gibbs, and you are just doing simple 3+2 it should be fairly easy to get the hang of using what you know. By simply using a number of work offsets, or programing from the center line of the trunion(?), you can keep using the software in nearly the exact same way you already do. It may take a post update/learning who to use a post if you don't want to do any hand editing. If your machine is well enough endowed, and you can better learn to use the software (and set up the machine correctly), you can program without regard to the centerline of the trunion. When you rotate both axes to positions that are not 90 degrees to normal, expect the math to get a little harder. If you set your tool/work offsets the way some people have been taught, you will have a bad time at this level.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    41

    Default

    Fusion is quite easy to use for 3+2 axis indexing, but their simultaneous 5-axis cutter paths for mold/die work you may find lacking. However, if your "inconvenient details" includes concave corners requiring a lot of rest milling tool paths, you'll want to skip Fusion and check out more advanced options.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    10,032
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2609

    Default

    does cnc have dynamic work offset shifting ? many horizontal cnc are programmed always like a vertical mill as rotary table rotates part the G55 X Y Z B offsets automatically shift and are math compensated to the new rotation position.
    .
    hard to explain. otherwise spindle can be pointing in X Y or Z directions and towards + or - direction effecting G17, G18, G19, G43, G44, G41, G41 and G2 and G3 rotation direction CW CCW............ gets complicated fast

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Dassel,MN,USA
    Posts
    108
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    49

    Default

    My son does A LOT of full 5 axis programming. he uses Tebis CAD/CAM Software Processes | Tebis America
    Its nuclear weapons compared to Mastercam. Cost is not cheap at $80K a seat plus $2K a 1/4 for support.

    He does nearly all prototype work. Most parts will eventually be a casting with tons of intricate detail.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Thank you all for the replies. I think we are going to hold off on buying anything right now and see what we will need once we have the machine on the floor and understand it better.
    Thanks,
    JE

  11. Likes Chris59, iMillJoe liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •