Is anyone using Blender to do 3D modeling? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    685
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    201
    Likes (Received)
    208

    Default

    Punch! ViaCAD Pro v12 just weight and constraints- no force calculations. Easiest cad I have found for organic/artsy shapes and modeling. It renders good enough pictures for clients if you want- not blender grade for adverts and brochures.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    64
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    22

    Default

    I use Blender for subd modeling before importing the subd mesh into Rhino for conversion to nurbs. For that purpose, it's quite good. The workflow is quite efficient once you learn the key commands. I haven't done any animation in it, but I'm sure it's the same way. However, as you've already discovered, for anything needing precise dimensions, it's tedious at best.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Akron, OH
    Posts
    1,992
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    329
    Likes (Received)
    1521

    Default

    Many, MANY moons ago I did a lot of work in Lightwave 3D and a little in Maya. The rendering packages are good at what they do, and I did some client visualization work in them. They're usable for that.

    But where they're not that useful for engineering design is they're not driven by numbers. Say you've modeled up that nice wheel, and you have a parts breakdown, a print and a cutlist. Fine. But maybe the next customer needs one three inches smaller, or with a different gear ratio. If you've done a half-way decent job of modelling, in any real 3d package, that's a five minute modification. Change one number, all the rest of the parts update to match. The bolt pattern changes automatically. The cutlist updates automatically. The prints update automatically. Click, click, boom done.

    With a rendering 3d package, you don't get any of that. You do get the freedom to modify things in a much more organic fashion, add detail only where it is necessary, and the animation/deformation options are far, far superior.

    There's a little bit of overlap in things like jewelry and sculpture, because there the freedom a subD modeler allows may outweigh the ability to do families of parts and assemblies.

    I use Keyshot for visualization if I need shinier output than CAD does, or I need to animate. You just pull your CAD assembly in and go from there.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •