Average Hourly Rate for CNC Mill Programming - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    When I was fresh out of tech school in the late 90's, programming using my client's software and computer for 3 axis, I was billing $20/hr part time. Currently contracting full time for a medical device company programming and running 3+2, I'm billing $55/hr. The most capable contract programming group I know of charges $125/hr, and can program anything with a control.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    OP asked what do you bill programming time at, not what does a programmer earn.

    Range is normally $60/hr for simple stuff up $200/hr for complex 5 axis of high end turn-mill stuff. You've got to charge at least what it costs you, plus a bit in my opinion.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    Yea, he also said "job shop 3 axis" (nothing about 5 axis)

    I would go out on a limb and assume that is for one of two reasons:
    1) that is all he knows how to do.
    2) that is all his cracked version of MCAM will do.

    So:
    1) he is worth maybe $20/hr. tops
    2) he is best avoided.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    and the guys at the top likely have a paper to prove worth.

    Doctoral Degree | Mechanical Engineering

    and likely a $20 guy in Detroit can write a program just as fast..Agree not all but some.

    From my own experience with PhD level MEs or IMEs, it's more likely than not that the "$20/hr guy in Detroit" can and will run circles around the PhDs in programming.

    PM

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    You've got to charge at least what it costs you, plus a bit in my opinion.
    You are a business GENIUS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by precisionmetal View Post
    From my own experience with PhD level MEs or IMEs, it's more likely than not that the "$20/hr guy in Detroit" can and will run circles around the PhDs in programming.

    PM
    Ok, lets not get too far away from what the '$20/hr guy in Detroit' comment was supposed to represent. Nothing to do with skill level, the analogy was to represent someone with little overhead programming a very simple part.
    Keeping with that, don't kid yourself into thinking someone with a PhD in Mechanical Engineering will be programming a CNC machine often enough to be proficient. Those who have studied long enough in this field to acquire this level of education are working on much bigger ideas and problems. Any company who employs someone with this level of education as a CNC programmer is wasting their resources...or not being truthful.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by KristianSilva View Post
    You are a business GENIUS.
    You're only input to the conversation is that?

    F**k off j**k*ss and go back to the hole you came from.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by goooose View Post
    Ok, lets not get too far away from what the '$20/hr guy in Detroit' comment was supposed to represent. Nothing to do with skill level, the analogy was to represent someone with little overhead programming a very simple part.
    Keeping with that, don't kid yourself into thinking someone with a PhD in Mechanical Engineering will be programming a CNC machine often enough to be proficient. Those who have studied long enough in this field to acquire this level of education are working on much bigger ideas and problems. Any company who employs someone with this level of education as a CNC programmer is wasting their resources...or not being truthful.
    Spot on. LinkedIn and Indeed programmer postings might say something like: prefer a mechanical or manufacturing engineering degree or 5-10 years programming experience. Once in a while it will be a requirement and including programming experience but then the comp is much higher than a typical programming position. It doesn't make sense for an engineer who can easily make $30K-75K/year more than a programmer to do programming at programmer rates. If a consulting company does it all (engineering, design, programming) probably does have a staff of degreed people and probably does charge a top rate. I have seen some programmers do some amazing things with crappy software for relatively low rates albeit they spend more time to get the job done.

    @OP
    You should do some research on programming rates for the type of work you do, in the specific field and in specific areas of the country. If you can work remotely, that is in your favor.

    If you can work remotely then try not to tell your customer where you are located; it is irrelevant. I have heard of companies trying to pay less if you work from an area where the rates are lower. That's none of their business and you should be creating great programs, regardless. Ultimately it's up to you how much you charge and if you want to negotiate a rate.


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