Solidworks Certification - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 40 of 40
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NY USA
    Posts
    841
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    181
    Likes (Received)
    561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Welden View Post
    It wouldn't hurt to take that class. You may pick up a few key skills that you may not learn any other way. The certification doesn't mean anything from what I've seen.


    The only way to get good at CAD is to put in a lot of hours. Back when I was learning I would spend tons of my free time doing CAD. I liked it though, so it didn't really feel like work. If you like it, fricken go balls to the wall and do it as much as you can. Try and draw difficult things so you get stuck a lot. If you're into knives or guns or whatever, try and design your own stuff.

    A big part of learning Solidworks is learning what not to do. You'll know you're doing a good job if your models don't take nine years to rebuild and SW isn't crashing all the time.
    This.

    A huge part of SW is learning what not to do. SW like things done in a certain way, in a certain order that's the weakness of the history tree. There are usually several ways to do whatever you want, learning the best way is critical.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    398
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    149

    Default

    Two years ago I was interviewing designers for engineering development and production support at my then employer. We had one kid who put it on his resume, and beyond the chuckle of "I hope he didn't pay for that himself" it did nothing. Things we did care about in our interview:
    1) If I put you in front of a computer and ask you to model X, can you do it immediately, or do you fumble with the controls? (We did this candidates that interviewed well).
    2) If we hand you a print, can you tell me how you would model it.
    3) Do you know GD&T beyond "I saw it once"? The answer was almost always "no" which wasn't a big deal as you can teach it, but it would have been nice.

    Things we did value:
    1) Past work experience. This includes internships for those starting out.
    2) The guy who gets excited and plays with the student version at home in his spare time (as an alternative to experience). These guys usually brought pictures of their models, some were much more detailed than others. If you show a block and say "I modeled my house" we don't care. If you show a table that has the dovetails in the joints, proper heads on the screws, nice edge trim, decent coloring, we would care.

    My impression is that Dassault really wants to push certification (I certainly get enough e-mails about it), but that it doesn't really seem to mean anything in the real world.

    Edit: Other than messing around in CAD, which gets you surprisingly far at a quick pace, a local community college sort of class would probably be a decent alternative depending on cost. Either way it's going to come down to experience over certifications though.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    INDIA
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Solidworks Certification

    Nice post Keep Posting

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,748
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    178
    Likes (Received)
    223

    Default

    The original CSWP was about a 9 hour test at the VAR and cost $500\try.
    that was in 2001\02 consisted of a 50 multiple choice question test, had to model one part make the drawing with parametric dimensions and have it be able to change size without problem. There are two more parts to this you had to pick from three advanced items and model two of them, surfacing, sheet metal or a assembly.

    this really wasn't a simple task, no online tutorials or books or classes to get you thru it.

    so thoughts that got them did have the skills, today not so much, it's more of a test for your own knowledge.

    and if you worked for the VAR like did you had to get 100% not 80% like the customers and our multiple choice test was 100 question of a random 150.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    U.K. Hampshire
    Posts
    100
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    40

    Default

    Being "CAD certified" doesn't necessarily make a good designer. I've know real "whiz" kids at 3D cad but were hopeless designers.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    10

    Default

    If your current job (or prospective job) does not explicitly require the cert, then I wouldn't bother. The only Solidworks certification that's worth anything (in my opinion) is the Expert level, or whatever the highest one is. That involves finite element analysis and all the super duper advanced cool stuff.

    Like everyone else in this thread has said, the certification only really shows that you know how to use Solidworks, not necessarily that you know how to design. You're much better off using that resume space to list some big project that involved intricate design-to-manufacture practices.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    238
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    Iím on a roll with kicking dead horses lately.

    Things have changed: Anybody with a solidworks subscription is eligible for three exam vouchers every six months. How to get there is kinda silly, but if your company has a subscription I recommend it. You also get exam vouchers by getting the student version, which if youíre really gung hoe about it is a cheap way of taking the exams if youíre not employed by a subscriber.

    I donít think there is an age limit on who can take the exam. Someone described the one and only 5 hour CSWP. I just took the new CSWA and CSWP, and I think the content and purpose of said exams is very different from prior versions. Each exam is shorter, but the length and breadth of all exams combined is a lot.

    Iíll echo the now several year old voices on this thread: about the only thing the exams do is verify you know how many buttons Solidworks has and where they are. Hell, some of the questions were over-defined. It does nothing to help evaluate how good of a draftsperson the applicant is. Iíd go so far as to say if this certification was on a resume across my desk that it was a detractor: someone who has taken the exam knows well enough that it has little to do with engineering or drafting alike.

    I will say itís an excellent resource for learning what Solidworks can do. Iíve got hundreds of hours on projects working with design tables, assemblies, configurations, all that jazz. Yet both exams tested on features I had never used before. I donít think the exam would have been nearly as beneficial when I was in school; I wouldnít have even known what purpose said features would have in the work place.

    Iím working toward that CSWE, which is a bear. The CSWP and four out of five other exams are prerequisite to the CSWE, and material is pulled from all six areas. Thereís also a separate exam path for simulation, with an expert level. I canít speak for anything past the CSWP yet, but my impression is that if you arenít getting free vouchers to take these exams, you shouldnít take them. Itís honestly a lot of fun, and Iím learning a ton from studying for it.

    I would love to see a GD&T exam: where you have to model MMC, LMC, calculate bonus tolerances, etc.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    4,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1731
    Likes (Received)
    2163

    Default

    I'll add to this necro thread too.

    Many years ago we had a guy come in with the "golden" resume to interview to program and run our brand new (at the time) Haas VF3. Resume was outstanding, had several "certs" for some cad programs, Mastercam, etc. First week he leaves the vise handle (the swivel kind that comes with a Kurt style vise) on and by the time the machine went home in Y0 the handle had worked itself into a straight position and crashed into the door, bent the door, cracked the plexiglass.

    About a month in then he scaled a print (the first thing they teach you NOT to do as an apprentice) and screwed up a mold base. THEN (gets better) he insisted we didn't value his "skills" and was going to quit.

    So long story, degrees and certs mean jack shit in the real world, but some places will overpay these types of people because they have a few pieces of paper with their names on them...

  9. Likes AD Design liked this post
  10. #29
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,437
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    401
    Likes (Received)
    641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    I'll add to this necro thread too.

    Many years ago we had a guy come in with the "golden" resume to interview to program and run our brand new (at the time) Haas VF3. Resume was outstanding, had several "certs" for some cad programs, Mastercam, etc. First week he leaves the vise handle (the swivel kind that comes with a Kurt style vise) on and by the time the machine went home in Y0 the handle had worked itself into a straight position and crashed into the door, bent the door, cracked the plexiglass.

    About a month in then he scaled a print (the first thing they teach you NOT to do as an apprentice) and screwed up a mold base. THEN (gets better) he insisted we didn't value his "skills" and was going to quit.

    So long story, degrees and certs mean jack shit in the real world, but some places will overpay these types of people because they have a few pieces of paper with their names on them...
    Couldn't agree more.

    That piece of paper only means you managed to slip under the inspector's nose.
    What I consider a good potential hire is someone that is :

    1) At least somewhat mechanically inclined.
    2) Eager to learn (note: I didn't say willing, there is a difference.)
    3) Has a good attitude.
    4) Has a good work ethic.

    Bottom line is you can teach him Solidworks. You can't teach him responsibility or work ethics.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    128
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    84

    Default

    Solidworks class I took in college used the mechanical design certificate for the final exam. So I ended up with one without any extra cost or work. To work in most positions shiny paper don't matter if you can do the job. But I can't tell you how many times I've been denied an interview for a management position I was a good fit for on the sole reason that I didn't have a BS.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    4,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1731
    Likes (Received)
    2163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AJ H View Post
    Solidworks class I took in college used the mechanical design certificate for the final exam. So I ended up with one without any extra cost or work. To work in most positions shiny paper don't matter if you can do the job. But I can't tell you how many times I've been denied an interview for a management position I was a good fit for on the sole reason that I didn't have a BS.
    That is unfortunate, but it seems to be the norm for larger companies, regardless if you have the experience or not, need that paper!!

    The last big place I worked was a haven for college educated dummies running the show. It was clear (most of them anyways) they were just good BS artists with a "degree"...

  13. Likes g-coder05, AD Design liked this post
  14. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    238
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    About a month in then he scaled a print (the first thing they teach you NOT to do as an apprentice) and screwed up a mold base. THEN (gets better) he insisted we didn't value his "skills" and was going to quit.

    So long story, degrees and certs mean jack shit in the real world, but some places will overpay these types of people because they have a few pieces of paper with their names on them...
    Iíll sympathize a bit with your bad apple, but only a little bit. That was me; except it was a lathe chuck handle and I didnít tell the owner Iíd busted it. I was young and dumb and thought I knew everything; then I was furloughed. They had an ass-backwards way of doing it, and I wasnít necessarily upset not to be working there, but I f***ed up. I was wholly unprepared to work under the pretenses of experienced machinist or engineer.

    Then I got my own equipment and worked as an actual machinist for a few years for a hole in the wall that barely kept its head above water with 30 year old equipment. Iím no design engineer, nor am I a toolmaker, but Iíve got enough experience to know what I donít know.

    I would disagree with the statement that you canít teach good work ethics: you have to learn it from someone at some point. It was only from my own mistakes and from leaders whom I considered mentors that I learned how not to be an A-hole. It definitely takes some ďAHA!Ē moments and a humble attitude.

  15. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    PHILIPPINES
    Posts
    2,671
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    695
    Likes (Received)
    1044

    Default

    hat is unfortunate, but it seems to be the norm for larger companies, regardless if you have the experience or not, need that paper!!

    The last big place I worked was a haven for college educated dummies running the show. It was clear (most of them anyways) they were just good BS artists with a "degree"...
    Sounds like M&M Mars. 2nd year college grads designing massive candy lines and it's constantly a headache. In my tiny home town getting on at Mars is next to impossible,,, unless you know someone. When they do get on it's like a status thing. The engineers there are the worst to deal with.

    I've been making parts for them since the 80's and always wondered if it was worth the headache. A few years back I got an order for the Chocolate mold for the new Dove chocolate cubes. A custom rolled round chunk of 304 about 30" diameter and 40" long 2" wall. This beast had something like 16,000 dove chocolate shaped tapered squares with the dove logo inside each one. The run time alone was around 240 hours and most of that was with a 60K rpm speeder head with a .008 endmill. After this thing was machined it had to be polished so four guys with Dremel tools and jewelers rouges spent another week on it.

    finally get the thing delivered and I get a call from the engineer in a fit of rage. I drive over for a meeting and apparently the engineer didn't mirror the Dove logo. Now somehow this is my fault for not noticing the logo was backwards because Mars engineers are the best of the best. They want me to split the cost of remaking another one. Uh, no, I didn't make the mistake. They revoked my supplier status all because a 20 year old engineer fkd up and I wouldnít eat the cost.

    A piece of paper without real world experience is almost useless in my book.

  16. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    917
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    612
    Likes (Received)
    535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    In my tiny home town getting on at Mars is next to impossible,,, unless you know someone.
    -Would that be in Cleveland (TN)? Just curious, description fits.

  17. Likes g-coder05 liked this post
  18. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    4,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1731
    Likes (Received)
    2163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thunderskunk View Post
    I’ll sympathize a bit with your bad apple, but only a little bit. That was me; except it was a lathe chuck handle and I didn’t tell the owner I’d busted it. I was young and dumb and thought I knew everything; then I was furloughed. They had an ass-backwards way of doing it, and I wasn’t necessarily upset not to be working there, but I f***ed up. I was wholly unprepared to work under the pretenses of experienced machinist or engineer.

    Then I got my own equipment and worked as an actual machinist for a few years for a hole in the wall that barely kept its head above water with 30 year old equipment. I’m no design engineer, nor am I a toolmaker, but I’ve got enough experience to know what I don’t know.

    I would disagree with the statement that you can’t teach good work ethics: you have to learn it from someone at some point. It was only from my own mistakes and from leaders whom I considered mentors that I learned how not to be an A-hole. It definitely takes some “AHA!” moments and a humble attitude.
    It wasn't the fact he made a mistake, it was that he way overstated his capabilities. As far as the certs he had, I dunno, maybe "knew" someone, or was booksmart but no common sense?

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    275
    Likes (Received)
    430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AD Design View Post
    -Would that be in Cleveland (TN)? Just curious, description fits.
    I was thinking the exact same thing.

  20. Likes AD Design liked this post
  21. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    PHILIPPINES
    Posts
    2,671
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    695
    Likes (Received)
    1044

    Default

    Would that be in Cleveland (TN)? Just curious, description fits.
    That would be correct!!!

  22. Likes AD Design liked this post
  23. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    917
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    612
    Likes (Received)
    535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    That would be correct!!!
    No longer with us?

    YouTube

  24. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    PHILIPPINES
    Posts
    2,671
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    695
    Likes (Received)
    1044

    Default

    No longer with us?
    Kinda still with you guys. I still own the buildings the industrial supply, Steel warehouse and Machine shop where at In front of Bradley High. Part of the family still owns D&W Machine in the industrial park. When I'm stateside I do some fixture designs for him but for now I have to wonder if some looters gonna burn my buildings down before I put in another shop or industrial supply.

  25. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tennessee USA
    Posts
    917
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    612
    Likes (Received)
    535

    Default

    All is, and has been, fairly quiet unlike other cities like Atlanta though isolated incidents are always unpredictable.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •