What software for 3d design, leading to CNC machining ? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I recommend Fusion to try out initially. It is fairly limited but it is free to check out and relatively inexpensive thereafter, if you're profiting from it, but it will give you a decent experience on getting started in CAD and CAM. By the way, typically the users who say Fusion is powerful and has a great feature set have never used nor know anyone who use higher end systems lol. Just saying.

    NX11
    NX12

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    I did some parts for a company that made tracers to trace the inside of spectacle frames. So I gather that even if your modelled frames weren't perfect, they would still be mechanically traced prior to the lens edger being programmed to grind them anyways.

    In concept, I think I'd model the front profile of the frame as an extruded tubular shape and then cross cut it with a curved line. No actual numbers for me, just graphical, that's how I'd do it in OneCNC. The actual retention groove would be a profile cut with a custom double angle cutter. Maybe real frames are better built than that

    A belt buckle? That could actually get pretty serious to model if you wanted some sort of engraved 3d thing. Frankly not a good use of a cnc, unless you're into making the molds for diecast.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by len_1962 View Post
    not sure how you haven't Paid for AutoCad or Inventor in 10 years, unless you are in education or....??
    All perfectly legit. Meshmixer, free and always has been. 123D design, free to use, until they canceled it. I forget the name of the beta test for 123D design, but they gave that away for a couple years. fusion360, free enthusiast 1 year renewable license I've had for about 3 years. Used autoCAD on a student license when I went back to school recently for CNC. Did you know that autodesk even allows fusion360 for use by start-ups to a certain point? Because I have never used it in business or to make profit in any way, autodesk gas been very generous. Read the current fusion360 enthusist/hobbyist license. No charge. If I ever do go professional, guess who I will be buying? That is why they give so much away for use. Oh, autodesk academy is free too and that is a great educational spot.
    Before all of this I used Sketch-up with the .stl exporter from guitarList.

    I'm moral to a fault on software because what I need is given freely. That makes it easy.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptnBlynd View Post
    All perfectly legit. Meshmixer, free and always has been. 123D design, free to use, until they canceled it. I forget the name of the beta test for 123D design, but they gave that away for a couple years. fusion360, free enthusiast 1 year renewable license I've had for about 3 years. Used autoCAD on a student license when I went back to school recently for CNC. Did you know that autodesk even allows fusion360 for use by start-ups to a certain point? Because I have never used it in business or to make profit in any way, autodesk gas been very generous. Read the current fusion360 enthusist/hobbyist license. No charge. If I ever do go professional, guess who I will be buying? That is why they give so much away for use. Oh, autodesk academy is free too and that is a great educational spot.
    Before all of this I used Sketch-up with the .stl exporter from guitarList.

    I'm moral to a fault on software because what I need is given freely. That makes it easy.
    in your original post you also said you used Inventor for free?
    so what are we to think?
    those of use that have been around the horn a few times know whats free and whats not and those in EDU know them ins and outs too.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    I did some parts for a company that made tracers to trace the inside of spectacle frames. So I gather that even if your modelled frames weren't perfect, they would still be mechanically traced prior to the lens edger being programmed to grind them anyways.

    In concept, I think I'd model the front profile of the frame as an extruded tubular shape and then cross cut it with a curved line. No actual numbers for me, just graphical, that's how I'd do it in OneCNC. The actual retention groove would be a profile cut with a custom double angle cutter. Maybe real frames are better built than that

    A belt buckle? That could actually get pretty serious to model if you wanted some sort of engraved 3d thing. Frankly not a good use of a cnc, unless you're into making the molds for diecast.
    Thanks all for the replies. Sorry for the delay in responding; just got comp up and running again.

    Re.Belt Buckle
    I a not sure what process will provide the highest quality design or logo on a meta buckle. Cost is a secondary concern.

    Milling , using an endmill (CNC or manual mill)
    Etching
    Engraving. Laser engraving or using a dedicated CNC engraving mill

    -
    I am planning on taking Fusion 360 classes at local technical college this Summer or definitely in the Fall. The industrial arts department at Univ of Wis in Milwaukee uses rapid prototyping. I plan on enrolling there in the Fall.

  6. #26
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    Let me know how they are - I have looked at doing something over there or at MSOE...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Thanks all for the replies. Sorry for the delay in responding; just got comp up and running again.

    Re.Belt Buckle
    I a not sure what process will provide the highest quality design or logo on a meta buckle. Cost is a secondary concern.

    Milling , using an endmill (CNC or manual mill)
    Etching
    Engraving. Laser engraving or using a dedicated CNC engraving mill

    -
    I am planning on taking Fusion 360 classes at local technical college this Summer or definitely in the Fall. The industrial arts department at Univ of Wis in Milwaukee uses rapid prototyping. I plan on enrolling there in the Fall.
    if you really want to learn prototyping go to school at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College and take their Prototyping program: Prototype and Design Associate Degree - Northeast Wisconsin Technical College.

    I've been doing prototyping as a trade since I left in 1985 NWTC, then it was called "Architectural Industrial Model Making" now Prototype and Design. they'll teach you the ins and outs.

    but then again UWM is closer to you.........

    from Cedarburg originally.

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    I'm from Grafton! Live in Saukville now.

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    What gkoenig said.

    Don't over think it. Getting proficient with fusion will give you the hands on knowledge to answer your own questions, most of which are particular to your own needs and can't be answered well by anyone other than you.

    Fusion is a cheap education and may be all you need. At the rate its growing, probably all you need.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by len_1962 View Post
    in your original post you also said you used Inventor for free?
    so what are we to think?
    those of use that have been around the horn a few times know whats free and whats not and those in EDU know them ins and outs too.
    Inventor also handed out free one year. I do not know if it was renewable. I found it more advanced than I liked at the time. I hear complaints about Autodesk licensing for commercial use, Autodesk is beyond generous to the non-professional.

    If you have not checked out autodesk "Remix" it has a free level as well. Below 50 or 100 images, I forget. It also is the only software I know which will import .STL and export a quad-mesh, which fusion360 can import and manipulate directly in the sculpt area. A tiny use for a large and complex program but they give it away. How can I argue with that price?


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