Where did the HEM / high speed machining SF come from? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    .....
    It is my understanding that coatings with Al need heat to help turn the Al into oxide, though I could be wrong as I am just a guy who uses the tools
    .
    You are 100% correct. For this reason there are the many flavors or name for AL based PVD coatings. Many have a underlying layer or additive for life when the coating can not be converted to AL2O3 in use,
    AL at PVD temps will not bond to the carbide substrate at all. If will flake off, hello TiN or TiCN.
    The only way to put true AL2O3 on is cvd with a bonding layer and that thick coat process not good for upsharp endmills so one only sees it in inserts than can handle a honed (radiused or rounded) cutting edge.
    Bob

  2. #22
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    One of the first times I ran a tool dry in stainless I was blown away. I was assisting a client with an application in 15-5 H900 heat treated, 1" deep pocket about 12" long x 6" wide. They were roughing it out in an hour with a 3/4" end mill old school plowing. I was working with their Iscar rep (nod to Clay) and he showed me how MasterCam had their tools in a "hsm/hem" tool library. We went with a 3/8 5 flute, full 1" depth of cut, 5% stepover with airblast. The Dynamic milling with Iscar said to run at 14,500 rpm (1400sfm) at 650 ipm! I said yeah right, tools won't last...we ran the first part, 13 minutes. part and tool were barely warm. Chips were taking the heat out and a nice golden color. We ran ten more parts and I said let's change the tool just because. It hadn't failed. Biggest issue was getting the mountain of chips out of the machine. Knocked about a month off of the 250 part run with a lower cost 3/8 end mill. It is my understanding that the high SFM is possible due to the short time the edge is in the cut versus out of the cut, coatings and geometry. The air is primarily to keep chips out of the way of recutting and to do some cooling. Dry is good in some materials and processes but not all...

    2012-08-10-12.59.29.jpg

    Here is another one similar parameters and material:

    20170123_145717.jpg

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by evega View Post
    Hey everyone,
    I'm working on upgrading my programing skills and introducing my shop to HEM / high speed machining. The thing that stumps me is: how did Helical Solutions get 1,000 SF in 1018 steel in a youtube video when that tools data on the website is listed as about 240 SF ?? After looking and reading around for a few months, I'm starting to think it's either that I'm not understanding what's out there or that there is no real number/formula to go by and it's more of a concept per application/part while less 'old school-this range is what it has to to be'.

    My goal is to show this style of programming can benefit our shop by reprogramming a few parts and showing a comparison of the results. The materials I'd like to try this on are 17-7, 304 and 316. We're set up with good sturdy machines with 10k,12k,20k spindles and a wide range of good end mill brands so I'm confident we're equipped.

    Understandably, there will be some amount trial and error but I'd like to reduce the scrap, broken tools and set-up time as much as possible before attempting this with a steel part on company time.
    I use a program called HSM Advisor to get my starting points

    Advanced CNC Speed And Feed Machinist Calculator - HSMAdvisor

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by toolsteel View Post
    I use Volumill numbers posted from Gibbs for high speed toolpaths.
    In one version of Gibbs I think those numbers were actually "powered by" Helical?????
    I think Helical has some high speed machining calculators that you can download.

    Doesnt exactly answer your question.....
    I believe the feeds are generated using "chip thinning" principles. Not sure about the Surface footage...
    Yes. Volumill is very good. Volumill is also an NX addon. Much much much better than Dynamic mill in Mastercam.

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volitan View Post
    I use a program called HSM Advisor to get my starting points

    Advanced CNC Speed And Feed Machinist Calculator - HSMAdvisor
    they also have this as an app for phones

    Free Advanced Online CNC Speed and Feed Calculator

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by len_1962 View Post
    they also have this as an app for phones

    Free Advanced Online CNC Speed and Feed Calculator
    I like that you can use it as a plug in for Mastercam too. Haven't tried it since I updated to 2020. Hopefully it's ready.


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