Y Axis Face Milling - Mill Turn Programming Question
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Clearwater FLA
    Posts
    1,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    79
    Likes (Received)
    235

    Default Y Axis Face Milling - Mill Turn Programming Question

    Let's say you're programming a mill turn machine that has both C and Y.

    You have a part with a "pocket" feature on the face that if you tried to program with the Y axis, the needed X moves would be out of the travel limits of the machine.

    You don't want to use C and you don't want to use polar.

    How do you handle programming face features that are outside of the X travel of the machine?




    Like in this example.


    2019-09-19_13-21-43.jpg



    A standard pocket cycle would create both Y and X moves on the X+ and X- side of the part. With most machines having limited X- travel, what would be your approach?

    Currently I am creating a boundary for the area of the pocket that would be in the X limit of the machine, then I index and repeat.

    2019-09-19_13-31-53.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    49
    Likes (Received)
    155

    Default

    This is essentially how we program our largest parts in our shop. We separate the face into sections that we can reach, machine, then index and repeat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    PHILIPPINES
    Posts
    2,341
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    464
    Likes (Received)
    681

    Default

    Either tha'ts one of those parts that plays tricks on your eyes or that is a Boss not a pocket. Either way, I get what you are trying to do and yes you could unlock the C and rotate then lock it up again to finish the feature. But my question is why would you not want to use C polar in this case?

  4. Likes barbter, Billetgrip liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Aberdeen, UK
    Posts
    3,477
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1214
    Likes (Received)
    1298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    Either tha'ts one of those parts that plays tricks on your eyes or that is a Boss not a pocket. Either way, I get what you are trying to do and yes you could unlock the C and rotate then lock it up again to finish the feature. But my question is why would you not want to use C polar in this case?
    When you're getting close the centre like that polar isn't so great, lots of jerky C axis motion while it struggles to maintain the feedrate.

    Cartesian motion generally just works better.

  6. Likes g-coder05, barbter liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    180
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    49
    Likes (Received)
    155

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    When you're getting close the centre like that polar isn't so great, lots of jerky C axis motion while it struggles to maintain the feedrate.

    Cartesian motion generally just works better.
    Or you have a part that is 36" in diameter on the end you are machining vs 12" where you are chucking and you have to put a carjack under it to act as a steady rest to keep it from sagging .

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Clearwater FLA
    Posts
    1,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    79
    Likes (Received)
    235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    Either tha'ts one of those parts that plays tricks on your eyes or that is a Boss not a pocket. Either way, I get what you are trying to do and yes you could unlock the C and rotate then lock it up again to finish the feature. But my question is why would you not want to use C polar in this case?

    You are correct it's a boss and I am using a pocketing toolpath. The main reason why I am not using C or Polar is to there is a tight tolerance and locking C and cutting with Y is a more ridged setup.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •