Machine Shop Manager at UC Santa Barbara - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BGL View Post
    "..so-called learning disability such as dyslexia"

    My junior high school career guidance councilor was very kind when I told him I wanted to be a machinist.
    I think you should look into something that is less math intensive was his reply.

    Dyscalculia I recently learned it is called, the struggle is real. I can nearly instantly manipulate complex three dimensional objects and assemblies in my my mind as if in CAD yet miss carrying the 2 when balancing my checkbook
    ..go figure.

    B
    Sure glad Im not the only sufferer of this! I try to explain to people that I can see whats on the inside of an assembly, or how it works just by looking at it quick...
    It really blows people away, and they figure i've worked on the item before. Nope.
    Its a strange intuition to have, indeed.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by macds View Post
    Sure glad Im not the only sufferer of this! I try to explain to people that I can see whats on the inside of an assembly, or how it works just by looking at it quick...
    It really blows people away, and they figure i've worked on the item before. Nope.
    Its a strange intuition to have, indeed.
    Not at all strange in this crowd. I'm another. But I always double-check my math, because I've *never* slipped a zero. Ever.

    Regards,
    Brian

  4. #23
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    I met Rudy a couple of times. What a terrific guy ! I have a similar Job at another UC. If you have good management, it is one of the best jobs you could imagine.
    If you don't have people who know what they are doing then it's a rough way to make a living. Wow the salary is off.... top pay for that job is $135,400 and $99,000
    is mid range. As I remember it was a really nice shop. I hope they find another Rudy !

  5. #24
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    Quoted salary is middle of the range and we are trying to raise the range further. Position is still open - send in your apps soon!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #25
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    One mighty proud dad here! Slightly off topic but my son just committed to UCSB as a Physics major. He will be starting this summer in the FSSP program. I am a little nervous, he is my oldest and I have no university experience. He applied for Engineering with Physics as his second choice. I guess his 4.5 GPA and 1500 SAT weren't enough to get him into Engineering? He is excited about starting though and the Liberal Arts education seems to make sense. Any encouraging words, guidance or suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Also, where can a Physics degree take him? Thanks all!

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  8. #26
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    It’s a solid but crowded program - best tip I can give is that you can get a great education at a big state school like UCSB but it won’t get spoon fed to you like at a top private. You need to go out and demand that education, and make sure that studying is the priority - not work at Jamba Juice (so many of my students skip classes for shifts at crap jobs they need to pay the bills, it’s really depressing) or parties. Send me a DM and I’ll send my contact info - send your son by when he arrives and I’ll show him the ropes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BROTHERFRANK View Post
    Also, where can a Physics degree take him? Thanks all!
    Having worked with a lot of physicists (students, post-docs, profs, working) I have an answer for you.

    Anywhere.

    A good physicist, someone who really knows his/her stuff, can do just about anything. First, it take a really smart, teachable person to learn the field well, and second, since an understanding of physics means you have an understand of how the world works, it means you can go from that foundation into anything else.

    When I was young, one of my first jobs was working with a guy who had a PhD in High Energy Physics from Harvard, and he still remains (in my inexpert opinion) the smartest person I've ever personally known. This includes a lot of MIT folks too, so it's not a class of one.

    He was doing research towards high energy ignition systems and microwave stimulated combustion, and I was making parts for his test engines. While not a trained EE, he was able to teach himself enough of the field that he could design extremely efficient circuit boards and modules to drive the ignition systems as well as converse at a high level with people expert in the field.

    I've seen similar with guys who went from physics into finance, computer science, engineering, etc. If your son does well, he'll be able to move into almost any other field and do great there too. And once he's in the system he can take on some engineering courses too, perhaps changing majors if he really wants to.

    As bmazin noted, it's how your son applies himself, how focused he is on the work that will determine how he does. Make sure he doesn't start feeling overwhelmed, he needs to know when to ask for help if he's not picking stuff up right away. He needs to find fellow student who have the right attitude (not party-central types) and work with them.

    I've occasionally given advice to people entering university, and the comment about picking good people to hang out with is something I stress. It's not just about how you do at the moment, it's the relationships you'll carry forward, hopefully for life. These are your study mates, but also potential employees/employers, consultants, etc. Friends even...

  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sealark37 View Post
    More open positions than there are workers to fill them.
    Open positions with people not willing to live in poverty to fill them.

    $75k in Santa Barbara to manage a shop that produces physics grade machined parts? Do they provide a place to put the cardboard box you'll be living in on campus?

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  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BROTHERFRANK View Post
    Also, where can a Physics degree take him?
    Can't say whether it's a good or bad thing, but when I lived in Santa Barbara I worked with quite a few UCSB physics grads who ended up in computer programming.

  13. #30
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    That's a beautiful shop- stuck my head in there when my daughter was there for a tour. Friendly staff invited me in to see it from the inside. Advise for your son- don't get in party mode. Best of luck- as someone else said, make sure he gets a job in a lab working for a professor in his field- it makes a huge difference to employers after graduation as do summer internships.

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  15. #31
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    I can't say I'm surprised that the job is still open. They take forever to hire. About a dozen years ago, when Nelson retired from the mechanical engineering shop, I was one of the finalists for his job. From the time I sent in my resume, it was about 8 weeks before they contacted me. From that point, it was another several weeks before they said they'd narrowed it down to 2 of us. And the job had already been open for a while before I applied. (I didn't need a job until my shop burned down) I was desperate for money, so I had to take a different job when it was offered. Anyway, it was about 3 months from application to pulling out, so it didn't surprise me a bit when a friend just told me he saw the listing on Indeed today.

    BROTHERFRANK-
    Congratulations to you and your son. I would guess that he really did qualify for the train driving program, but the school wanted him for physics. At least in the 90's, UCSB recruited physics students the same way other schools recruit athletes. Back then, they had one of the top 3-5 physics programs in the country. They still might, I don't know.
    Little known fact: They have their own nuclear reactor on campus. I think it's decommissioned, though.

    If he can read a print, and knows his way around Solidworks, I can probably get him a part time job running QC for a shop about 2 miles from campus. No guarantees, it's not my shop. But they have a shiny new Zeiss gathering dust, because no one there has the time to learn how to use it. I think they still have a couple weeks of training, paid for, and waiting for someone to take the class. Jockeying a CMM through college looks MUCH better on a resume than working a McJob. Send me a PM if you want me to try to set something up.


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