1943 Sidney 16x54 Refurb - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    Yada yada yada...not yet.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
    Yet.

    I did pull the cover on Sunday. It was quite nasty on the sealing surface, which allowed some water to get in while it was outside. So I got that all cleaned up.
    And now you all may feast your eyes upon my gears!

    And I shot some video. If you've ever wondered how Sidney could shift 16 speeds with only 3 levers when contemporary lathes would use 4, it's shown in the video. Really neat mechanism.

    Here is full size for the photos if you really want to poke around: Sidney Lathe Headstock Full Size - Google Drive

    So after getting the cover mating surfaces cleaned up, (Both planed btw!) I drained the oil. It was contaminated with water so it was hard to tell how nasty it was, but definitely had some gunk in it. I drained 2-3 quarts out of the 7-10 it is supposed to have. Hmm (Foreshadowing). I also found some large swarf in the bottom. The hell? Were people machining with the cover off? Idk. Probably pulled the cover without wiping around it first. Whatever. It didn't seem like any had gotten into the gears. The gears all seemed to be in acceptable shape, though there was a little wear visible on some, like the pinion on the largest reduction set.

    I did not pull the pump as predicted, but did pull the "filter" housing and clean it like you are supposed to do "Every 30 days". Nothing seemed wrong with the 77 year old screen so I put that back in place and filled it with a little over 2 gallons of diesel. I had the VFD down to 10 HZ which is how I could get the video of it running. The pump worked fine but didn't have enough volume to make it up to the some of the oil pipes. We did discover some issue at 60hz however. The input shaft seal was dribbling diesel at an unacceptable rate, and it was really pissing out at the spindle behind the chuck mount. Sigh.
    Input shaft seal is no biggie, but I don't want to have to pull the spindle apart. But I may not have to. Referencing the manual, it looks like it has what Mike C called a Labyrinth Seal. (Looks different than the ones online so IDK.) I've seen a few of them on the machine already, and the ones I've found looked like buttress threads, but not in a spiral. So, being that the book calls out no seal, and it instead looks like something I have seen elsewhere on the machine, I'm inclined to believe that there is no actual seal there. And it was probably running out because the diesel fuel was far thinner than the 30 weight oil it calls for in addition to it being a little overfull. Does this sound reasonable to you all?

    headstock-seal.jpgimg_7117ecs.jpgimg_7115ecs.jpgimg_7120ecs.jpgimg_7116ecs.jpg

    Gah I wish I could post more photos. They're in the drive if anyone is curious though.

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  3. #22
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    Thanks for showing those gears!

  4. #23
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    Welcome! Happy to provide.

    -----------------

    The broken headstock handles are fixed, and temporarily back on the machine.

    img_7130s.jpg

    So, how did I do it?
    First, I loaded both handles up in the Tom Lipton mini pallet and milled off the old braze.

    img_7057s.jpg

    Then a 50x80 thousands step was bored into the tiny amount of cast iron left.

    img_7062s.jpg

    I then took a piece of drill rod (Why? Because it was round and smooth. At least I think itís drill rod. All mystery metal to me) and machined the internal dimensions and left a small shoulder for a 1 thousands press fit.

    img_20191217_153939081s.jpg

    They fit up perfectly after a little push with the Dake.

    img_7067s.jpg

    Continued in next post.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_7057s.jpg   img_7062s.jpg   img_7067s.jpg   img_20191217_153939081s.jpg   img_7130s.jpg  


  5. #24
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    Part 2:
    Care was taken to make the final height the same, even though the handles had been machined differently.

    img_20191217_213422811s.jpg

    Then they were brazed on. First I did both with the tig, but I had trouble getting heat penetration down into the chamfer. After cleaning one totally up, I dropped it and it broke apart. No Bueno.

    img_7077s.jpg

    The other one I reworked with the tig, and the broken one I had dad torch braze. Torch brazing was the way to go. Even though I was careful and had it clamped in the vise when I tigged it, the forces still pulled it off center some . Dadís one was perfect though. Though I had ground the first one the first time, dad did them the second time around and got a little carried away and removed well more fillet than needed, reducing their strength some. Luckily, he mostly cut the drill rod which is plenty strong compared to the CI, but I would have much preferred a hearty fillet.

    img_7097s.jpg
    img_7099s.jpg

    Then they were painted red, which Iím not as big of a fan as I originally was. But I still like the blue. Theyíll still need some proper springs and new taper pins, but at least I have something to shift it by for now.

    img_7126s.jpg

    I also donít think their breakage was entirely or maybe at all due to ham-fistedness. Looking at if from an engineering perspective, itís a bad design. The comparable Monarch CY has huge, heavy levers. This lever has a 3/4" OD and a 1/2" ID where it broke. So, only a tiny 1/8Ē wall thickness. To make matters much worse there is zero corner radius. It definitely takes some force to shift as well. So after thousands and thousands of shift cycles, Iím sure a tiny fatigue crack developed and propagated easily due to the lack of corner radius. So yeah, maybe it got wrecked in an accident, but the fact that both plungers and knurled pull-sleeves werenít bent or damaged at all, I have to assume that it was fatigue that took the levers out. If they break again Iíll find someone with a CNC to make some steel ones I guess. But they should do for a while.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_20191217_213422811s.jpg   img_7077s.jpg   img_7097s.jpg   img_7099s.jpg   img_7126s.jpg  


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    Another Sidney owner here and following your thread with interest. Mine is a 1942 16X54 and I am the third owner. The machine was in government service at Jefferson Proving Grounds in Madison, IN and was later transferred to Crane Naval Warfare weapons Center, where it was eventually sold as surplus. The next owner used it in a local shop till the motor burned out. I found the machine on Craig's list and it followed me home, to be a retirement project (when I had more time!!) It's moved to the top of the project list and is currently disassembled for cleanup, paint, and repair.

    The cross slide and compound sliding surfaces have some wear but are still tight. The bed ways look very good. The carriage v-ways are extremely hard and appear to be inserted before grinding. It's equipped with lead screw reverse, taper attachment, micrometer carriage stop, 3 and 4 jaw chucks, collet closer, faceplate, steady rest, and a set of change gears.

    Issues discovered so far:
    Burned out motor... replaced
    Non-working apron/carriage oil system...the pump works so it's most likely clogged lines or distribution block
    Lead screw/feed select lever not properly engaging and locking in....I removed a stray socket head cap screw from the gear box (big crash just waiting to happen)
    Here are some old pictures before it was unloaded.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails picture-029.jpg   picture-031.jpg  

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  9. #26
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    Howdy. Just wanted to saying Im enjoying your journey, keep up the good work.

  10. #27
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    Thanks Bob, glad to hear it.

    Well like all days, some good with some bad.

    Lets start with the good. The new bearings for the clutch were installed and it's pretty quiet. It works extremely well. We also got the seal installed where it was dripping oil, and got the new tapered roller bearing installed on the outer side of the input shaft. The nut had gotten loose and the bearing had been processing around somewhat causing uneven wear. Probably got some trash in there too. So we reinstalled the clutch (again!), filled it up with the 30 weight and gave it a test run.

    Now for the bad:

    First, the VFD is too small and blows the internal protection unless you are pretty ginger with the clutch. And that's without the 70lb chuck + workpiece.

    Second, it still drips out the input shaft and(!) comes out the spindle nose at higher speeds (starting at around 450 and really slinging out at 793). For the input shaft it had some slight damage to the seal area where it had worn out. So maybe we can sleeve it after pulling the clutch yet another time. For the spindle nose, there are two issues I could see.

    #1, the drain from the tapered roller is blocked as Mike C suggested to check.

    #2, the seal behind it which keeps splash out of the bearing is junk and allowing splash to enter. If that seal is dead, well for one, we have to strip the entire headstock, for two, we'll have to replace every seal and probably a lot of bearings, and for three, every bad seal will probably have ruined the shaft, as that seems to be the trend. And the book notes that it's a special seal, as if we needed more to compound the issue.

    headstock-seal-2.jpg

    So I guess the first course of action would be to drain the oil again and poke around at the bearing drain, see it it's clogged. If not, then I guess we decide whether to run it slow and accept some drippage, or pull the headstock. Certainly that would be after the rest of the lathe is back together, we need bench space and would have to do it in one fell swoop. The bearing oil supply line could also be crimped off slightly, but at some risk to the bearing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails headstock-seal-2.jpg  

  11. #28
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    Well, dad and I decided today that we will have to do something we really don't want to: strip the entire headstock.

    We were investigating the rear oil leak, stripped the clutch off in record time, and found that the seal was perfect. But we noticed that there was a missing grub screw which closed off the threaded removal hole for a blanking plate for one of the intermediate shafts. Doh! Simple fix though. It was an amazing lucky coincidence though that the screw was out, because in shifting the drivetrain around we could see the end of the shaft whopping about by over 1/16". This is a high speed bearing tapered roller bearing, running at almost input shaft speed. So we settled on the fact that if one is that bad, we really have to investigate all of them. We also found the middle "bearing" on the spindle, which is a brass bushing, was sliding around and not tight in it's housing. I think I will knurl it and turn it back to size.

    Does anyone have the manual for the 16" Herringbone version? Or have experience with tearing the headstock down? The herringbone uses tapered rollers as opposed to the dual-row angular contact of the spur model, so if we had the manual or a picture of the headstock diagram we could order bearings ahead of time. Either of those resources could save a lot of time.

    In the way of positive progress, I got the weird grinding on the handwheel brazed up. It is now ready be cleaned up and tapped for the new spinner. Ideally it would have had a push in replacement like the original, but we couldn't beat a metric threaded one for $4.



    -----------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by excello942 View Post
    Another Sidney owner here and following your thread with interest. Mine is a 1942 16X54 and I am the third owner. The machine was in government service at Jefferson Proving Grounds in Madison, IN and was later transferred to Crane Naval Warfare weapons Center, where it was eventually sold as surplus. The next owner used it in a local shop till the motor burned out. I found the machine on Craig's list and it followed me home, to be a retirement project (when I had more time!!) It's moved to the top of the project list and is currently disassembled for cleanup, paint, and repair.

    The cross slide and compound sliding surfaces have some wear but are still tight. The bed ways look very good. The carriage v-ways are extremely hard and appear to be inserted before grinding. It's equipped with lead screw reverse, taper attachment, micrometer carriage stop, 3 and 4 jaw chucks, collet closer, faceplate, steady rest, and a set of change gears.

    Issues discovered so far:
    Burned out motor... replaced
    Non-working apron/carriage oil system...the pump works so it's most likely clogged lines or distribution block
    Lead screw/feed select lever not properly engaging and locking in....I removed a stray socket head cap screw from the gear box (big crash just waiting to happen)
    Here are some old pictures before it was unloaded.
    Hey mate, sorry I missed your post. Awesome machine! I wish ours was in 1/10th the shape yours is. Ours really should have been scrapped. Maybe still should. I used to think that no running, operating machine should be scrapped, but I have changed my opinion. We should have cut our losses a while back, though it still wouldn't be a bad time. We will have touched every single part and fastener by the time we are done. Replaced most every bearing. And it will still be a worn out lathe.

    I'd be curious to get get some pictures of the hard stop if we ever get ours going. Is it the revolving type?

    It looks like your speed plate is brass? I guess the cheeped out to the pot-metal tag in 43? Ours is all busted up.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_7136s.jpg  

  12. #29
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    Clappedoutbport,

    The carriage stop is a screw with a graduated barrel that turns in the casting. I will post some pics.
    I am looking for pictures of the taper attachment bed clamp...mine is missing.

    Thanks,
    Excello

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    Well, dad and I decided today that we will have to do something we really don't want to: strip the entire headstock.

    We were investigating the rear oil leak, stripped the clutch off in record time, and found that the seal was perfect. But we noticed that there was a missing grub screw which closed off the threaded removal hole for a blanking plate for one of the intermediate shafts. Doh! Simple fix though. It was an amazing lucky coincidence though that the screw was out, because in shifting the drivetrain around we could see the end of the shaft whopping about by over 1/16". This is a high speed bearing tapered roller bearing, running at almost input shaft speed. So we settled on the fact that if one is that bad, we really have to investigate all of them. We also found the middle "bearing" on the spindle, which is a brass bushing, was sliding around and not tight in it's housing. I think I will knurl it and turn it back to size.

    Does anyone have the manual for the 16" Herringbone version? Or have experience with tearing the headstock down? The herringbone uses tapered rollers as opposed to the dual-row angular contact of the spur model, so if we had the manual or a picture of the headstock diagram we could order bearings ahead of time. Either of those resources could save a lot of time.

    In the way of positive progress, I got the weird grinding on the handwheel brazed up. It is now ready be cleaned up and tapped for the new spinner. Ideally it would have had a push in replacement like the original, but we couldn't beat a metric threaded one for $4.



    -----------------------



    Hey mate, sorry I missed your post. Awesome machine! I wish ours was in 1/10th the shape yours is. Ours really should have been scrapped. Maybe still should. I used to think that no running, operating machine should be scrapped, but I have changed my opinion. We should have cut our losses a while back, though it still wouldn't be a bad time. We will have touched every single part and fastener by the time we are done. Replaced most every bearing. And it will still be a worn out lathe.

    I'd be curious to get get some pictures of the hard stop if we ever get ours going. Is it the revolving type?

    It looks like your speed plate is brass? I guess the cheeped out to the pot-metal tag in 43? Ours is all busted up.
    I would pull the spindle out and leave the high class bearings alone unless they are totally trashed which I doubt. pull the part numbers off all the little bearings in the headstock and when you order new ones buy -2RS sealed ones for all the ball bearings. Sealed bearings will last forever inside an oil sump. Manufacturers used to think open was better, but it's usually not.

    Or just put it back together and run it. A cheap worn out lathe is a lot better to use than one you sank a boatload of money into. If the headstock growls turn the stereo up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by excello942 View Post
    Clappedoutbport,

    The carriage stop is a screw with a graduated barrel that turns in the casting. I will post some pics.
    I am looking for pictures of the taper attachment bed clamp...mine is missing.

    Thanks,
    Excello
    No taper attachment here, so I can't be of assistance. I seem to remember seeing some pictures somewhere, I'll look around.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I would pull the spindle out and leave the high class bearings alone unless they are totally trashed which I doubt. pull the part numbers off all the little bearings in the headstock and when you order new ones buy -2RS sealed ones for all the ball bearings. Sealed bearings will last forever inside an oil sump. Manufacturers used to think open was better, but it's usually not.

    Or just put it back together and run it. A cheap worn out lathe is a lot better to use than one you sank a boatload of money into. If the headstock growls turn the stereo up.
    There are no ball bearings inside the headstock. 100% tapered roller as far as I can tell. I've never seen sealed ones of those. We will definitely fix the junk bearing, and inspect all the rest. Dad wants it quiet.

    Unless the Timkin has different tolerance spec bearings with the same model #, we can get the main spindle bearing for about $100. So it wouldn't be that bad. But yes, the less spent on a clapped out lathe the better. Seeing the condition off all the bearings on this lathe, they will likely be damaged.

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    Here are some picts of the carriage stop. The barrel is graduated in thousands at 50 per rev. The set screw on top is intended lock the barrel...seems to have suffered a hard life.

    In reference to the speed plate. My machine has 7 different brass plates. I guess early 1942 they still had brass in stock or could get it.

    micro-stop-3.jpgmicro-stop-1.jpgmicro-stop-2.jpg

    Thanks,
    Excello

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    Thanks for that. Yes it's interesting how we have all the other same brass plates except that one. Off all the ones they had to change, it's one of the more important ones. You'd think the "use a precision level" tag at then end of the ways would be the first to get the boot, but apparently not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    No taper attachment here, so I can't be of assistance. I seem to remember seeing some pictures somewhere, I'll look around.



    There are no ball bearings inside the headstock. 100% tapered roller as far as I can tell. I've never seen sealed ones of those. We will definitely fix the junk bearing, and inspect all the rest. Dad wants it quiet.

    Unless the Timkin has different tolerance spec bearings with the same model #, we can get the main spindle bearing for about $100. So it wouldn't be that bad. But yes, the less spent on a clapped out lathe the better. Seeing the condition off all the bearings on this lathe, they will likely be damaged.
    If they are tapered bearings they will have a means for adjustment. Just adjust them properly.

    When you said you had slop in the end of a shaft I assumed you were talking ball bearings since tapered bearings require you adjust them properly.

    And no, you most definitely cannot buy the spindle bearings for $100. Add a zero for each bearing and you're in the ballpark.

    Even if this lathe is a pile of junk you quite literally will turn it into scrap metal if you mis-handle the spindle and it's bearings. There's some real critical adjustments in there.

    I have worked on a gearbox with herringbone gears and it had critical adjustments for tooth alignment. I don't know how that lathe does it, but I sure hope you recognize the scope of what you're getting into here. It's not rocket science. Just be aware what you are getting into.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    If they are tapered bearings they will have a means for adjustment. Just adjust them properly.

    When you said you had slop in the end of a shaft I assumed you were talking ball bearings since tapered bearings require you adjust them properly.

    And no, you most definitely cannot buy the spindle bearings for $100. Add a zero for each bearing and you're in the ballpark.

    Even if this lathe is a pile of junk you quite literally will turn it into scrap metal if you mis-handle the spindle and it's bearings. There's some real critical adjustments in there.

    I have worked on a gearbox with herringbone gears and it had critical adjustments for tooth alignment. I don't know how that lathe does it, but I sure hope you recognize the scope of what you're getting into here. It's not rocket science. Just be aware what you are getting into.
    Respectfully disagree Garwood. That bearing cannot "just be tightened up". After running for so long with such lash, the rollers will no longer be straight anymore, but will have been ground into an arch. Think of how much metal has been removed to allow that bearing to have 1/16" of slop. I do not think the locknut has backed off, and I do not think someone has been into it before.

    As far as bearing prices, you are telling me I'm wrong, but I've priced them. Using the manual here (with the assumption the 16 speed uses the same bearings: http://midiesel.com/sidney.pdf
    It shows the front spindle bearing as a Timken 6461-6420.
    The rear bearing is a Timken 5555-552A.

    Front:
    $106 Timken SET423 Bearing 6461A-6420
    $178 Timken 6461 Tapered Roller Bearing | eBay + TIMKEN 6420 TAPERED ROLLER BEARING CUP | eBay

    And for the rear
    $80 TIMKEN 5555-552A BEARING/RACE SET NEW 53893053011 | eBay

    Now, yes, you're about to tell me that the bearings in the lathe are a higher precision class, probably class 3's like this set for $500 https://www.ebay.com/itm/TIMKEN-6461...-/231566649018

    But frankly, We really wouldn't care about the precision class. Whether it has 1/2 a thou of runout vs a tenth, the lathe is so worn out it won't matter anyway. And the lower precision class bearing may be better than what is in there right now. It's not like we're going to go and start yanking races out, but if they're trashed then they're trashed.

    I don't want to come off too brash, but I have done a little homework. If I'm really off base and the lower precision bearings are far worse than I think, please do let me know. But I've never known any timken bearing to be crap, even low grade ones.

    As far as the herringbones go, they seem to float on the spindle so it shouldn't be to difficult. I could slide the whole set around which is how I found out the middle brass bushing was spinning in the housing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    Respectfully disagree Garwood. That bearing cannot "just be tightened up". After running for so long with such lash, the rollers will no longer be straight anymore, but will have been ground into an arch. Think of how much metal has been removed to allow that bearing to have 1/16" of slop. I do not think the locknut has backed off, and I do not think someone has been into it before.

    As far as bearing prices, you are telling me I'm wrong, but I've priced them. Using the manual here (with the assumption the 16 speed uses the same bearings: http://midiesel.com/sidney.pdf
    It shows the front spindle bearing as a Timken 6461-6420.
    The rear bearing is a Timken 5555-552A.

    Front:
    $106 Timken SET423 Bearing 6461A-6420
    $178 Timken 6461 Tapered Roller Bearing | eBay + TIMKEN 6420 TAPERED ROLLER BEARING CUP | eBay

    And for the rear
    $80 TIMKEN 5555-552A BEARING/RACE SET NEW 53893053011 | eBay

    Now, yes, you're about to tell me that the bearings in the lathe are a higher precision class, probably class 3's like this set for $500 https://www.ebay.com/itm/TIMKEN-6461...-/231566649018

    But frankly, We really wouldn't care about the precision class. Whether it has 1/2 a thou of runout vs a tenth, the lathe is so worn out it won't matter anyway. And the lower precision class bearing may be better than what is in there right now. It's not like we're going to go and start yanking races out, but if they're trashed then they're trashed.

    I don't want to come off too brash, but I have done a little homework. If I'm really off base and the lower precision bearings are far worse than I think, please do let me know. But I've never known any timken bearing to be crap, even low grade ones.

    As far as the herringbones go, they seem to float on the spindle so it shouldn't be to difficult. I could slide the whole set around which is how I found out the middle brass bushing was spinning in the housing.
    keep this up...you'll be teaching sid's class pretty soon!!good work...

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    Ask yourself what the future holds for this lathe. You've put this much time and effort into it. Do you want to regrind and truly refurbish it at some point? If you do, do yourself a favor and rebuild the headstock right this time around and you won't have to get back into it. Rebuild it wrong and it will either frustrate you during use (bearing runout has different and sometimes more perplexing - from the operator's perspective - consequences than than worn out ways) OR it will do serious damage to the internals, making a future rebuild that much more difficult / impossible.

    If this will also be a "junker" lathe, than yeah - do whatever you want! I've seen guys take some of this old, clapped out heavy iron and turn them into welding rotisseries, in which case you don't care at all about runout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post

    But frankly, We really wouldn't care about the precision class. Whether it has 1/2 a thou of runout vs a tenth, the lathe is so worn out it won't matter anyway. And the lower precision class bearing may be better than what is in there right now. It's not like we're going to go and start yanking races out, but if they're trashed then they're trashed.

    I don't want to come off too brash, but I have done a little homework. If I'm really off base and the lower precision bearings are far worse than I think, please do let me know. But I've never known any timken bearing to be crap, even low grade ones.
    Class 3 is the lowest grade of precision bearings. I doubt that's what's in there.

    Might benefit you to research spindle bearings a bit. Lots of good info on this site about what they are and how to set them up.

    It's not too difficult to make excellent parts on a lathe that has wasted ways. A lathe with a sloppy spindle is trash though. There is absolutely no point in having it unless it's going to be a weld positioner or a flower pot.

    If the tapered bearings not on the spindle that ran loose are fretted or pitted then toss them. otherwise they are probably fine for what they do. Kind of common sense I guess, but you seem to think it would matter if there was uneven wear. It kinda does, but really just matters how you set them up. I would set up new bearings with less clearance than used ones.

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    Here are the Timken scans on the Class subject. Commonly installed (spindle) Class 0 are TEN PERCENT of the assembled run out of Class 2 gear box bearings
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails assembled-runout.jpg   assembeld-runout-crop.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Class 3 is the lowest grade of precision bearings. I doubt that's what's in there.

    Might benefit you to research spindle bearings a bit. Lots of good info on this site about what they are and how to set them up.

    It's not too difficult to make excellent parts on a lathe that has wasted ways. A lathe with a sloppy spindle is trash though. There is absolutely no point in having it unless it's going to be a weld positioner or a flower pot.

    If the tapered bearings not on the spindle that ran loose are fretted or pitted then toss them. otherwise they are probably fine for what they do. Kind of common sense I guess, but you seem to think it would matter if there was uneven wear. It kinda does, but really just matters how you set them up. I would set up new bearings with less clearance than used ones.
    Well I appreciate y'all coming back even if I am well off base. I don't think gearbox grade bearings are as bad as you guys make them out to be, but I don't think we'll need them either. I've been wrong a lot so far, so I may be here too.

    Dad got the loose bearings on the intermediate shaft out, and I was wrong there. Someone has been into it before, and they left it loose. (Or the nut slipped.) The nuts are way down in there and it's nigh impossible to turn without a custom tool, so they used a chisel. The bearings weren't actually that bad, but they do have small lines of corrosion from when the machine sat (outside probably) for a long time. All the bearings have looked this way, so it's probable that the spindle bearings are too. Dad has new bearings on the way for this shaft.

    The brass bushing is keyed, so it hasn't spun like I thought it had. Just a slip fit, so it can move around slightly along with the whole gear stack. So, the only other reason to pull the spindle be for cleaning and poking at the spindle drain. Hopefully it will clear up, or we can reduce the flow to the bearing I guess. Dad said it was getting better and only really did in high gear, so we'll see. I realize now that some of the line were not exactly pointed correctly. @excello942, if you have a higher resolution photo of your gearbox that would be awesome.

    We also found one wiggly drivetrain gear which ran up against the loose shaft, but itís just going to have to deal with it for now.

    TL;DR, some gearbox damage, but no need to strip it just yet.

    To solve the problem of tightening up the nuts, I made a few custom tools. Iím starting to get a small collection of these tools now, so if anyone needs to do any headstock work, I can probably save you a significant amount of time.

    img_3130.jpg

    img_3132.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_3130.jpg   img_3132.jpg  


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