American Pacemaker 16x30 - First lathe - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    A thread on load capacity of lathes, link to another similar thread in it:
    Lathe Weight Capacity?

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    Well, i was more worried about the end of the spindle bending because it's unsupported at the end, but i'm feeling more comfortable at this point. I have packed a come along. Only need to round up load binders before 6. Heading out in a few minutes. Think i packed everything i need.

    thanks much for the advice, i'll post pics as soon as i can!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 86turbodsl View Post
    Well, i was more worried about the end of the spindle bending because it's unsupported at the end,
    That could be a valid concern, actually.

    I might rig from the base in an inverted vee. Then again, that's why I have all that new chain in tubs. Easier to re-purpose, next go, if one just belays the surplus rather than cut it.

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    Move is done. Went well. I used the bar through the spindle as recommended. The lift was made by a boom truck. It was near max load though! The guy commented it was HEAVY. And this was without a motor cover casting! BTW, does anybody know where i can get one?

    The lathe wasn't happy until we also strapped the bed towards the tailstock. Then it lifted fairly level. We flew through the air about 50 ft and onto the trailer. I had the pallet parts laid out as shown in the photo. We moved things around a little bit as we gently lowered it down. The lathe does look a little forward because it is. The deck is curved, i tried to keep it towards the flatter part of the deck. I paid for it though. More on that later.

    Once the lathe was sitting on the 4x6's, i screwed lags through all 4 corners of each pallet, then screwed wood blocking on 3 sides of each pedestal. Then i strapped down all 4 corners with the 10K straps, carefully cutting carpet hunks on any metal surface. I'll try and get some photos of that in a bit.

    Cinched everything down good and went for a short ride to the gas station to wash hands. then a bit longer to grab some food. No issues anywhere. Noticed my trailer brakes not working. Ugh. I just put a bunch of work into the wiring to AVOID that. Ok, taking it super easy. After lunch, checked all straps and rigging, no issues, drive to I69, jump on and go. You can tell there's a load back there, but the truck handled it well. Until we got to some concrete roadway on I69, where it bucked hard enough to loosen my teeth for a few miles. Glad to get past that mess. Most of the rest of the way home, no issues. Stopped for gas almost home, got 13.7mpg hauling 10K lbs! Trailer and lathe. We're home and i need to get the shop cleaned out so i can get the lathe unloaded. With the thorough rigging i did, it didn't move a millimeter. I'm super happy about how it all went. Once i get it unloaded into the shop, I'll be fabbing some machinery skates to get it over to where i want it. I have a lot to do before sunday night... LOL.

    Pics of the move:

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  6. #65
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    Any landing you can walk away from (only 400, here. Small beans to my mates as left-set "heavies" for their crust, Cathay & such.).. or any rig where you do not break goods, gear, skin, nor even a sweat.. is a good 'un.

    Good on yah!

    Here. Who has TIME to fab - or even scout materials - for what is already known-useful, and even on sale:

    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...3818_200673818

    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...9288_200679288

    That one has built-in latches to form into a "magic carpet" of arbitrary width and length, even manages a rough and summer-soft asphalt driveway.

    I have "many" of each, some of the hard-roller ones drilled for center pivots, then permanently attached.

    Two will do yah. Place them center mass, long-axis, one each short-axis side so yah can pivot a load on its vertical axis, lower-strength casters fore and aft, long axis that do not QUITE touch the deck until needed to do as the surface dinds bumps or center-mass is intentionally altered for steering with shift of a modest weight or cranking the carriage.

    "Dog paddle' the load with an "oar" of 4-foot or so 2-by as git-along, and one man can put the load 'bout anywhere, and at any angle.

    Slow, but not strenuous, and works a treat.

  7. #66
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    Neither one of those links goes anywhere but the main page. Not sure what you're proposing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 86turbodsl View Post
    Neither one of those links goes anywhere but the main page. Not sure what you're proposing.
    Check your bowser. Each goes directly to one skate, Firefox, OpenBSD.

    Or browse to:

    Material Handling
    >Dollies + Movers
    >Machinery Movers + Accessories
    >
    then
    Item# 52417
    Item# 52418

    Not professional-grade Hillmans, but I don't USE them as often, either.

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    Wow, first one is basically what i was going to build. Still have to check my costs. Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 86turbodsl View Post
    Wow, first one is basically what i was going to build. Still have to check my costs. Thanks!
    "Priorities", mate.

    As with many things, rubber tires and decent wheels to F-150's sitting atop them, the TRUE "cost" is that DIY even when we know how and CAN do, robs you of time to build some OTHER thing that one CANNOT easily "just buy, ready to use".

    Northern, BTW, is a better grade of imports than HF. Same stuff industrial China - sort of a nation of pragmatic tight with their money redneck mechanics and dirt farmers in their own way - use at home.

    HF sells goods the Chinese will NOT buy - only penny-wise and pound foolish Americans thinking they are saving more money than they waste on too much of it.


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    Those drop deck trailers are just awesome. Two pallet jacks worked amazing to roll into shop. Just jacked up one end and controlled speed of the move by jacking up the other and dropping as speed picked up.

    She's home!

    Sent from my LG-TP450 using Tapatalk

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    Nice job getting it home. Now it looks like the bigger job will be to clear a place for it to live.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Nice job getting it home. Now it looks like the bigger job will be to clear a place for it to live.
    Truth. I started cleaning it up with pb blaster and a razor blade can still see some markings on some of the ways. I can also see some dings from people dropping things on the ways. Is scotchbrite ok for cleaning?

    Sent from my LG-TP450 using Tapatalk

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    Scotchbrite is not recommended to use on ways, people do it. Remove all of the rust as you can, a carbide scraper blade ground straight, can work too. After you remove all of the rust as you can, get you a oil stone or a chunk from one that is broken, say 2" x 3-4", soaked in mineral spirits, start honing the ways reasonably smooth. Keep the surfaces saturated with mineral spirits while honing. When done, wash off with fresh mineral spirits. Coat with oil. This is my general method of cleaning ways surfaces until the next step of determining to rescrape or remachine of ways. Ken

    BTY good luck on you new toy! Lots of good information and people here that can help and have been into these lathes over the years.

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    Congrats on the safe move. The first time you move a heavy machine, it's always a bit daunting, but we all learn from doing. Glad you didn't have any incidents.

    My first move of a reasonably heavy lathe was a 2800 lb. Hendey 9 years ago. At the time, I was extremely intimidated, but as we do these things more frequently, we learn quickly what works well. You can move a lot of weight with 2 pallet jacks if you're careful, and make sure to not get the load up high. Lathes, as you now know, are top heavy and tippy. Putting a larger, sturdy "pallet" out of timber, like you did, and strapping said machine to it, makes everything go a lot smoother.

    It's always the tight wads that try to make these moves spending no money on support tools and gear that get themselves into trouble. For every "hero story" out there from the guy who tells you to use your truck jack, 2 pieces of pipe, and a pry bar, because he was successful, is a litany of "other" stories of the guys who dumped their machines over because they couldn't part with a couple bucks to do it safely.

    Now the real fun begins. Assessing that Pacemaker lathe to see what you have. They are absolutely great lathes, as I've got a few friends who put out a ton of great job shop work on them. I love my Monarch, but wouldn't hesitate to add a Pacemaker to my shop if one ever became available in the right circumstance. Worthy of a great rebuild project.

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  20. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawkfan9 View Post
    You can move a lot of weight with 2 pallet jacks if you're careful, and make sure to not get the load up high. Lathes, as you now know, are top heavy and tippy. Putting a larger, sturdy "pallet" out of timber, like you did, and strapping said machine to it, makes everything go a lot smoother.

    It's always the tight wads that try to make these moves spending no money on support tools and gear that get themselves into trouble. For every "hero story" out there from the guy who tells you to use your truck jack, 2 pieces of pipe, and a pry bar, because he was successful, is a litany of "other" stories of the guys who dumped their machines over because they couldn't part with a couple bucks to do it safely.

    Now the real fun begins. Assessing that Pacemaker lathe to see what you have. They are absolutely great lathes, as I've got a few friends who put out a ton of great job shop work on them. I love my Monarch, but wouldn't hesitate to add a Pacemaker to my shop if one ever became available in the right circumstance. Worthy of a great rebuild project.
    Thanks. I was really happy i spent the money on the timbers. When i jacked the lathe up on the pallet jacks, it tipped side to side a bit, but with the outriggers on there, went nowhere of course. The pallet jacks were also properly loaded as designed. Belt and suspenders approach is my motto on stuff of this nature. I have no experience moving something so heavy, so i played it safe as possible. I've also become a HUGE fan of drop deck trailers. That thing dropped right down on the concrete and made the move off super easy. My kid didn't even have to steer really. It just glided off as i jacked the headstock up. I had quote of 300 for a boom truck on my end, and the trailer rental was 1/3 of that. Money well spent i think.

    I have soaked most of the exposed fasteners down with pb blaster. I think i will continue to do that for a few days while i plan the machinery skate move to the appointed part of the shop. I think i'm going to have to pull the apron to get it to move. It doesn't budge.

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    I'd have pushed that lathe right out of the way and hooked onto the arbor press behind it!

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    if you have any questions on taking things apart feel free to send me a text. when i got my 1944 16x54 pacemaker i pulled almost everything apart and stripped it down to bare steel and repainted it along with fixing a few thing that had been messed with over the later 80 years. my number is 406-860-3033.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 86turbodsl View Post
    Is scotchbrite ok for cleaning?
    More types of scrapers and more patience be better. Not as if you have to do this once a week after the first good run. Take care of it, might not be needed again until some years after you no longer care.

    Scotchbrite is nothing more complicated than abrasive particles trapped in an elastomer matrix.

    As it works, the abrasive particles are released. Sounds like sandpaper with somewhat reduced obvious need for cleanup, but stray abrasive particles all the same?

    IOW "non-abrasive? My ass!"



    Truth told, steel wool debris might even be easier to get out and less harmful if trapped. Not that I'd want to use it, just sayin'.

    I DO make use of bristle brushes - Bronze wire ones most of all. The bristles get used-up instead of the precision of the surfaces of Iron or steel - same as cleaning the bores of firearms.

    Works for me.

    NON precision portions? Cover doors, pedestal surfaces? Sides of the bed, outside of the HS & TS castings?

    Whatever works. Even needle scalers, media or soda blasting.

    DO mind protecting stuff - so the debris, water, corrosives, do NOT get back to the itty-fitty-parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I'd have pushed that lathe right out of the way and hooked onto the arbor press behind it!
    That arbor press went into the dumpster right behind the truck. Nobody wanted it.

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    I've been working on the lathe the last couple of days. I started scraping ways with a razor blade at about a 90 degree angle from the way surface. Also bought a bunch of pb blaster and have been hosing all fasteners down regularly.

    I can report that things are freeing up nicely!

    I removed the headstock tonight and have completely freed up the feed box. I'm continuing to hose everything down with penetrant. Also the tailstock is no longer frozen. Removed the threading dial and got it soaking. The taper attachment seems to have taken the brunt of the rust. I think that it needs to come apart before the apron comes off if i'm seeing how it all works together properly.


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