Axleson Lathe purchase - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 57
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1717
    Likes (Received)
    1828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drom68 View Post
    No real information on it right now. Need to see it in person. The owner said it is dirty/dusty and not rusty, ran at a shop he was at a long time ago- nice and tight.

    Any thoughts on this other than run. Cost is low, owner wants it gone. Attachment 177917Attachment 177918
    did you end up buying it? I still see it on CL.


    dee
    ;-D

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,900
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4213
    Likes (Received)
    1969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    I have not seen a Axleson of that size up close so this is my observation only. The Monarch lathes you are comparing are most likely 60/61's and maybe N or CK? Reason I ask is my series 62 is pretty stout, two speed tail stock, rapids, 14-1750 RPM 32 speed head, nice size knobs, leadscrew reverse, braking and, jog. The only real issue is the small through hole in the spindle about 2 1/4". My lathe is a 2013 but, the 1611 are not much less machine.

    Steve
    My Axelson was used along side a pair of 61 series Monarchs. The Monarchs were beat. They had the same hardened ways as the 62 series.

    My points are:

    1) A Monarch of any series does not have a dramatic advantage or superiority over an Axelson.

    2) Axelsons had standard features that other makers offered as options or not at all.

    3) Axelson's beefy controls are nice to use and some prefer them to other lathes with little levers and knobs.


    Did 62 series Monarchs ever include insert ways? Can you run the tailstock rack out the rear? Does it have a way to lock the tailstock down other than the single lever or do you have to fiddle with adjustment stuff when you really need to push something?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4622

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    My Axelson was used along side a pair of 61 series Monarchs. The Monarchs were beat. They had the same hardened ways as the 62 series.

    My points are:

    1) A Monarch of any series does not have a dramatic advantage or superiority over an Axelson.

    2) Axelsons had standard features that other makers offered as options or not at all.

    3) Axelson's beefy controls are nice to use and some prefer them to other lathes with little levers and knobs.


    Did 62 series Monarchs ever include insert ways? Can you run the tailstock rack out the rear? Does it have a way to lock the tailstock down other than the single lever or do you have to fiddle with adjustment stuff when you really need to push something?
    Not to argue THAT point, but 6X Series Monarch are not what I'd compare an Axelson with to begin with, sitting alongside in any given machine-hall or no.

    Nor Lodge & Shipley's entry-level machines, the compact Powerturns.

    The comparison would be to the middle-sized Lodge & Shipley. The Superturn.

    Not sure who wins. Wudda been glad to have had EITHER in place of a Niles.

    If wishes were fishes, sure would have been nice to have to run a year's worth of comparison testing, both factory-new, too!

    Bill

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Woodland Hills, Ca. and some times Hutchinson, Ks.
    Posts
    2,266
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    My Axelson was used along side a pair of 61 series Monarchs. The Monarchs were beat. They had the same hardened ways as the 62 series.

    My points are:

    1) A Monarch of any series does not have a dramatic advantage or superiority over an Axelson.

    2) Axelsons had standard features that other makers offered as options or not at all.

    3) Axelson's beefy controls are nice to use and some prefer them to other lathes with little levers and knobs.


    Did 62 series Monarchs ever include insert ways? Can you run the tailstock rack out the rear? Does it have a way to lock the tailstock down other than the single lever or do you have to fiddle with adjustment stuff when you really need to push something?
    I never said or even implied that the Monarchs were superior to Axleson, my comments were more of a question of comparing apples and oranges. The series 62 are quite a bit beefier than the 60/61's, no Monarchs have inserted ways, the tail stock has a clamping nut along with the lever, the spindle does not extend rearward.

    I know there were a few makers that used tool steel way inserts, that sounds great but, what is the bearing surface on the saddle? I don't wish to degrade either machine, I will say that for a 57 year old machine that lived at Humble then Mobil oil it is in remarkable shape. The wear on the bed is minimal at best, cross slide has some wear but the long ways are great. One thing that any machine can't tolerate is poor lube management.

    You like your Axleson and I agree it sounds like a fine lathe, the levers and knobs feel right, I completely understand. I have three Monarch lathes and one of the things I like about them is the levers, knobs and tactile feel. Having a family of machines gives you a familiarity with them, control location and actions etc.

    In the golden era of manual lathes there were a handful of builders in the US that made the best of the best, Axleson along with Monarch, Lodge & Shipley, ATW and LeBlond. That doesn't diminish Axleson or the others, every maker had its niche.

    Steve

  5. Likes Garwood liked this post
  6. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    13,205
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6563
    Likes (Received)
    2542

    Default

    I'll assure you that you will never work and Axleson or any other lathe of that ilk (Monarch, Pacemaker, LeBlond, L&S or even Sydney) to its full capacity. Even when you think you are running it for all it is worth, you can run the numbers and find you are probably no more than about 2/3 rated hp. Even at that point they get real scary to be near. 99.999% of the time, the work, the tooling or your ability to hold either is going to be the limit, long before the machine says Uncle.

  7. Likes malcolm rypauf, Garwood, Reeltor liked this post
  8. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4622

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    I'll assure you that you will never work and Axleson or any other lathe of that ilk (Monarch, Pacemaker, LeBlond, L&S or even Sydney) to its full capacity. Even when you think you are running it for all it is worth, you can run the numbers and find you are probably no more than about 2/3 rated hp. Even at that point they get real scary to be near. 99.999% of the time, the work, the tooling or your ability to hold either is going to be the limit, long before the machine says Uncle.
    LOL! Thats why the remark about kneepads. Didn't have those. Drooled over them on the covers of "American Machinist" or such.

    What we HAD were mostly Niles-Bement-Pond or even PRE conglomerate names. 'New' late 1890's into the immediate pre-WWII era Lodge & Shipley, and all still working 3 shifts a day through 1965. Later-yet, I am sure, but I had moved-on.

    As I've said before "China used to be in West Virginia".

    Those dinosaurs were pushed to the wall on 2-degree-negative-rake inserted carbides (all we could afford) or gentler Rex 95 even with up-motoring to 25 and 50 HP and "Dinosaur Current" at that on the biggest ones. Nature of the work we were asked to do. Too busy trying to keep all our body parts in one package to consider it heroic. Just punch the clock and sweat through yet another shift.

    Bill

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    VA, USA
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    56
    Likes (Received)
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dcsipo View Post
    did you end up buying it? I still see it on CL.


    dee
    ;-D
    Not yet, I will pick it up later this week or next week. He said he would hold it for me, I have to figure out how I am going to load the lathe. He doesn't have anything to lift with. I do have a tilt bed trailer I can use, but I would rather lift and place on the trailer.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4622

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drom68 View Post
    Not yet, I will pick it up later this week or next week. He said he would hold it for me, I have to figure out how I am going to load the lathe. He doesn't have anything to lift with. I do have a tilt bed trailer I can use, but I would rather lift and place on the trailer.
    Loading, I'd suggest stout slings, choked for no unwanted tilt, and the LOCAL callout and r/t per-mile of a turret-type wrecker or light road-mobile crane.

    The big wreckers that recover over-the -road tractor-trailer rigs that have gone down over embankments & c. can lift that Axelson with plenty of safe reserve. Search for photos in Abom79's 'my shop' thread moving heavy lathes & c. that way.

    UNloading from a tilt-bed you can take your time and DIY with skids, skates, rollers, even sheet iron and grease or soap.

    Bill

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    VA, USA
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    56
    Likes (Received)
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    I'll assure you that you will never work and Axleson or any other lathe of that ilk (Monarch, Pacemaker, LeBlond, L&S or even Sydney) to its full capacity. Even when you think you are running it for all it is worth, you can run the numbers and find you are probably no more than about 2/3 rated hp. Even at that point they get real scary to be near. 99.999% of the time, the work, the tooling or your ability to hold either is going to be the limit, long before the machine says Uncle.
    That's what I was thinking, how does one work a lathe of this type to its full potential. So any lathe, Monarch or XXX would be working at a comfortable pace while the individual would be taxed out wondering how much more they could actually do or maybe there are people that can keep up....

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,268
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5843
    Likes (Received)
    4622

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drom68 View Post
    That's what I was thinking, how does one work a lathe of this type to its full potential. So any lathe, Monarch or XXX would be working at a comfortable pace while the individual would be taxed out wondering how much more they could actually do or maybe there are people that can keep up....
    By this time of this century? None of the above. Three-shift 'war 'work' prolly ain't on your radar.

    Just be happy you have a sound machine with lots of reserve and enough life left in it it will stay that way for the duration of your need of it.

    It ain't a Wife and Mother of yer kids, after all.


    Bill

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,404
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1717
    Likes (Received)
    1828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drom68 View Post
    Not yet, I will pick it up later this week or next week. He said he would hold it for me, I have to figure out how I am going to load the lathe. He doesn't have anything to lift with. I do have a tilt bed trailer I can use, but I would rather lift and place on the trailer.
    I would get one of those trailer winches you have on boat trailers, I would think a 3000 lb capacity will do the job. (remember the force to pull up on the ramp is = the the weight* sin of angle + friction coeff * cos angle * weight. keep it on rollers so you can almost eliminate the friction and you end up with the sin angle * weight. as long as you pulling up on less than 30 degrees it is less than half the weight.)


    Amazon.com: Fulton FW3211 F2 Two-Speed Trailer Winch with Strap - 32 lb. Load Capacity: Fulton: Automotive

    It would also help you unload as well. Good luck moving it, be safe and pictures, loads of pictures, please.


    dee
    ;-D

  14. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,563
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2611
    Likes (Received)
    1968

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drom68 View Post
    Not yet, I will pick it up later this week or next week. He said he would hold it for me, I have to figure out how I am going to load the lathe. He doesn't have anything to lift with. I do have a tilt bed trailer I can use, but I would rather lift and place on the trailer.
    I strongly suggest you make up a pair of theses...

    axelson1.jpg

    axelson.jpg

    20140325_104835.jpg

    Makes it easy to move an Axelson around without breaking off any of the legs.. I lift the base up a few inches with a 5 foot prybar and a few blocks of wood, Slide the rails in place and bolt the halves together then lower the assembly onto some roller pipes...

    I used a tilt bed gooseneck trailer to move mine but a tilt bed wrecker would also do the job. The skid assembly allows for places to attach the winch without damaging the lathe. I also added stuby outriggers to prevent tipping of the machine..

    I would almost kill for the steady rest

  15. Likes cranium liked this post
  16. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    VA, USA
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    56
    Likes (Received)
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I strongly suggest you make up a pair of theses...


    Makes it easy to move an Axelson around without breaking off any of the legs.. I lift the base up a few inches with a 5 foot prybar and a few blocks of wood, Slide the rails in place and bolt the halves together then lower the assembly onto some roller pipes...


    I would almost kill for the steady rest
    What size lathe is that?

    Nice looking set up. How does the lathe set on the rails, I can come up with a few ideas, but wondering how you did it. I have material left over from a job that would be perfect for this.

    As for the steady rest.... I do have a steady rest that looks very similar to the one on the lathe. I picked it up at a local scrap yard, heard they had an old lathe they were scrapping. I was too late as the lathe was crushed and gone, the only thing left was the steady rest.


    dcsipo, good idea. I have a winch that I can use and will have it on hand. Ill grab some pics and post when the time comes.

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,563
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2611
    Likes (Received)
    1968

    Default

    it's a 16 x 30 same as yours just shorter bed..

    The rails have a 1.5 inch angle welded to them about 1 inch off the bottom. You lift the lathe up 2 inches then place the rails on each side with the angle under each pedestal. Then you place the 4 2x2" cross braces , one on each side of the pedestal and bolt them in.. The braces keep the base from moving around and the angle iron supports the weight.

    Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Damascus, MD
    Posts
    1,389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3948
    Likes (Received)
    787

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I strongly suggest you make up a pair of theses...

    Makes it easy to move an Axelson around without breaking off any of the legs.. I lift the base up a few inches with a 5 foot prybar and a few blocks of wood, Slide the rails in place and bolt the halves together then lower the assembly onto some roller pipes...

    I used a tilt bed gooseneck trailer to move mine but a tilt bed wrecker would also do the job. The skid assembly allows for places to attach the winch without damaging the lathe. I also added stuby outriggers to prevent tipping of the machine..

    I would almost kill for the steady rest
    It looks like a very nice setup. The only objection I have is that I'd have removed the pipes from under the lathe before strapping it on the trailer. Personally, with any heavy load I like to have as much friction and blocking as possible between the machine and the trailer and not just relying on the ties.

    Paolo

  19. Likes Demon73 liked this post
  20. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    N.E. PA
    Posts
    802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    85
    Likes (Received)
    249

    Default

    I remember seeing an Axelson lathe for sale on one of the government auctions from Norfolk Navy yard several years ago. It was a big one with a couple of steady rests and about 250 " C to C and about 40 inchs over the cross slide. The thing was sitting outside and all rusted pretty bad from the pictures. The bid went for 35000.00.

    John

  21. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,563
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2611
    Likes (Received)
    1968

    Default

    I see the larger ones on Ebay a lot... 4500 for this one...arrowheadmach | eBay

    Even larger ones not much more than 7000.

    NEVER see a steady for a 16" though

    That is one thing you have to resign yourself to, few, more like NO spare parts...

  22. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,563
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2611
    Likes (Received)
    1968

    Default

    Forgot to mention.... You are going to need one of these also...

    20141213_134848_resized_1.jpg

    20141213_134603_resized.jpg

    20141213_134823_resized.jpg

    When you start using lathes of this size everything gets much heavier. I have 4 different chucks ( 10" to 18") a collet chuck and 6 different face plates. I can barely install the 10" chucks by hand, it is a struggle. The 18" 4 jaw must have a lift of some sort. My little gantry crane makes changing chucks a 1 man, 10 minute job.

  23. Likes Paolo_MD liked this post
  24. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Navasota / Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    3,563
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2611
    Likes (Received)
    1968

    Default

    Another thing you might consider is raising your lathe.

    20160109_213027_resized.jpg20160109_213102_resized.jpg


    I'm 5'10" and the clutch levers on the apron are hard to work when the lathe is sitting on the floor. I was always scraping my hand on the underside of the wheel. I made up 8, 6" cylinders that were 5" tall and lifted the lathe up on to them. It also really made a difference in the way my back feels at the end of the day...

  25. Likes Paolo_MD liked this post
  26. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    VA, USA
    Posts
    291
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    56
    Likes (Received)
    100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    Another thing you might consider is raising your lathe.

    20160109_213027_resized.jpg20160109_213102_resized.jpg
    Thanks for the idea. Can you provide the dimensions for the base of the lathe. I am looking to do the same thing, but a bit different.

    Thanks,

    slide1.jpg


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •