Cincinatt Arrow 750 - potential spindle drive death
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  1. #1
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    Default Cincinatt Arrow 750 - potential spindle drive death

    Hey guys, recently acquired an Arrow 750 and thanks to the grand help from folk on this forum I managed to get it up and running and made few bits with her, but I've now run into spindle problems, it intermittently won't run.
    The problem just came out of nowhere, or it might be attributed to a crash... So I did have a crash, nothing too heavy I don't think. The Z was rapid down and the tool length was incorrect, so the tool holder hit the piece in the vice. The spindle wasn't turning for this one. Everything seemed to be ok and I carried on. Had a second semi-crash where the tool wasn't long enough for the pocket it was helixing into, and again the tool holder hit the piece in the vice. The spindle was on for this one but I managed to hit the emergency stop before things got too wild, surely no more load than a heavy cut?

    Then one day I switched her on and during alignment, the spindle turned a small amount and then nothing else. Turned off and on again but no luck. The next day she fired up just fine but wouldn't give the spindle high RPM's. The next day she worked fine and I made a few bits and she died mid-program. The next day wouldn't even move the spindle for alignment. The next day worked all good all day. The next day she moved a small amount during alignment and now here I am...

    The warning that comes up is;

    Alarm 39-97
    Spindle drive not ready
    Cause 1: The spindle enable signal is not on, but the spindle drive ready signal is on. It should not be on at this time
    Cause2: The spindle enable signal has been set on, but the spindle drive ready signal has not been received.

    I have spoken to my machine engineers and they have said I can take the spindle drive out and send it up to them for testing to see if it's actually the spindle drive causing the fault, but figured I put some feelers out here as well. The fact it has been intermittent has me questioning whether it's a drive fault, or a loose connection caused by the crash, or some dirt has been shaken loose by the vibrations?

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    I know nothing about your machine, but if the drive relies on a speed sensor signal from the motor there's a good chance it's not starting because it doesn't see the signal.

    If it starts to spin, but then stops with an alarm this is a possibility. If it doesn't start at all with an overload alarm that would be more indicative of failed IGBT's, bad motor or bad cabling.

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    Following Garwood comments: when it doesn't start, have you tried powering it off, rotate the spindle and try again? My thought is that, if there is an encoder disk to sense the angular position and speed of the spindle, there might be a "bad spot".

    Paolo

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    I think you guys are onto something.
    There are three sensors on the spindle, two have red lights and the third does not light up...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Following Garwood comments: when it doesn't start, have you tried powering it off, rotate the spindle and try again? My thought is that, if there is an encoder disk to sense the angular position and speed of the spindle, there might be a "bad spot".

    Paolo
    The ones I have experience with use a metallic trigger wheel with teeth and magnetic sensor to generate a sinusoidal waveform signal. Usually two overlapping waveforms 90 degrees apart. 90, not 180 degrees so the motor direction can be determined by the signal.

    The drive amplifies these analog signals and converts them to a square waveform used by the drive electronics to determine motion, speed and direction of rotation.

    Typically the drive manufacturer will have a procedure to troubleshoot this signal with an o-scope.


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