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Thread: Cincinnati 2ML

  1. #1
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    Default Cincinnati 2ML

    So a few weeks ago a Cincinnati 2ML followed me home mere steps ahead of a trip to the scrapper.

    20160826_171705.jpg20160826_171714.jpg

    I've been doing some general cleaning and taking care of some issues I've found. One of those issues was a broken stud on the vertical head. I have pulled the head off (where it angles down in the picture) but there is no obvious way to get the ring which retains the studs off.

    While I have the service manual for the 2ML mill, it makes no reference to the vertical head. Which means I have no drawings showing how deeply I need to dig in to get this repaired.

    I would be extremely grateful for any help that could be provided.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20160826_171638.jpg   20160826_171642.jpg   20160826_171645.jpg  

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    I am assuming you mean the bolts / nuts that hold the head on to the ram? Those are T-bolts that ride inside a T-slot. Usually in the slot the is a opening where you can move the T-Bolt around to the hole and pull out the T-bolt. A picture of the what your describing would help.
    Last edited by Richard King; 09-07-2016 at 06:25 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard King View Post
    I am assuming you mean the bolts / nuts that hold the head on to the ram? Those are T-bolts that ride inside a T-slot.
    Yes, that is what I was referring to and, yes, they are t-bolts.

    Usually in the shot the is a opening where you can move the T-Bolt around to the hole and pull out the T-bolt. A picture of the what your describing would help.
    There isn't a front slot in this one, there is one in the back. The round clearance holes are to get out the bolts that I suspect hold this plate on.

    20160906_191043.jpg

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    Looks like the bolts you removed plus dowel pins hold it on. make a slide hammer that use a long nut like you use on a Mill hold down extension or regular nut and slide the tee nut around the slot and pull it out. Sometimes the clearance hole for the hold down bolts are or can be tapped to put in a puller bolt.

    PS: For those who are learning to scrape, look at the ring, it has been scraped to get the headstock alignment

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard King View Post
    PS: For those who are learning to scrape, look at the ring, it has been scraped to get the headstock alignment
    There is also pristine scraping on the head itself. It doesn't look like it has been moved much.

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    Eremius,
    Before giving you any suggestion, I would need to see more pictures, especially on the back of that part.
    I strongly believe that the T-bolts need to come out from the hole in the back at 12 o'clock (9 o'clock in the crooked picture). But how to get that hole open, that is what you have to remove and in which order is not 100% clear to me. For instance: is it a single piece with the central hub, or is it a doughnut? If the latter, would it clear the helical gear, or not?
    Is it any good surface in the back for "grabbing" with a gear puller or similar device? I don't know how much experience you have and how good you are in dosing your force, but I'd be personally very careful pulling with a slide-hammer on the T-bolts. T-slots are relatively fragile.
    If the back is not conductive to positive grabbing/light-tapping with a lead mallet, maybe it's worth considering making a fixture to which you bolt to as many T-bolts as possible and use a gear puller or slide-hammer on the fixture, distributing the stress to as many points as possible.

    Just my two cents.

    Paolo

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    You have a picture of the oiling spots, the serial no. is on the bottom of it. I can't read it. I need a serial no. if you could.

    Thanks,
    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Eremius,
    Before giving you any suggestion, I would need to see more pictures, especially on the back of that part.
    I strongly believe that the T-bolts need to come out from the hole in the back at 12 o'clock (9 o'clock in the crooked picture). But how to get that hole open, that is what you have to remove and in which order is not 100% clear to me. For instance: is it a single piece with the central hub, or is it a doughnut? If the latter, would it clear the helical gear, or not?
    Is it any good surface in the back for "grabbing" with a gear puller or similar device? I don't know how much experience you have and how good you are in dosing your force, but I'd be personally very careful pulling with a slide-hammer on the T-bolts. T-slots are relatively fragile.
    If the back is not conductive to positive grabbing/light-tapping with a lead mallet, maybe it's worth considering making a fixture to which you bolt to as many T-bolts as possible and use a gear puller or slide-hammer on the fixture, distributing the stress to as many points as possible.

    Just my two cents.

    Paolo
    Well, I managed to get it out. It is not a donut, it is a solid piece with the shaft running through. Just as Richard described. On the back side of the shaft was a splined end that was held by a collar. Once I loosened the collar I was able to gently tap the shaft housing enough to separate the assembly from the rest of the overarm. I will get pictures of it posted soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by cmike View Post
    You have a picture of the oiling spots, the serial no. is on the bottom of it. I can't read it. I need a serial no. if you could.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    I will see if I can't dig up the serial number tonight. For clarification, do you expect the serial number to be on the place where the model is listed?
    Last edited by Eremius; 09-08-2016 at 08:22 AM. Reason: Adding to the post

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    do you expect the serial number to be on the place where the model is listed?
    Its stamped on the bottom of the tag in your photo above - possibly starting with 2U

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    Serial number:

    20160908_180823.jpg

    This is the collar that was holding the shaft in

    20160908_180613.jpg20160908_180615.jpg

    And this is the back of the shaft assembly

    20160908_180631.jpg

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    Machine was made in 1948 - the 1U before the hyphen tells the tale

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    Default C MIKe

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Its stamped on the bottom of the tag in your photo above - possibly starting with 2U
    Your right, its the model. I was in a hurry, wasn't thinking . Serial number is on the right face of the table.

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    Looking ahead to flood coolant, what will this machine be able to use? Soluble oil? Some flavor of synthetic coolant?

    Would I be better off just forgetting flood and using a mister?

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    More forward progress. The right angle of the overarm is mounted again. I removed the spindle head and found some fun. Lots of ick to go around.

    20160924_153120.jpg20160924_153044.jpg20160924_153050.jpg



    I need to get inside the spindle as it is leaking. Once I get this cleared up it should be all set.
    20160924_153131.jpg


    Hopefully it goes quickly. My phase converter arrives in a couple of days.

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    The powered over-rams are cool. I wish I had found one to fit the Cincinatti 2L when I was hunting for a replacement ram, but I honestly can't complain that I was able to get the basic one.

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    Pink buckets?? Work in healthcare? I have a few of those myself, fringe benefits of hospital maintenance. I have an old Cincinnati #2 that was built in I believe 1921, it still runs good and is in fair condition for being close to 100 years old. It looks like it was a horizontal mill and has been converted to a vertical. My question is with regards to the oil. I would like to change it in the gearbox. Does anyone have an idea of what type it may be? Or what to replace it with? Also way oil? I haven't bought any yet. I have an old Rockford Economy Lathe (1950's) also, would the same oils be ok for both (way and gearbox)? I apologize for the seemingly stupid questions. I have never owned a lathe or mill till this year and only really used the hospitals sparingly the last 8 years. Most of you have probably forgotten more than I know. Appreciate the help. Thanks

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    ^^^^^^^^
    I just read that and it looks like I'm asking if you can use the same oil in the gearbox and on the ways. I meant the same gearbox oil in both machines and the same way oil on both machines😁

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    I'm restoring one now. Here is my first vid on it: YouTube


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