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  1. #1
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    Default Help identifying mill

    Im having a tough time identifying this mill. It was in the middle of restoration when the owner died and has since been left to rust. So naturally, all of the labels are missing.

    I believe it's a kearney and trecker because of the milwaukee on the side, hence my post in this section. Sorry if it's not in the correct place.

    Any help us appreciated.




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    Yep, "Milwaukee" was the brand name of milling machines manufactured by the Kearney & Trecker Co.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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    Also page 64-65. Measuring table might tell you if model number was No 1 1/2B, or No 2 1/2B.

    388.jpg

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    Wow, that's awesome. I didn't think the machine was quite that old.

    Feels worth the $150 I paid for it. Even if it never gets restored.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greene4 View Post
    Wow, that's awesome. I didn't think the machine was quite that old.

    Feels worth the $150 I paid for it. Even if it never gets restored.
    Its too late for you now. Now that you have posted, you are obligated to continue posting with updates and pics.

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    I can handle that! Might give me some extra motivation.

    There are a couple of major issues though.
    All of the parts for the x axis are missing including the screw.
    The handwheel for the knee is broken off and missing.
    Also, the pump is likely bad, someone appears to have bypassed it.

    I guess it's nothing that can't be fixed though.

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    So here's a couple questions I have for anyone who can answer them. This will be my first milling machine, and my first anything this old. So bear with me...

    Where would be the best place to look for parts? I still can't find another one of these mills from searching besides an eBay listing. So I don't know the thread of the x axis leadscrew, or have any way to measure it. I could always convert it, but so far that looks awfully expensive for this project.

    This has a 3phase, 3hp motor on it. It's around the same price to go either with a VFD or a single phase motor. Which would you recommend?

    And last, I don't plan on this being something terribly accurate, would wire brushing the ways be a bad idea? I know that's introducing error, but will it be that noticable? Dependant on the level of rust and wear already in it, I assume?

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    You would be far better off hauling that thing to the scrapyard and recovering as much of your money as possible. Machines like that one complete and usable. Usually sell dirt cheap at auctions. Try to hit an auction or two. Parts are very hard to find you will more than likely have to make the parts you need. As a first mill go buy one that is complete and usable. You will be much happier than having that POS taking up space in your shop.

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    I can't disagree agree with scatter cat, as it may be worth more of your time to get something a whole lot closer to usable.

    But if just as a hobby project, it could be fulfilling to make it something useful. It will be a long project I expect though. It kind of depends on your mindset on what you'd like to do.

    Most here would recommend 3 phase over single phase, as a short answer.

    For parts I expect you will need to make or modify. Used for that age bracket will be few and far between.

    Its been rained on for a while, so hard to hurt it now. For the ways, I'd soak them with wd 40. And use 400 grit emery cloth or sandpaper. Soak both the sandpaper and ways in wd 40, and start going over it. Use rags to wipe it dry and start over.

    Its not what I'd want to do with freshly ground and scraped parts, but all the muscle you put into it by hand will not approach .0001". Just don't use power tools on ways.

    For the x axis screw. You want the tpi to equal the graduation marks of the handwheel dial, so that the math is right for one 360 degree revolution of handwheel/dial/screw .

    Assuming you don't have those, might try converting a screw, dial and handwheel from a bridgeport, or the like. with similar table length. Bridgeport parts are reasonable and available. Won't be bolt on ready. But a little modification could probably make it happen. Just an idea, might have a look at the parts to see how doable. Where and how to attach the feed nut for screw to move the table, getting that nut in middle of screw with table centered on machine for even travel, etc.

    As an example a Bridgeport x axis screw has 5 threads per inch, the dial has two hundred .001" increments for one rotation. The reading on dial starts at 0, and is .200" back to that 0.
    5 full rotations equal one inch.
    5 x .200" = 1".

    One question I'd have though, is what feed does that driveshaft on the side drive ? And how does it work ? Might need to lift the table and look at that.

    And before you start investing, go over the rest of machine. Are gears intact, or teeth blown off etc.
    Last edited by texasgunsmith; 10-22-2020 at 02:49 AM.

  13. #11
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    One question I'd have though, is what feed does that driveshaft on the side drive ? And how does it work ?
    Probably all of them via gearing in knee. Similar vintage High Power Cincinnatis did the table rapid via such a shaft

    I always jokingly remind folks there were no "axis" when such machines were born. It hasn't the least idea of what you are talking about.

    Never mind "looking" for parts (unless a duplicate machine falls in your lap as a donor) Hundred year olds get stuff MADE for them - or they do without

    Some time spent digesting the link pub in Post # 3 will be worthwhile as to KNOWING about it. Here is my slightly older pub

    http://pounceatron.dreamhosters.com/...a1917-port.pdf

    Have fun

    By the way spindle taper will be the much maligned B&S - the 10 or 11. It appears to have the 50 taper style flanged and face keyed spindle nose they patented in 1913 - (and which became part of the NMTB standard). In my pub, the verticals and their specs are near the rear of the pages

  14. #12
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    Maybe you're right, but I just can't bring myself to trash so much history. At least at the moment, until it becomes too much to tackle.
    That drive shaft is, as johnoder said and as far as I can tell, for all the axes, and there's a level to change which axis.

    I've only had the one afternoon with it. It's at the shop and I just get weekends when not working.

    I appreciate everyone's feedback, and I'll see what I can really make out of it. Maybe it would better serve as parts for someone else, the gearing and all inside is still nice looking, without and damage I could see.


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