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  1. #21
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    Only if he lifts it over the rear, a m543 will not lift much over the side they like to tip...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    Only if he lifts it over the rear, a m543 will not lift much over the side they like to tip...Phil
    It's a modern version, m936. Pretty much the same bed as the m543. My first wrecker was the m543, but it spent it's life next to the ocean before I got it- important parts started to fail so I parted it out.

    I've had 10k off the side with the outriggers out all the way, even rotated it.

  3. #23
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    I did a little digging in the #20 bulletin. Your machine definitely has feed stops that work in either direction- the base model design. Essentially, the little collars seen on the feed rod are positioned (via setscrews), such that when the carriage feeds against them, the feed rod dog clutch is disengaged. On the Pacemaker it will work in both directions. Its a bit fussy to set up since you have to compensate for the throw of the dog teeth before disengagement, but it repeats well.

    Handy for doing a lot of feeding up to a shoulder- or for long/close clearance boring jobs so you don't have to sweat it or spend time watching- the feed stops and will sit there disengaged until you come by and release it. When the carriage is traversed in the opposite direction, the dogs automatically re-engage. Note, this only affects the carriage feed; does not halt the spindle. Job permitting, setup is eased by getting it close by rotating the chuck by hand until the dogs just disengage, then tweaking the position of the tool via the compound slide.

    There are a pair of opposed springs inside the feed rod support bracket, down at the tailstock end. They hold the feed dogs engaged. On my High Duty- which is the model preceeding the Pacemaker, the stop only operates when feeding towards the headstock, so my machine only has 1 collar- yours has two. When not in use the collars are secured at either end of the rod, so they don't impede the carriage traverse.

    The fancy version has another pair of levers and multiple dogs permitting you to set a bunch of repeatable stops along the bed which operate the feed rod dogs in the same manner.

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  5. #24
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    My 1947 14x54 18 speed Pacemaker weighed 6200 on my crane scale. That's including the ball bearing TA, rapid traverse, chip pan, coolant pump, Sjogren collet chuck rack, geartrain for the RA attachment, lead screw reverse, and 2 speed 10hp motor with switch gear.

    Odd that this one doesn't seem to have the ball stop on the cross feed.

    Andy

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  7. #25
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    Well, she is in her temp spot, closing on the new place mid June, so she will get moved one last time hopefully then. Recovery went super smooth, got to pull inside and they loaded it right up. 6 hour drive home, and we rigged it into the container this afternoon, just as the rain started.

    Serial 741115-54. So I am guessing it is a 1954. Seems to be in great shape. I got a bunch of drill chucks, some live centers, and other bits. Was real happy to see the steady rest. The shear is bolted to the end of the bed. It does have the coolant pump.

    I had a roll of 8in wide, 1/4in thick rubber, so I cut sections to go between the straps and the lathe. I lifted it with two 12,800lb straps, and a ratchet strap to the tailstock end to balance. Worked great. Lifted it off the trailer, pulled the trailer forward, backed the truck to the container and eased it in by extending the boom.

    I'm super happy with it and am itching to get it setup.

    20200506_123437.jpg20200506_130606.jpg20200508_170722.jpg20200508_172739.jpg20200508_151634.jpg

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  9. #26
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    glad everything went well, your going to love that machine once you get it up and running. looks like you gor some good stuff to go with it. i see a tool post in there but no tool holders.

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  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by climb-101 View Post
    glad everything went well, your going to love that machine once you get it up and running. looks like you gor some good stuff to go with it. i see a tool post in there but no tool holders.
    Thanks! There is one tool holder with the post that was on the machine when I got it. I have been saving for over 10 years tool steel, a few holders, and drill chucks anticipating the day I got a lathe... I hope I can finally put them to use! I thought my holder was the next size up from what was on the machine, but I just went and looked and I think it is the size down. I don't have the one that came on the lathe handy at the moment to compare.

    Working out a phase converter now. Found a 15hp motor on craigslist for $200, might build my own. The lathe has a 7.5hp 220 3phase motor, so a 15hp converted should run it and the coolant pump easily. The 'final' resting spot for it I have planned, is 10ft from the 2, 240v 200amp breaker panels at the new place. Unfortunately, there isn't 3 phase running down the road, so that isn't an option. Plus a 3 phase connection can be EXPENSIVE. Especially for one piece of equipment. Until I add more! lol.

    Is it mid June yet?!?!

    cutting-tools.jpg

  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Menke View Post
    I did a little digging in the #20 bulletin. Your machine definitely has feed stops that work in either direction- the base model design. Essentially, the little collars seen on the feed rod are positioned (via setscrews), such that when the carriage feeds against them, the feed rod dog clutch is disengaged. On the Pacemaker it will work in both directions. Its a bit fussy to set up since you have to compensate for the throw of the dog teeth before disengagement, but it repeats well.

    Handy for doing a lot of feeding up to a shoulder- or for long/close clearance boring jobs so you don't have to sweat it or spend time watching- the feed stops and will sit there disengaged until you come by and release it. When the carriage is traversed in the opposite direction, the dogs automatically re-engage. Note, this only affects the carriage feed; does not halt the spindle. Job permitting, setup is eased by getting it close by rotating the chuck by hand until the dogs just disengage, then tweaking the position of the tool via the compound slide.

    There are a pair of opposed springs inside the feed rod support bracket, down at the tailstock end. They hold the feed dogs engaged. On my High Duty- which is the model preceeding the Pacemaker, the stop only operates when feeding towards the headstock, so my machine only has 1 collar- yours has two. When not in use the collars are secured at either end of the rod, so they don't impede the carriage traverse.

    The fancy version has another pair of levers and multiple dogs permitting you to set a bunch of repeatable stops along the bed which operate the feed rod dogs in the same manner.
    Theoretically, would using the dog clutch stops eventually round off the teeth on the clutch? If there was a significant feeding force and it was done a lot, then for the last few revolutions it would only be holding on by a whisker? I'm I thinking about this wrong, or is it not a real issue?

    Congrats on the lathe Ferro, seems like a great machine!

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  14. #29
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    I guess lots of possibilities exist, otoh the design was standard equipment on the High Duty and Pacemaker machines from early 1910's up to at least the end of the "art deco" style Pacemaker headstocks, perhaps later also. The dog clutch operates on the feed rod, in advance of the carriage feed gear train, so any coupling of the dog teeth sufficient to drive the feed rod will move the clutch further out of engagement. Perhaps given frequent use the teeth might start to round- but its all low rpm stuff.

    I've used the system on my 1936 High Duty maybe a half-dozen times, once or twice on my old 1912, both exhibited clean disengagement (no chattering) and easy re-engagement once feed was released and the carriage moved back.

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  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Menke View Post
    I guess lots of possibilities exist, otoh the design was standard equipment on the High Duty and Pacemaker machines from early 1910's up to at least the end of the "art deco" style Pacemaker headstocks, perhaps later also. The dog clutch operates on the feed rod, in advance of the carriage feed gear train, so any coupling of the dog teeth sufficient to drive the feed rod will move the clutch further out of engagement. Perhaps given frequent use the teeth might start to round- but its all low rpm stuff.

    I've used the system on my 1936 High Duty maybe a half-dozen times, once or twice on my old 1912, both exhibited clean disengagement (no chattering) and easy re-engagement once feed was released and the carriage moved back.
    I'd really like to thank Greg here, he offered up a tool post he got to me. We found out it was the same size as the one I have now. He also was a great wealth of knowledge and we texted almost all day back and forth about my lathe and its lubrication requirements excetera. So thanks for taking the time to converse with me Greg I appreciate it.

    Now on the subject of tool holders- I apparently have two BXA holders. I see that that's only good from 10 to 15 inch swing. Should I try to get a CXA holder? I see them on eBay they don't seem too horrible and maybe I can sell the BXAs that I have. What does everybody think? Trying to get as much in place and ready to go as I can so when I get it settled I can get to making chips lol.

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    i’m running a CA tool post on my 16x54 pacemaker and it seems about perfect. nice thing is that you can get holders for 1” tooling for the CA tool holder. I don’t know if you can on the CXA

  18. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by climb-101 View Post
    i’m running a CA tool post on my 16x54 pacemaker and it seems about perfect. nice thing is that you can get holders for 1” tooling for the CA tool holder. I don’t know if you can on the CXA
    Thanks, I will look at the CA holders.

  19. #33
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    Cxa is a lot more available. I asked about this on my 16x30 and the result I got was either will work.

    Sent from my LG-TP450 using Tapatalk

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  21. #34
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    my 0.02 on tool posts is buy the biggest you can justify the price on, my reasons are: 1 larger post allows the use of larger tools (and when it comes to boring bars that can be critical) 2 if you end up with larger machines later you can interchange the holders. 3 the post itself is more rigid (I can say this from experience)this is likely due more to the "footprint" of the post on the compound I rather doubt the post or the mounting allows any movement.(just a guess)

    that being said, I run a DA tool post on both of my 16x54 pacemakers and my dad runs a CA on his 14x54 pacemaker both work good enough, but when it comes to heavy material removal in 4140 or harder I get the job on my lathe just because it "feels" better.

    on the motor and three phase, we don't have three phase in our shop either, and with 20+ machines we use both static phase converters and rotary, but with the lathes we converted two of them to single phase reversible motors, this is much nicer than a rotary converter and leaves the rotary converter available for running other machines. And if you watch auctions for a few weeks you can usually get a motor pretty reasonably (definitely cheaper than a converter system)

    I'm glad to see another pacemaker get a good home,I have some spare parts for it that I bought from a former factory repair man if you need anything let me know I may have what you're looking for. by the way I have that same military truck, we use it nearly every week for heavy lifting.
    Happy Machining!

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  23. #35
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    All Industrial Tool Supply has oversize CXA 1" tool holders for about $26.Std CXA's hold 3/4" tools.

  24. #36
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    I was debating going with a single phase motor. But single phase reversible 7.5hp was hard to find, and when I did, $$$$.

    I have almost everything I need or access to at least to build a pretty good 5hp, 15hp combo RPC. I have the 5hp motor, so I will use that to spin up the 15hp. If I go with a RPC, I can get more equipment that is 3ph, and put it right to work without trying to find a motor to repower it. I've already been sniffing around for a mill, and I have a 3 phase pedestal tool grinder I forgot I even had! Now if I get some smaller 3 phase stuff, I will probably swap it over. But this way I can be using it right away, and find a motor for it at my leisure.

    Thanks for the advice on the tool posts. I will look around and see what I can do. I think I will sell the two BXA's I have and the holders that came with them, and use the funds to get a CA or CXA post and holder set.

    Thanks, if I find I need any parts I will definitely get in touch!

    They are handy trucks, that's for sure! I use it almost every other day around here to move something. Change tires on a trailer? just lift it with the wrecker! Don't know how I'd live without it now.

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  26. #37
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    5HP seems like a ridiculous motor to start up a 15hp. Starts caps really aren't that expensive either.

  27. #38
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    I use a 2hp single to start my 20hp converter.

    Sent from my LG-TP450 using Tapatalk

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    I guess I should have been a bit clearer. I have a 5hp 3ph, that I will start first, then spin up the 15hp with the 3 phase generated by the 5hp. Not the 5hp as a true mechanical pony motor. I've read a lot on combo RPCs and that's how they do it.

    That way I can run just the 5hp RPC if I'm only running the grinder or some other 2-3hp 3 phase stuff.

  29. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratbldr427 View Post
    All Industrial Tool Supply has oversize CXA 1" tool holders for about $26.Std CXA's hold 3/4" tools.
    I have an oversize BXA toolholder and find it clumsy to use for all but quite large tools; the tool is held lower than usual and so the height adjustment wheel tends to bottom out. Right now it has mounted a piece of 3/8" bar bent into an L such that the leg bears against the tailstock ram, so I can set tailstock max depth on drilling ops. Drop it in to set/adjust positions for the tailstock op, take it off fast for setting up the next one. OTOH I just swapped around tooling to get a bigger drill chuck on the tailstock- that leg might not work anymore.

    Smaller cutters easier to set up on the regular size BXA's, but if all you use are big ones then I could see it.

    Regards,

    Greg


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