Lodge and Shipley 16" questions
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  1. #1
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    Default Lodge and Shipley 16" questions

    Hello I was hoping to pick your collective brains for a moment:

    I bought this machine at auction a couple weeks ago. I think it's a 1953 model x by lodge and Shipley. I could use some more information on the machine.

    What kind of oil should I be using for the spindle and head gears? I found that I should be using vactra #2 for the ways. But didn't find anymore info

    I would also appreciate any information that anyone might have on sprucing her up. Any tips or tricks to get the lathe running tighter tolerances would be awesome. I realize I'm not going to get a 70 year old lathe to run tolerances of +/- .0001.
    But I'd like to get it running as tight/true as I can.

    I'm not new to machining but I'm definitely new to machines this old. I have run lathes and Mills that were made in the 80's or after but nothing from the 50's. Any info on running machines of the era , or info on reconditioning old machine tools would be greatly appreciated.
    For example: there is no dial or vernier scale on the z axis . Why is that? Is that a damage/modification the happened to the machine before I got it? Or did old-school machinists just use dial indicators/gages for everything ?

    Thanks for your help.
    Have a good one
    Link to pictures of the machine:
    Lodge and Shipley 16" - Album on Imgur

  2. #2
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    Whoa, dial for Z? I've never had a lathe with graduated movement along the ways. That's what created a market for the Trav-A-Dial company. For short movements, many of the old lathes may have had a mechanical stop with a graduated adjustment that could be mounted anywhere along the ways, but long travel was just a ruler and a tweak.

    Good looking machine there, by the way.

  3. #3
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    It would not know what a Z axis was if you asked it. No such thing when it was made in the fifties

    Its top end will be either 1160, 1740 or 2000 (and HP will be 10, 15 or 20)

    ISO 46 (such as DTE medium) for 1160, lighter as you go up on top end - depending on how much the upper ranges are used

    All oil is in sump low on rear - oil pump HAS to be working

    Probably need hearing protection in a small confined shop - they are noise makers

    Manuals compliments of VM

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2104/18295.pdf

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/2104/3561.pdf

    Serial will be right end on top IN BETWEEN TWO REAR VEE WAYS if you want it dated

    Looks like so inside
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dcp_1088.jpg   dcp_1089.jpg   dcp_1090.jpg   dcp_1091.jpg   dcp_1092.jpg  


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    Very unusual to find a Model X without a chip pan. Almost like a woman without clothes.
    Last edited by 4GSR; 09-06-2019 at 05:34 PM.

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    Thank you all so much for your help and information. I really appreciate it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    Whoa, dial for Z? I've never had a lathe with graduated movement along the ways. That's what created a market for the Trav-A-Dial company. For short movements, many of the old lathes may have had a mechanical stop with a graduated adjustment that could be mounted anywhere along the ways, but long travel was just a ruler and a tweak.

    Good looking machine there, by the way.
    Having a dial on the lathe long travel hand wheel is reasonably common over here, I've worked on a few both large and small. Normally they won't get you much nearer than 1/16" so they're not in the " Trav-A-Dial " league for accuracy but they're better than nothing.

    Regards Tyrone.

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