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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    The 10EE is easy with a sling, first web closest to the spindle, 100% INSIDE the ways and zero impinging on controls leadscrew, surfacing drive shaft. H-F's 6,000 lb or better.

    Don't use a H-F sling TWICE, though.
    H-F = Harbor Freight?
    Harbor Freight never entered my mind :-)
    I was thinking of something like these:

    Kennedy Wire Rope & Sling Co. 4" x 8' 2-Ply Twist Eye Polyester Lifting Sling (Various Sizes in Listing) Made in The USA Kennedy Wire Rope & Sling Co. 4" x 8' 2-Ply Twist Eye Polyester Lifting Sling (Various Sizes in Listing) Made in The USA: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific



    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    The Large & Shapely I'd do with chain, padded.

    But I stash it by the "tub", and have boxes of hardware for each size.

    Yeah, a chain would certainly work.
    I don’t own any heavy chain, so would need to rent/borrow/buy.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    3 skates on the 10ee if possible, a fourth will just roll away on uneven surface, which could have bad results. and I'd yank the end covers off before lifting or moving it around.

    The big lathe will be a more interesting move. I'd have to see it, the terrain, distance to move it etc.
    Thanks!
    I’ve never owned or moved a 10EE.
    I’d forgotten about taking off the castings.
    I guess I was thinking I’d put it up on a pallet jack.
    The garage floor is fairly smooth.
    That’s how I move “lighter” machines like Hardinges, mills, …
    Granted, the 10EE is twice the weight of a Hardinge…

    But I’m happy to use skates if I have them

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    Rigging can be done without much trouble. I put a spacer under the ways, to keep the straps out of the lead screw and the rapid transverse. I bought these 6k sheathed straps from a local industrial supply house. Used my 10k military wrecker to unload into a container while I waited for the closing on the new place, then used my railroad truck with a k boom to unload at the new place. Rolled it on pipes. Went real smooth. Lathe weighs 6200 according to the truck scale on my way home with it. 1954 16x54 American Pacemaker.

    112297.jpg20200508_170722.jpg20200508_172739.jpg

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    H-F = Harbor Freight?
    Harbor Freight never entered my mind :-)
    I prefer Northern Tool. Not all their stuff is Chinese!
    And what IS? they carry the stuff the Chinese USE themselves. IN China.



    H-F carries the stuff the Chinese will NOT buy!



    .. but H-F here is in walking distance, so "now and then".


    I was thinking of something like these:

    Kennedy Wire Rope & Sling Co. 4" x 8' 2-Ply Twist Eye Polyester Lifting Sling (Various Sizes in Listing) Made in The USA Kennedy Wire Rope & Sling Co. 4" x 8' 2-Ply Twist Eye Polyester Lifting Sling (Various Sizes in Listing) Made in The USA: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
    There are better sources than Amazon.. for ANYTHING..
    Always start with the experts. Not their pimps.
    Just one example:

    https://americancablerigging.com/wp-...lon_Slings.pdf


    Yeah, a chain would certainly work.
    I don’t own any heavy chain, so would need to rent/borrow/buy.
    Short lengths.. "Aircraft tie-down" grade are essential to have around.
    Longer, buy it by the tub, "virgin". Take care of it.

    Then you know what you have, to what specs, and who MADE it and sez-so.

    The usual "weakest link" applies, but often as not that is the attach HARDWARE.

    World is full of "looks like" chain and cable hardware, hooks, clevis, couplers, rings, lifting eyes, etc ... that are outright garbidge.

    THESE you need to make sure you get "the good stuff".

    It exists. Still US-Made. "Real" America still depends on that - not on the shite H-F and even Big Box traffic in.

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  7. #25
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    These people are my go-to for any rigging requirements:

    Wire Rope Locations

    Jack Rubin and Sons

    They don’t have any locations on your end of California, but they have Burbank, LA, Salt Lake City and Las Vegas locations, so chances are you can get something second day from any of them.

    They’ll have good slings in any length you can want, any flavor as well. Jack Rubin makes and certifies their own poly-slings, so as long as YOU size everything appropriately, if something does go wrong it’ll be on their liability and you’ll have recourse.




    Be safe



    Jeremy

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  9. #26
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    Nice! Beautiful lathe!

    The Lodge & Shipley AVS has a different bed casting style with rear facing chutes into the chip pan (I like the the Monarch pull out style chip pans better).

    So, you can’t do what you’re showing.




    Quote Originally Posted by Ferroequinologis View Post
    Rigging can be done without much trouble. I put a spacer under the ways, to keep the straps out of the lead screw and the rapid transverse. I bought these 6k sheathed straps from a local industrial supply house. Used my 10k military wrecker to unload into a container while I waited for the closing on the new place, then used my railroad truck with a k boom to unload at the new place. Rolled it on pipes. Went real smooth. Lathe weighs 6200 according to the truck scale on my way home with it. 1954 16x54 American Pacemaker.

    112297.jpg20200508_170722.jpg20200508_172739.jpg

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    .. AVS has a different bed casting style with rear facing chutes into the chip pan
    ...
    ...
    So, you can’t do what you’re showing.
    Yes, you can.

    Same as an HBX-360.

    Down closest chute to the HS, out the back, wrap right over top a section of tire or cord-in recyled doormat, come back in, and UP the next-nearest chute.

    Both ends come up ''tween the ways, no way to get near ANY rods or controls.

    Will it hang level?

    No.

    But short-axis, it need not be level. It only has to be secure and STABLE.

    As it cannot shift...

    Other tackle adjusts long-axis balance in a stable manner as well.

    "PS:"

    DO NOT .. rely on clamps to keep carriage OR TS where you want them.

    Block AND strap around the bed, ahead & behind, too.

    Slide hammers b'long toolboxen. Not lathe-bed "runways".

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  12. #28
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    look up crane rigging supplies california and something should come up it might be an 50 mile drive but a rigging shop will have stuff that is rated and tested. as for chain I would much rather use an endless round slings and it would probably be way cheaper and a lot lighter if you have to purchase. Im paranoid but I got hit in the back of the head by a breaking chain on a lift I was doing let me tell you that really hurts it was just grade 40 though so total my fault i was young and dumb I overloaded it and paid for it. Nylon & Polyester Slings from Westech Rigging Supply
    here is some ides on stuff available online

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    Nice! Beautiful lathe!

    The Lodge & Shipley AVS has a different bed casting style with rear facing chutes into the chip pan (I like the the Monarch pull out style chip pans better).

    So, you can’t do what you’re showing.







    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I used two straps, and went under each way. I am guessing you mean instead of chips going straight down the chute drops them out under the back way? That would make things difficult to do it my way yeah.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jermfab View Post
    These people are my go-to for any rigging requirements:

    Wire Rope Locations

    Jack Rubin and Sons

    They don’t have any locations on your end of California, but they have Burbank, LA, Salt Lake City and Las Vegas locations, so chances are you can get something second day from any of them.

    They’ll have good slings in any length you can want, any flavor as well. Jack Rubin makes and certifies their own poly-slings, so as long as YOU size everything appropriately, if something does go wrong it’ll be on their liability and you’ll have recourse.




    Be safe



    Jeremy
    Same over here! Their Utah branch is Rocky Mountain Wire Rope and the service is excellent. Salesman always delivers my orders personally and quickly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferroequinologis View Post
    I used two straps, and went under each way. I am guessing you mean instead of chips going straight down the chute drops them out under the back way? That would make things difficult to do it my way yeah.
    The center of the force vector for the straps using exit chutes would only be offset to the inside edge of the rear way .. instead of centered on the bed, your attach scheme.

    That said, AFAIK, an AVS is heavier AWAY from the operator side anyway.

    Most L&S are away-biased at the HS. Motor & drivetrain bias vs apron bias.

    So it might still lean rearward, not forward, and wasn't going to be perfectly balanced around the centerline of the bed to begin with.

    Not a show-stopper, either way.

    Attach points that can MOVE, OTOH, are MOST unwelcome!

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  18. #32
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    Default Lodge & Shipley AVS 2013

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    The center of the force vector for the straps using exit chutes would only be offset to the inside edge of the rear way .. instead of centered on the bed, your attach scheme.

    That said, AFAIK, an AVS is heavier AWAY from the operator side anyway.

    Most L&S are away-biased at the HS. Motor & drivetrain bias vs apron bias.

    So it might still lean rearward, not forward, and wasn't going to be perfectly balanced around the centerline of the bed to begin with.

    Not a show-stopper, either way.
    Not a show-stopper, but I’m definitely going to be paying close attention and going real slow when lifting the AVS off the deck.

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Attach points that can MOVE, OTOH, are MOST unwelcome!
    Yeah.
    I think slinging a bar in the spindle is primarily for balance.
    The majority of the weight will be carried by the slings around the bed.

  19. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Yes, you can.

    Same as an HBX-360.

    Down closest chute to the HS, out the back, wrap right over top a section of tire or cord-in recyled doormat, come back in, and UP the next-nearest chute.

    Both ends come up ''tween the ways, no way to get near ANY rods or controls.
    I wasn’t clear. My point was that there isn’t a front/apron side opening to pass a sling through.
    I was planning on doing what you’re describing.


    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Will it hang level?

    No.

    But short-axis, it need not be level. It only has to be secure and STABLE.

    As it cannot shift...

    Other tackle adjusts long-axis balance in a stable manner as well.

    "PS:"

    DO NOT .. rely on clamps to keep carriage OR TS where you want them.

    Block AND strap around the bed, ahead & behind, too.

    Slide hammers b'long toolboxen. Not lathe-bed "runways".
    Agreed! I have ample straps for that and more.
    Tempting as it may be, I wasn’t planning on pulling the tailstock off either. Thing is frickin heavy!

  20. #34
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    Default Lodge & Shipley AVS 2013

    The badly cracked driveway will not be liking me driving a 15K rated forklift carrying a 7500 pound lathe across it…



    I’m thinking I might sacrifice a sheet of 3/4” CDX to roll the forklift over.
    That should triple the lathe transportation and rigging costs… :-) (Actually, lumber prices have come down recently!!)

    The place where the L&S will go:


    The concrete IN the garage is pretty smooth and only a few cracks in some areas. Fingers crossed it stays that way!

    I wish I had more space! Then I wouldn’t have the lathe snugged up to the wall!

    While the Lodge & Shipley rear chip chute and pan is a fine design and is great if you have space, it is meant to have space on all sides. I do like the Monarch slide/roll out chip pan design.
    Last edited by rpseguin; 08-04-2021 at 01:17 PM.

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  22. #35
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    Default Lodge & Shipley AVS 2013

    Will rollers tolerate these cracks and unevenness in the driveway?
    I have my doubts.

    I think rollers would dig in on plywood when carrying a 7500 pound lathe.

    A friend said I could borrow their toe jack.
    I want the lathe to go in headstock first.

    The forklift I’m renting will have 8 foot forks, but I wouldn’t dare put much load that far out. After getting the lathe off the truck and onto the driveway, I was thinking of the forklift as providing the pushing power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    The badly cracked driveway will not be liking me driving a 15K rated forklift carrying a 7500 pound lathe across it…



    I’m thinking I might sacrifice a sheet of 3/4” CDX to roll the forklift over.
    That should triple the lathe transportation and rigging costs… :-) (Actually, lumber prices have come down recently!!)
    LOL! An already failed subgrade? Forget plywood!

    Take the USACE course on airport construction if you have spare time!
    "Equivalent single wheel loading" is your killer with the FL.

    With that pavement?

    I wouldn't even use a FL at all for this task.

    I'd EITHER:

    - bring in a heavy wrecker CRANE for getting the load(s) "directly" off the truck, locally.

    ELSE.. have the load transferred at their yard to a rollback, one at a time, if not both, two delivery runs if need be. "Roadrunner" here has me in file, and even grant a discount. Vet, Senior Citizen.. wotever...

    - then do the rest on my skates.... over a 2-by .... 6", 8", 10", or 12" paved "roadway". Usually two layers and my own fav trick = "polywood" trim board atop. It embeds any casting irregularities so the whole lot slides very nicely!

    Easier, and safer. Cheaper by enough to end-up OWNING my own skates, pry-dollies, toe-jacks, and such.

    The wood goes into projects, or - NEVER "pressure treat" - can go into the woodstove!

    Ply and such are not good at surviving the stresses, become useless..

    Planks "can be" still useful, no real damage - IF properly applied.
    As-in flat and with good support.

    Do not allow them to "bridge" any feature of any significant span atall.

    If you MUST use a FL [1], RENT steel plates, place them with chain using the FL.

    A source will be "around". Search on "trench plate rental".

    Road builders & utility repair krews rent plates as often as own them.

    [1] Whole family of these articulated move-every-which-way rough-terrain buggers on my GI "Heavy" license. They can even be FUN!

    10K Rough Terrain Military Forklift Pettibone - YouTube

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  25. #37
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    The lathes were picked up from Monarch Lathes today and are en route.
    ETA is Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday morning.

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    LOL! An already failed subgrade? Forget plywood!
    Yeah. The driveway is pretty bad.
    I wish I could get it redone before rolling heavy stuff across it.
    Open to suggestions on how to handle things.
    It’s harvest season in Napa, so forklifts are hard to come by and the prices are jacked way up.
    I talked with All Machinery Moving and John said he might be able to do it, but if I go that route, I want to avoid idle time at $225/hour… it’s 2 hours drive each way for them, so that’s $900 not even including any actual rigging.



    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Take the USACE course on airport construction if you have spare time!
    "Equivalent single wheel loading" is your killer with the FL.

    With that pavement?

    I wouldn't even use a FL at all for this task.

    I'd EITHER:

    - bring in a heavy wrecker CRANE for getting the load(s) "directly" off the truck, locally.

    ELSE.. have the load transferred at their yard to a rollback, one at a time, if not both, two delivery runs if need be. "Roadrunner" here has me in file, and even grant a discount. Vet, Senior Citizen.. wotever...

    - then do the rest on my skates.... over a 2-by .... 6", 8", 10", or 12" paved "roadway". Usually two layers and my own fav trick = "polywood" trim board atop. It embeds any casting irregularities so the whole lot slides very nicely!

    Easier, and safer. Cheaper by enough to end-up OWNING my own skates, pry-dollies, toe-jacks, and such.

    The wood goes into projects, or - NEVER "pressure treat" - can go into the woodstove!

    Ply and such are not good at surviving the stresses, become useless..

    Planks "can be" still useful, no real damage - IF properly applied.
    As-in flat and with good support.

    Do not allow them to "bridge" any feature of any significant span atall.

    If you MUST use a FL [1], RENT steel plates, place them with chain using the FL.

    A source will be "around". Search on "trench plate rental".

    Road builders & utility repair krews rent plates as often as own them.

    [1] Whole family of these articulated move-every-which-way rough-terrain buggers on my GI "Heavy" license. They can even be FUN!

    10K Rough Terrain Military Forklift Pettibone - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    I wish I could get it redone before rolling heavy stuff across it.
    Open to suggestions on how to handle things.
    My location, with the L&S, PLUS a 10EE. I would call-out a hook.

    My "usual" is more like 2 miles if-even, not 2 hours, though:

    Heavy Duty Towing - Road Runner

    Have a look at the rig deployed in the shot by "construction towing" text. Similar one is in PM where Abom79 moved his lathes and HBM out of his old shop.

    Once it is off the delivery vehicle and on the Earth, money clock essentially stops.

    Then it's just a one-man move into the space at whatever speed I'm up for.
    Then again, I OWN all the rigging gear I need. Plus-plus.
    Tarps, too, so no time pressure!

    Forklifts I usually use have a drop & recovery fee, would run me about $500 or more all-up, anyway. More-yet if I kept it a second day to move the goods about.

    That said, the L&S isn't one I'd WANT to fork with the available FL trucks that I can get fast or on a tight schedule, even here.

    Annnd it would have to be snatched on the public street where I live, then trundled down to the corner onto intersecting narrower street to get to the lower driveway that serves the shop.

    Hook could just lift, swing, lower.
    Where I am, anyway.

    I surely no longer have a Long Binh, RVN Engineer Brigade-level motor pool with playtoys as would make your toes curl at my beck and call!

    First photo. 20 Ton RT crane. Anything bigger, I ran out of license.

    Rough Terrain Crane, 20 ton, American Hoist Model 2380

    Modern "turret" boom recovery vehicles of the sort Roadrunner and others utilize have about the same lift - sometimes more - just not the off-road tires feature.

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    It is enough if you allow 18" between the chip pan and the rear wall. It is not much, but it works. The moving of the lathe into its final location should be done with machine skates. I would be more concerned with your floor under the lathe. First, I don't believe your 7500 lb. estimate. I think it's more like 10k or more. My installation manual for my L&S states 8" of steel reinforced concrete as a base. If you don't have that, I would use a 3/4" steel plate under the entire lathe to spread the load.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    It is enough if you allow 18" between the chip pan and the rear wall. It is not much, but it works. The moving of the lathe into its final location should be done with machine skates. I would be more concerned with your floor under the lathe.
    Yeah, I wish I had good floors.

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    First, I don't believe your 7500 lb. estimate. I think it's more like 10k or more. My installation manual for my L&S states 8" of steel reinforced concrete as a base. If you don't have that, I would use a 3/4" steel plate under the entire lathe to spread the load.
    According to this:
    Lodge & Shipley Machine Tool Co. - Publication Reprints - AVS-Answer Lathe Brochure | VintageMachinery.org

    The weight is 7150 dry weight.
    I figure a couple hundred extra in tooling and misc.


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