Morris small radial drill Hanford surplus. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Better than watching TV and cheaper than drinking and gambling.

  2. #22
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    I have been talking to two people on this drill, the one that makes final decisions was injured, today from the hospital, he agreed!
    But, there is a lot more stuff moved in there, and the nature of their business big rig towing and recovery, they cant get it out of there for a month.
    They are going to allow me to begin de-rusting the drill where it sits, I have a tarp over it and a can of Blaster sprayed on it....

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  4. #23
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    Congrats. I was hoping that radial drill would be saved.

  5. #24
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    The milling machine he had hauled outside the gate, this drill is tucked away, he didn't plan to sell it, might need it sometime thing.
    I pointed this out to the kid.
    In this photo, the oil and caked on dirt on the bottom of the head is from water getting into the head and displacing the oil "water ends up at the bottom of the oil reservoir the oil rises and flows out".

    Same thing happened with the mill, can be seen in the photos in the B&S No2 thread, no damage there, it was caught in time. I think its ok here also, I am able to shift the head gears and move the quill.
    The young fellow at the yard is really entertained that an old guy like me can pull a machine from scrap and make it work again. He can see the drill needs attention now or it will be lost, the older guy thats in the hospital sold it to me because I will at least try to fix it.
    Right now in this region, there seems to be a large amount of machine tools of all kinds for sale, the heavier then Bridgeport mills are going really cheap, the local scrap yards are not buying, large family farming operations being sold to corporations, they have everything hauled off. Machines a not so good investment, but all the cool things you can make, and fix!
    The two machines I picked up here are unique, in that they were in good working condition before being moved into the weather. Most other machines that are for sale around here, are really worn out.
    I am into the Mill 30 hours now, and thinking another 20 or so it should be running! The drill should be a little easier, I might have to remove the table to move it around with a pallet jack though.

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  7. #25
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    Beware the balance and weight of that thing on a pallet jack. A radial drill is the most deceiving object in terms of apparent weight, next to a shaper. That drill, even in 3ft form, can easily top 6,000lbs and as you probably know, is insanely easy to flop over. find or build a big pallet that you can bolt or strap it down to (from the top of the column, if strapping). Great looking machine, though! As Thermite says, you can probably derust the vast majority of the ways by loosening everything and sliding the head and arm into a derusted area. That's how I cleaned up my Fosdick. What's under the head and column clamp is going to be clean, so just clean and move it.

    "To wit, using a motor & drivetrain as partial counterweight rather than hanging one up-top, where it is hard to service, parking another on a sort of a "back porch" at floor level, where more complex power transmission goods are involved."

    Yup, makes them MUCH less tippy. The "back porch" versions were used to minimize design changes on the old lineshaft belt driven models, the motor replacing the big cone pulley that sat at the base of the column. My Fosdick has the factory conversion to a motor where the motor sits behind the column and runs through a gearbox that outputs back the opposite direction to the tumbler type gearbox sitting at the base of the column. When I removed the gearbox, the depression for the big cone pulley is in the base casting.

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  9. #26
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    Thanks for the advice, I have no experience moving one of these, and I dont want to dump it over! I can see how the design with the drive motor extended out the rear of the column could cause it to be more unstabil with the table removed. I have to remove the table to get the weight down to 5000lbs, I think it would be good to remove the motor also, that should help keep the weigh more balanced over its base for the move.
    The arm is 1" from being all the way down. The milling machine was the same, that short distance allowed the knee on the mill to break free from its own weight, hopefully that will work on the drill.

    It seems the Morris Co was sold many times into non existence in the 1950s, but was an early well known maker of radial drills, there are still many out there and for sale.

  10. #27
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    Main danger, of course, is flipping side to side. Make SURE the column is locked so it can't rotate and same for the sliding head. I wouldn't bother with the motor, it's not going to make much difference in the big scheme of things. Would be good to leave the table if at all possible. Best is to put a T nut and a bolt with the head cut off in the table slot, put a chuck in the spindle and grab the bolt in the chuck to keep the arm from swinging, no matter what. You may have to clean the head slide to do that. Straps to a nice wide pallet from the top of the column will keep it from tipping. If it never moves, the straps will only be loaded with the tension of holding. the further from vertical it gets, the more the load would increase, but just typical cheap tie straps should hold it fine in that way. Of course, heavy straps or better yet, chains for transport. When on the pallet jack, only get it high enough to move, never more than 1/4" or so off the floor.

  11. #28
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    The one thing broken off on the machine is the column lock lever of course.
    The plan B is using heavier equipment to move it, looking at the off balance, and other possible problems, it will be worth the extra cost.
    I think I can chain the arm to the table, and also chain, or strap the head, to prevent those from moving. Just leave it as it is, but all tied up.
    I have limited experience with these drills, there was on this size at the school, I think I used it twice 40yrs ago.
    If I have this drill on the edge of my drive way, it could tip over and crash into the house next door...….

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  13. #29
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    That's why the motor is on the back end of the arm. Helps balance things out. The old style would tip if the head was ran way out and the arm was moved much past the edge of the base. The G&L Bickford at work solves this problem completely by having a T shaped base. It has three work stations on the base with T slots. I keep the box table on the center one, leave the right side open for drilling out broken bolts in big motor housings and such, and store junk on the left side one. Takes up more floor space, but you simply can't tip it over without trying.

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    The one thing broken off on the machine is the column lock lever of course.
    Good news, actually. They are not good enough for road stress.

    Drop a rubber truck or farm tractor tire carcass over the exposed nose of the ram. Shitty tire is OK, long as the bead is good.

    Chain both directions from the strong bead of it and yer better-off.

    Same with the column. Salvaged tire dropped over the top, chains again, using the bead of the tire as a "horse collar" to attach to.

    Heavier gear recommended.

    I'd call-out a decent hook, both ends of the trip, get chain under, cinch it well up so it cannot move, lift from above.

    Plan & prepare a "roadway". Place it there on skates to roll it into the shop.

    Rent a pair of toe-jacks. Or buy 'em. Mine are a joy vs other options. Gittin' old.

    Use skids & outriggers, not conventional pallet nor even heavy-duty pallet.

    Then skates. Even these "baby" radials are over what a heavier-lift pallet jack can manage.

    Cryin' shame to use less, save a few bucks, only to succeed in ending the day with an all-fall-down pile of damaged scrap Iron in your driveway instead of the salvage yard.

  15. #31
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    I can borrow a set of skates to move it inside. Once They set it down, I will leave it and work on it, until its ready to go inside, its just going to be in the middle of the road for awhile as I need to get all around it to clean it up.
    The drill is listed at 5200lbs without table.

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