New to me...Toolmaster
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  1. #1
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    Default New to me...Toolmaster

    So I wanted a milling machine, and I thought I wanted a Bridgeport. A Cincinnati Toolmaster showed up on C'list ind I could see from the pics it was a vertical style mill so I decided to broaden my horizons and take a look. Initially I passed because I swallowed the cool-ade and thought it's B'port or nothing. Then I did a little research, messaged the seller back quickly and pulled the trigger. It's paid for and a check has been cut for the rigging co.
    Turns out it's a Cincinnati Toolmaster H-V and I'm going f*!*!*!g crazy waiting for delivery. In order to help "cool my jets" I decided to see if the folks on here could tell my anything about it. Sorry about the crappy pictures, it is currently in the corner of a dark garage. If you could tell me what specific head it has I could narrow my research a bit. There is really quite a bit of pubic domain info but it would narrow my searching. Also is this NMTB 40 toolholder I hope I hope.
    Any things I should particularly pay attention to?
    Better pics to follow I promise!
    Thanks!
    (damn I still don't seem to have the hang of adding pics)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0831.jpg   img_0832.jpg   img_0841.jpg   img_0835.jpg   img_0847.jpg  

    Last edited by Machdaddy; 09-23-2018 at 08:32 AM. Reason: pictures

  2. #2
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    you have a 1-d and a 1-c , on the same column. a wet dream...........i'm jealous

    yes, both use standard 40 taper holders . no special tooling needed.

    there's a zerk under the vertical motor that gets a shot of grease. don't over
    do it or you'll get grease on the belt. on top of the feedbox is a hex plug
    (over the knurled round thing) fill that with oil . that's what lubes the
    feedbox and quill and such. doesn't really matter , but i use way lube because it's already in my pump can . there's bijur oilers on the table and knee as well.they get way oil.

    don't know shit about a 1-c.

    mine's a 1-d , and -no- i don't wish it were a bridgeport . it will hog steel
    with a 1" endmill. a bridgeport would do a patsy kline . i have the manuals,
    but they are freely available online . someone else will chime in.

    great find.

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  4. #3
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    Thanks, my friend.
    1c you say. Does it also swivel to vertical?

  5. #4
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    the overarm thing on the end of the ram is a universal head . it will rotate to
    wherever you put it.

  6. #5
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    Finally here! It's bigger and dirtier than I remembered, luckily I thrive on cleaning up old machinery! Speaking of old can anyone tell me what year this is from! Ser.# an the main body is 5531HVD5VI. On the cover plate for the electronics (which seem to be in excellent cond.) is # 5531HVD54-0001.
    So anything in particular you would like to see a picture of?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1054.jpg   img_1057.jpg   img_1058.jpg   img_1059.jpg   udhb4245.jpg  


  7. #6
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    Very nice. Looks like late production, made in 1969.

    Maybe some photos inside the electrical cabinet?

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnmgcarbide View Post
    you have a 1-d and a 1-c , on the same column. a wet dream...........i'm jealous
    I'm just laffin'!!!

    Not the first guy who looked at a photo of a Toolmaster with no other reference and thought "Oh well, just another BirdPort clone."

    Then you see 'em side-by side or up close and personal and say: "Bird WHAT?"

    'coz if the Cinncy is the "master" its the poor BirdPort as was meant to be the "tool". Cincinnati had a MEAN sense of humour!


  9. #8
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    Take good care of it- I wanted to go get it but was just too darn busy. I have a soft spot for Toolmaster mills. The box ways and 40 taper spindle are sweet. I have a Toolmaster vertical only that I took out of a school years ago and it is so smooth and tight that people think that it has ball screws. The one sweet addition would be o add a power drawbar. Good luck with it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by MARK07747 View Post
    Take good care of it- I wanted to go get it but was just too darn busy. I have a soft spot for Toolmaster mills. The box ways and 40 taper spindle are sweet. I have a Toolmaster vertical only that I took out of a school years ago and it is so smooth and tight that people think that it has ball screws. The one sweet addition would be o add a power drawbar. Good luck with it....
    PDQ-Marlin "S", 40 taper ass-end, drawbar can just SIT!

    Several more side-locks came in yesterday...


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    Very nice! Good for you and what a great machine! Similar path for me. Went looking for a lathe for the garage, figured a south bend... Came back with a Tray Top. It was in superb condition and is a fantastic machine. Went looking recently for a mill, figured BPT (running out of room in my small residential garage) bought a Lagun instead. The difference is truly night and day between these two machine classes and any comparison would be a waste of time.

    A couple of Toolmasters crossed my radar. I would have loved one especially based on my Cinci brand succes. Unfortunately they were either too 'rough', too much money, or too far away. The only 'thing' with Cinci is parts. Your beaut looks great though. Good luck with it and enjoy!!!

  12. #11
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    Welcome to the 1D club. Let me know if you need manuals.

    Of course, with both ends of the box occupied, you have no room for a shaper attachment...

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    I have the same mill. Great piece of equipment and very versatile. I use the horizontal side more than the vertical, but that is because I have two other vertical mills.

    When it comes to moving metal, the Cinci is the go to machine. Power to all three axis with rapids is great.

    The electrical side is extremely simple. It does have three motors.

    Great find and looks to be in great condition.

  14. #13
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    Thanks for the encouragement!Is there an economical way to generate 3 phase power sufficient to run it? I was given a new electronic phase converter (made in China)and it's hit or miss at best, currently throwing an error code hence not operating. Does a static phase converter need to be rated for the total H.P.of all 3 motors? That may be my problem, but it was working fine on Sunday. I paid a little more than I hoped to get her this far (purchase and rigging)so I would like to provide elec on the cheap, what's been your experience...
    Some pics inside the electrical box as requested.

    img_1068.jpgimg_1069.jpgimg_1070.jpgimg_1071.jpgimg_1072.jpg

    As per usual pic are rotated CCw 90 degrees.

  15. #14
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    I guess that, for "new electronic phase converter (made in China)" you mean a variable frequency driver (VFD). The bad news is that, independently from where they're made, as far as I know, not a single VFD tolerates anything between its output and the motor: straight connections, no magnetic contactors, switches, etc.
    The best solution for you is to build a rotary phase converter: you need a 3 phase motor at least as powerful as the most powerful of the motors of your mill and a bunch of capacitors, contactors, etc. You have the choice of either build the box by yourself or buy it as kit or assembled from a couple of companies. It will cost you less than three VFDs (one for each motor).

    Paolo

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    American Rotary RPCs are sweet. I think it's economical but that's subjective. Love mine, run it all day long.

  17. #16
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    Thanks for that! I'll start doing my research.

  18. #17
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    Thanks for posting the elec cabinet photos. Looks very clean, not covered in an oily film like mine was.

    Another vote here for the American Rotary APC. I've got one to power my Toolmaster and Hydrashift lathe, and it's been a good set up. Like most things of this nature, buy one bigger than you think you'll need. My RPC will run both machines all day with no problems, but when I bought it, I only had the lathe. I'm glad I went up a size from what I needed to run just the lathe.

  19. #18
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    Build your own if you're short on cash. At its most elemental, a RPC is a used 3phase motor started by pulling a rope wrapped around a shaft.

    A used 3 phase, 2-3 hp motor can be had for well under $50. Connecticut is lousy wit' 'em! And if you want to drive to Vermont, I'll give you one.


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