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  1. #61
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    Oh yeah, forgot to mention, after putting the table back together I checked backlash. .013" on the table and .006" on the saddle feed, measured right in the middle of the travel. Pretty damn good!

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dope View Post
    Many, many MANY thanks for this! I did a slightly modified version of your plan and gutted them all. It went pretty easily, thank you for the explanation.

    https://youtu.be/FORWPDfPZJo
    My two low points were on each side of the knee, by about 6 to 8 inches lower. After pumping up system, during the next day or two, the higher points of the tree gradually back fed to the lower. So excess oil was running down column ways and onto base during the next two days.

    My solution was to add a small shut off valve on each side of the knee. I open it during lube priming, then shut it off after. Works perfectly:

    135.jpg 136.jpg

    The valves I got from Home Depot in the plumbing section. These are typically for the small water line for a frig ice maker. One end was 1/8 pipe thread, the other had nut/cap with compression fitting. I threw the cap and compression fitting away, and used a 1/8 pipe die to chase the thread. Then added a union to connect original fitting.

    There's various options depending what you need or want to do though.

    I don't regret gutting those fittings at all. In my opinion they are the single greatest source of machine damage, with each individual fitting a potential failure point.

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  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    My two low points were on each side of the knee, by about 6 to 8 inches lower. After pumping up system, during the next day or two, the higher points of the tree gradually back fed to the lower. So excess oil was running down column ways and onto base during the next two days.

    My solution was to add a small shut off valve on each side of the knee. I open it during lube priming, then shut it off after. Works perfectly:

    135.jpg 136.jpg

    The valves I got from Home Depot in the plumbing section. These are typically for the small water line for a frig ice maker. One end was 1/8 pipe thread, the other had nut/cap with compression fitting. I threw the cap and compression fitting away, and used a 1/8 pipe die to chase the thread. Then added a union to connect original fitting.

    There's various options depending what you need or want to do though.

    I don't regret gutting those fittings at all. In my opinion they are the single greatest source of machine damage, with each individual fitting a potential failure point.
    Yeah I'm gonna see how it goes, it seems all my lines are on almost the same level, and the pump is just below them too. I haven't noticed excess oil leaking but we'll see.

    I can see what you mean by being such a danger, especially after realizing how many totally hidden lines there are under the table, and how many of the fittings were 100% completely non-working. I was hitting them with 150psi of air and not even getting a whistle of air leaking past the fittings, just completely bound up.


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