Pratt whitney model c lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default Pratt whitney model c lathe

    So, I was chasing a suspect through the desert and saw a old lathe sitting in a fenced yard in the middle of nowhere. I asked around and found the owner. He said 25 bucks and it's yours. Long story short, I am now proud owner of a pratt and whitney model c lathe 16x54. I do own a conehead pratt whitney along with what I believe is cals van norman 1/2(and many more). Serial number shows m1696-21093, any idea what year that is? I was thinking 1953? Thanks in advance.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20191106_102957.jpg   20191109_124605.jpg   20191107_115425.jpg   20191105_120659.jpg   20191105_120657.jpg  


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  3. #2
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    Manuals can be emailed if you want to private message me that address. Actually 1952, towards the end of that year

    Odd what people will do to JEWEL like machinery

    Built here - photos replaced at end of thread

    USA Heavy Iron Disappearance

    ph

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    It is very sad to see someone just leave this lathe in the weather. The rust seems to be more of a patina on the ways. I'm hoping it cleans up ok. I check the oil reservoirs and water is in the apron and the quick change gearbox.but the head is water free.
    The reverse lever is stuck and I cant move the saddle. I'm thinking its related. The spindle turns free and smooth even when its turning the motor.

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    Ok, this is the best story of finding old iron I've ever herd.. "chasing a suspect through the desert and saw..." !!

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    The reverse lever is stuck and I cant move the saddle
    Might be the half nut lever is engaged - its the one on the right sticking straight up with the black knob

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Might be the half nut lever is engaged - its the one on the right sticking straight up with the black knob
    The half nut lever moves and yes I disengaged it before trying to move it. I'll take some photographs of the water damage in the reservoirs and hopefully remove the apron cover. Thanks for the suggestion.

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    We have a similar lathe, I think a “b” size. Fantastic little machine, I love it. Ours came from a pole barn type of storage, so no direct rain but humidity definitely gave it a solid layer of rust similar to yours. It all cleaned up perfectly. Also I don’t think the ways are hardened so be wary of any aggressive abrasives for rust removal. Good luck cleaning it up!

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    Thanks for the suggestion I'm hoping the ways clean up nice, I have a 1953 brochure that states it is hardened but regardless I'm going to avoid abrasive rust removal techniques. Any experiance with evapo rust? It's not acid so hoping it will do well. Here is a picture of the v up close.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20191107_120701.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thewoodshoppe View Post
    Thanks for the suggestion I'm hoping the ways clean up nice, I have a 1953 brochure that states it is hardened but regardless I'm going to avoid abrasive rust removal techniques. Any experiance with evapo rust? It's not acid so hoping it will do well. Here is a picture of the v up close.

    They are hard (and ground) but not steel - so maybe the "push it off scheme" still works. Anything from a single edge razor blade to a semi dull way scraper. Thumbnails on such cast iron ways that sat out for years
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dcp_1289.jpg   dcp_1317.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    They are hard (and ground) but not steel - so maybe the "push it off scheme" still works. Anything from a single edge razor blade to a semi dull way scraper. Thumbnails on such cast iron ways that sat out for years
    Thanks! I do have a dull scraper. I'll try that technique later today probably. Those ways cleaned up nice.

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    I've had success with derusting large pieces with evapo rust by covering the areawith paper towels, soaking with the evapo rust then covering with plastic sheet. Occasionally lifting the sheet to rewet the towels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    I've had success with derusting large pieces with evapo rust by covering the areawith paper towels, soaking with the evapo rust then covering with plastic sheet. Occasionally lifting the sheet to rewet the towels.
    Thank you I'll try that.

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    Here is the water damage in the feed mechanism. Also do I need all this electrical components if I run a vfd ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20191111_084432.jpg   20191111_093819.jpg   20191111_093826.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thewoodshoppe View Post
    Here is the water damage in the feed mechanism. Also do I need all this electrical components if I run a vfd ?
    Unless you replace the motor with a modern "inverter duty" one, I would not even consider a VFD. The lathe doesn't NEED it to provide useful RPM.

    An RPC will do yah with less overall work.

    Anything electrical AT ALL as hasn't survived is far more easily replaced than anything Cast Iron.

    Electrons don't give a damn about brand-name, "period correct", size. shape, nor even if goods are mounted in the original location or a cabinet several feet way. So long as the equivalent ratings, routing, and functionality can be provided, they JF do as they are commanded to do.


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