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    Default radial arm drills

    Hope i'm in the right category. Generally speaking going no larger than 4 ft. arm what are considered the better american made radial arm drills say between post world war 2 and 1975 or 80 thank you for reading, Clyde

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    Carlton is often touted as "the best" American made radial drill. However, I don't think you can go wrong with any of the big name players that made radials: American, Fosdick, Cincinnati Bickford, etc. At this stage in the game, finding one in good condition is going to be much more important than whether or not that brand might have been "the best" when it was new.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    Hope i'm in the right category. Generally speaking going no larger than 4 ft. arm what are considered the better american made radial arm drills say between post world war 2 and 1975 or 80 thank you for reading, Clyde
    "No larger than 4 ft" you will probably find a Taiwanese knock-off that is sixty years newer the better deal.

    All three radials 3', 5', 8', I used in the early 1960's were built between First and Second World wars.

    More powerful portables, mag base especially, ELSE BIG mills, portal, gantry, bridge, etc. that could do far more operations, far faster, than ignorant 90-degree to axis holes began consuming most of the radial DP "new" market by around the Korean War period. Then came NC/CNC...

    The "classical" all-manual radial DP can still earn a crust on suitable work, but fewer places actually NEED them enough to dedicate even the space and power budget if the DP itself was "free".

    As some ARE. Nasty machines to remove, rig, transport, and re-install, larger sizes about as tough a rig as machine-tools generally get for their tipsy mass.

    Disclaimer: Much as I loved radials, I have an Alzmetall AB5/S 7 HP "column" drill. Fixed throat depth, but mass and height aside, it needs less floorspace than a BirdPort mill and not a Hell of a lot more space than say "one and a half" tiny Walker-Turners.

    Radials, OTOH, need ROOM, often most of it for the work, not just their own selves. Think drilling into the middle of the side of a mining car body. Hole isn't large. Mining car IS. Without lots of bring-to, position favourably, and take-away space a decent radial is crippled. Enter high-end mag-base or chained-on portables.

    And then.. water jet, laser, etc. holes made BEFORE a plate even becomes a part of a larger structure.

    2CW

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    "No larger than 4 ft" you will probably find a Taiwanese knock-off that is sixty years newer the better deal.
    I have a 3ft 9 in column Taiwan radial and have used a same size Carlton. There's no comparison. The Carltons are a real machine. The imports are a delicate copy.

    I've used Carlton and Cincinnatti Bickford. The Carlton's just looked like the best of the best to me, but the Cincinnatti worked fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I have a 3ft 9 in column Taiwan radial and have used a same size Carlton. There's no comparison. The Carltons are a real machine. The imports are a delicate copy.

    I've used Carlton and Cincinnatti Bickford. The Carlton's just looked like the best of the best to me, but the Cincinnatti worked fine.
    Carleton, Cannedy-Otto, Cincinnati-Bickford, American.. ..Asquith... yah. No argument.

    But where - in TODAY's wurld - d'you find one not already wore-out before Richard Nixon was thrown-out?

    Especially a "baby" one - 5 foot, prolly even more so 8 footers being the more common sizes?

    You did say you HAVE a Taiwanese one, right?


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    There might have been other US made radial drills that had horizontal boring mill "type spindles". But Carlton and American are the only two that I know of. To me that alone makes them the best. Finding one in good condition in that size might be hard to do.

    Andy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy St View Post
    There might have been other US made radial drills that had horizontal boring mill "type spindles". But Carlton and American are the only two that I know of. To me that alone makes them the best. Finding one in good condition in that size might be hard to do.

    Andy
    I have that "type" of spindle on an AB5/S "column" drill. 5 MT, dual azures, one for knock-out drift, the other for locking drift/key.

    However...only 15" of throat before an edge would hit the column. So I'd have been delighted to have had a small radial instead. Usta say the pre-WWII 8-foot American at Galis was so lovely to work with I cudda married her, she hadn't been so old, loose, and grubby.

    .. but still... that 7 HP AB5/S was built early 1950's in "West" Germany. Not a lot about it one could class as "delicate". At right around 4400 lbs avoir, it is only about half a ton lighter than the mill.

    Pure Bullshit LUCK to find one with no slop in the spindle.

    Grand-Old radials are more akin to unicorns. ANY condition, not just "good".
    And then one has to rig-out, TRANSPORT, and rig-in? $$$$

    Too difficult. Too expensive.

    Ergo too many went too long begging for a new home, found it to be the breakers, then a smelter.


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