Removing ram from VN22L
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  1. #1
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    Default Removing ram from VN22L

    Hi,

    I need to remove the ram from my machine,
    To clean and assess wear. Another forum
    Member had done this the smart way, using the table
    But I’ve already removed the table and saddle.

    If I crank the ram as far forward or backward
    As the rack and pinion take it, it still remains
    Very hard to move even trying to support it with an
    Engine hoist.

    The gibs unfortunately screw downwards so cannot be
    Removed until the ram is off it seems.

    I have the motor off already, and the cutterhead, so
    Maybe the ram weights 600lbs?

    If anyone has suggestions?

    Otherwise I can put the table back on but was trying to
    Avoid that because I also need the knee off ultimately.

    Thanks!
    Phil

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    If the saddle is still in place, maybe use blocks and raise the knee up to support the ram at maximum extension, then use the table's Y axis to drag the ram out enough to disengage it. Might need to hold the end of the ram up with the engine hoist while you move the knee back against the column and repeat until the ram is out of the column. Having the table in place would make the above easier.

    Cal

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    Default

    I took mine off using a gantry crane, and I estimated the ram on a #28 between 600 and 800 lbs. At that time, I did not have a hook scale to get an accurate reading.

    BTW, I needed help from the forum here to figure out how to free the ram, but it sounds like you are past that hurdle.. My machine was very filthy and the stop-block bolted to the bottom rear of the ram was not apparent. After someone here clued me in, I was able to find that part in the manual's hand-drawn diagrams as an anonymous rectangular blob placed halfway across the page with no indication of where it belonged in the whole assembly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I took mine off using a gantry crane, and I estimated the ram on a #28 between 600 and 800 lbs. At that time, I did not have a hook scale to get an accurate reading.

    BTW, I needed help from the forum here to figure out how to free the ram, but it sounds like you are past that hurdle.. My machine was very filthy and the stop-block bolted to the bottom rear of the ram was not apparent. After someone here clued me in, I was able to find that part in the manual's hand-drawn diagrams as an anonymous rectangular blob placed halfway across the page with no indication of where it belonged in the whole assembly.

    Well... I removed a stop screw from the front but nothing else!
    Thanks, let me consult the diagram.

    Phil

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    Default

    Probably, I'm the other forum member you're referring to in regards of using the table as the primary aid for sliding forward the ram assembly.
    The memory is a bit foggy right now. But I kind of remember that I had to unbolt the rack in order to get the ram out. Again, I'm going with my bad memory, no pictures or notes, right now. But, if I recall correctly, the rack has at least one end terminated without teeth.
    I think that the challenge you're facing right now is that the engine hoist arm and cylinder are rather springy, making almost impossible to set it at the right tension. If you have enough vertical space, I'd suggest attaching a turnbuckle between the hoist hook and the ram, so that you can operate as finer tension adjustment.

    The ram assembly, complete of motor, overarm and one arbor support of mine weighs exactly 900 lb.

    Paolo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Probably, I'm the other forum member you're referring to in regards of using the table as the primary aid for sliding forward the ram assembly.
    The memory is a bit foggy right now. But I kind of remember that I had to unbolt the rack in order to get the ram out. Again, I'm going with my bad memory, no pictures or notes, right now. But, if I recall correctly, the rack has at least one end terminated without teeth.
    I think that the challenge you're facing right now is that the engine hoist arm and cylinder are rather springy, making almost impossible to set it at the right tension. If you have enough vertical space, I'd suggest attaching a turnbuckle between the hoist hook and the ram, so that you can operate as finer tension adjustment.

    The ram assembly, complete of motor, overarm and one arbor support of mine weighs exactly 900 lb.

    Paolo
    Hi,

    Yes, in the old thread you posted

    How to remove the ram and the knee on a Van Norman 22L

    you reported cranking the ram forward but not removing the rack first. So
    I think you're probably right... the fit is tight anyway, lubrication is dry in there, so any lack of perfect balance will make the ram unwilling to move.

    I'll probably resort to putting the saddle and table back on to make it a safer operation.

    Thanks!

    -Phil


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