Vertical head on No2 B&S Mill
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 70
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default Vertical head on No2 B&S Mill

    I came across and bought this mill mostly for the light duty vertical head, but I might be able to get the machine going.
    I am not familiar with this style of head, it has an adjustable quill, with I suppose is a B&S taper.
    The head will clean up fine, I have been looking for a mill with vert head, now I may be just looking for a mill.







    It looks like, if the quill is moved all the way up, the B&S self holding taper will eject, I will have this disaster in my drive way in a couple of days.
    This is a Hanford machine, appears to have very little use, before it was dragged outside.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    30,233
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Has a draw bar (?), likely regular NMTB 40

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    I think you are right, I was thinking the machine was a lot older then it may be.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Has a draw bar (?), likely regular NMTB 40
    Could be. Seems to be a flange peeking outta the grime. Still might get it back to pre-War Two, so hardly recent.

    But both of my mills with B&S tapers use drawbars as well and the Dividing Head B&S taper "can do".

    Might have all the mill he needs if this one needs more de-rusting sweat than it does gears or knee-drive parts. Straightforward creatures, those were.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    21
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    “Hanford machine” caught my eye, I’m in West Richland just wondering how it came to be in your possession? I keep an eye on the auctions over in Pasco that seems to get a fair bit of Hanford surplus, and I think I remember a surplus store many years ago on the edge of town. I’ve got to believe most of the good stuff is long gone haha


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    30,233
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My error - thought he might be referring to B&S version of Flash Change, named Cam Lock - no draw bar. Thumbnails show some of that

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Could be. Seems to be a flange peeking outta the grime. Still might get it back to pre-War Two, so hardly recent.

    But both of my mills with B&S tapers use drawbars as well and the Dividing Head B&S taper "can do".

    Might have all the mill he needs if this one needs more de-rusting sweat than it does gears or knee-drive parts. Straightforward creatures, those were.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails scan-01.jpg   scan03crop.jpg  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mortomr View Post
    “Hanford machine” caught my eye, I’m in West Richland just wondering how it came to be in your possession? I keep an eye on the auctions over in Pasco that seems to get a fair bit of Hanford surplus, and I think I remember a surplus store many years ago on the edge of town. I’ve got to believe most of the good stuff is long gone haha


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    This machine was surplused out of Hanford in the late 1980s along with many other machines. The facility they were in machined beryllium, and was closed in the 70s, the machines sat for close to 20yrs. One of the big buyers at the time was John at George Washington Machine.
    The mill could of been purchased by John and sold to someone that ended up dragging it outside. The machine is easy to recognize its Gov tags USA H.E.W., and a service co. tag jaco. The machines in the sale were all in good working condition many re-built. I currently have 3 machines that came out of that sale.


    I think this machine is post WW2, this mill does not have the sexy curves of the earlier machines, it looks like an ancient K&T with the flat sides. I tend to think this machine was built for reduced cost.
    The machine had very little wear, I might get lucky and there wont be any busted gears.

    Over the years, there were some great surplus stores selling all kinds of things out of Hanford, I bought hard to find Monarch EE lathe electronics at Art Carpenters surplus in Kennewick.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    The machine had very little wear, I might get lucky and there wont be any busted gears.

    Hanford took as good a care of all their machines as you've showed us already, my bet is nothing bustid nor even badly worn. Rust will soon be off of it, I'm sure!

    If the vertical happens to be B&S, it looks stout enough for larger than # 9, but if # 9 it is, I've got a few items surplus to my two spindles for it, can get you able to grip an endmill or three whilst you search-out more. It's still "out there", at least in #7 & #9. Still works better than R8, lasts longer as well. MUCH longer!

    Just takes patience to accumulate.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    I was thinking it was B&S #9, but I think it is No40, the main spindle is No50. My Brother has two B&S mills, I am sure both vertical heads have B&S taper spindles.
    I should be able to graft a 1" Collet chuck, and make a shank for a Wohlhaupter head, if it is B&S taper, I will be good.
    The machine is not matching up in WW2 era and earlier publications.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    30,233
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    You can see some of that "later" stuff in Practical Treatise on Milling and Milling Machines (by B&S) if you look at such as my 1953 edition

    All the fifty taper jobs are full size heavy duties - not the neat little "Light Type"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    21
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    That’s some neat local history, thanks for sharing.

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    I bought hard to find Monarch EE lathe electronics at Art Carpenters surplus in Kennewick.
    Art’s surplus ....and go-kart shop lol



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    I should be able to graft a 1" Collet chuck, and make a shank for a Wohlhaupter head, if it is B&S taper, I will be good.
    I have but TWO "native" 40-Taper collets, 3/4' and 1" IIRC. Not "through bored" of course, Drawbar, as usual. Schaublins and Deckels used them, so they are "out there".

    My add-on head for the Quartet is a K&T adaptation. As with your one, it gets its drive off the Horizontal spindle, so is already mounting low-down and shorter of vertical daylight than BP & clones might be. Your one has limited quill travel. Mine has none at all.

    Those stubby 40 taper collets are good for mounting boring heads and such on those heads. Stiff goods. No flange. Set back as they are, they don't use-up any daylight, either.
    Last edited by thermite; 11-14-2019 at 01:26 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    I am looking for the arbor support brackets, and found this.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    On the ground now,


    The mill has a silent chain drive, that is still in good shape, I think the motor is 5hp.


    I sprayed the machine with PB Blaster five days ago. and just used a 1/2" wide carbide scraper to test this small area on the table, looks very encouraging!

  15. Likes rustytool, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  16. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    On the ground now,

    The mill has a silent chain drive, that is still in good shape, I think the motor is 5hp.
    Sounds about right.

    Presuming it is the "pioneer" in such things chain-ish, the Morse rocker joint/ rocker-link, comparing dimensions to capacity should find it over-engineered by at least double - four times expected need even more likely:

    Morse Inverted Tooth Chain Drives | Chain | Sprockets | Drive Components

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    174
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    21

    Default

    That looks like a heck of a big job.

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 86turbodsl View Post
    That looks like a heck of a big job.
    First one I ever used was its older line-shaft-conversion baby brother. It was not 'til much later I was allowed onto the larger "Milwaukee" (K&T) next on the line.

    Horizontals. Gotta love 'em.

    Only word they know is "EAT!!!"

    The rest is up to the mill hand.

    And then they do exactly that... crunch-crunch-crunch-crunch-crunch.....

    Mouse-nibble yer tiny-whiney R8 heart out, BirdPorts...


  19. #18
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    It is looking like its not going to take as much time as I thought to get it working, after that I can work more on the details as I use the machine.
    I was happy with what I saw under the rust in the photo above, after pushing a little off with a carbide scraper. The rest of the machine has chunky items like the way overbuilt chain drive with clutch.
    I am going to knock the rust off the knee/saddle first, get that moving.
    And another load of salvage machines rolls in, one moves out.


    Got the oil and dirt off the tag, I thought it was the light model.


    It has a war board tag, and with the Hanford tag above. The ser# is 5754, with a separate feed motor on the knee for feeds, and location of the coolant pump, seems to place the machine 1944-45 and likely was a new machine at the nuclear reservation.
    Last edited by donie; 11-23-2019 at 10:22 PM.

  20. Likes Paolo_MD, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  21. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    28,047
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    8691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    It is looking like its not going to take as much time as I thought to get it working, after that I can work more on the details as I use the machine.
    I was happy with what I saw under the rust in the photo above, after pushing a little off with a carbide scraper. The rest of the machine has chunky items like the way overbuilt chain drive with clutch.
    I am going to knock the rust off the knee/saddle first, get that moving.
    Big job, and sore messy, but ....it's got a lot of large, flat, areas.

    This is one I'd be for masking all the tags, then trying-out the soda-blast gear I've had put by for some years but not yet found a good match to a need for.

    Soda-blast first, any residue comes out as part of the finer detail work, wasn't as risky as grit to begin with. Also got walnut shells and plastic media, plus one of those small-zone "air-brush" size guns. Great for inside corners and similar complex shapes.

    But still. Soda has a good rep. Surely gentler than a needle-scaler yah don't seem to need!




    Mind, I'm too old and already messed-up to much give a damn about leaded paint risk. Over worried about? Dunno. But modest precautions against the harm of them aren't all that complex nor expensive.

    2CW

  22. #20
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    4,666
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    Getting this machine situated, and with a pallet jack to move it around. I took about 30 minutes and scraped the rust off the dovetail, the metal looks good and shows the original scraping, now I will relieve some of the weight of the table with straps and a hoist, loosen the gib, and move the saddle over the clean area. Then, scrape the rust on the knee behind the table. It looks at that rate perhaps 8 hrs to de rust the ways and column way and face.


    The machine has low hours, one of the indicators of that is the condition of items that can get beat up like the feed dial and the knurled rings, all still crisp looking.

  23. Likes M.B. Naegle, cyanidekid, TheOldCar liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •