5 Flute Face Mill Speeds and Feeds - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    length tool sticks out of holder and tool holder length are important factors. a tool sticking out 2X longer is 2x2x2 or 8x more flex and if 3x longer its 3x3x3 or 27x more flex
    .
    normally inserts can take a certain feed per tooth per revolution like .003 to .008 ipt feed and a certain sfpm range which effect rpm
    .
    with harder metals and if cutter and or part is vibrating you usually have to lower rpm and lower ipt feed rate. if breaking corners off mill usually feed too high. basically a soft metal might easily allow .008 ipt feed where a harder metal you might have problems with more than .004 ipt feed. and a lower rpm might be help alot for lower vibration too
    .
    depth and width of cut. harder metals usually use or need lower Depth of cut. facemill usually try not to slot or 100% width of cut. usually better to aim for about 75% width of cut. and if depth of cut too high for part and machine cause of vibration might have to use lower depths of cut too
    .
    most keep a record or database with a standardize tool setup with tolerances on tool length and tool holder type and record feeds and speeds tried as well as any sudden tool failures. thus by learning from previous experiences you can avoid making the same mistakes or bad choices again. eventually tool history will show what works best.
    .
    metal can vary not just by alloy type but some metal has more hard spots or slag in it. when hard spots get as big as grain of rice size it can destroy inserts in a second. smaller hard spots may go unnoticed but cause short tool life.
    .
    in general most pick moderate settings. if a car can go as fast as 120 miles per hour most dont drive that fast cause if you crash car than thats not fast recovering from accident. ultimately a moderate speed like 60mph has higher chance of success. milling feeds and speeds are like that. a expensive part or expensive tool you usually dont want to damage either risking maximum speed and feed and high depths of cuts. obviously the faster you go the more risk there is. if failure is not a option or rather if working on a $10,000. part most try more moderate feeds and speeds rather that risk scrapping or damaging the part.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hardspots2.jpg  

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkoenig View Post
    I would return it and spend way less money on a real speeds and feeds calculator like HSM Advisor.
    I'd just read it in order to avoid going thru life like a wiki-reliant monkey.

    Oh, and then I might buy that nifty app too for convenience.

  4. #23
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    A 3" indexable is probably too big to run on a VF-2 in 4140 prehard with good results unless it's a shallow finish pass. You have a Yamaha R-6, not a Ford F-350. I'd use a smaller solid carbide cutter (1/2", material specific, Helical makes good ones) and high-feed programming to get better results in the same or less time.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    A: What is the diameter of the cutter? RPM means nothing without knowing diameter.
    B: WTF Is TechMet? Some cheapo Chinese insert?
    C: What brand is the face mill?
    D: How rigid is your setup? A block in a vise? Plate on the table? 12" overhang unsupported?
    Techmet is a big time supplier of carbide blanks, Fullerton tool, Gorilla mill, just to name a few use there carbide. Direct competitor to Ceritizit. Couple of years ago they introduced a turning line and some milling inserts. There is a couple of us distributors here in michigan with the line, I have had good luck with there inserts in some sandvik cutter bodies, especially the price for a job shop (really affordable).

    For the OP, Your spinning it at 1018 speeds not 4140 PH. Slow it down, 300SFM, 60% radial.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pfmarkeytoolguy View Post
    For the OP, Your spinning it at 1018 speeds not 4140 PH. Slow it down, 300SFM, 60% radial.
    I agree, many have said that here also. If the 4140HT is really 34rc it's running higher strength than only a few steel houses would supply. Tempering @ 1100F° instead of 1200F° buys you 150Ksi vs 135Ksi strength but it also drops the impact properties 15%ish and most folks don't like that.

    Good luck,
    Matt
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails aisi_4142.jpg  

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    1) most machines have a load meter and that will tell you roughly how much available motor hp you are using.
    .
    2) tool length stickout, tool holder length, effects vibration as well as part and fixture vibration. obviously extreme vibration can damage cutting edges fast
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    3) if cutting tool corners breaking off in general feed and depth of cut too high. sudden tool failure usually is not a good thing
    .
    vibration control usually means lower rpm and feed and lower depth of cut. got not much to do with cutting limits of a rigid setup. if you dont have a rigid setup you have to adjust cutting parameters to avoid sudden tool failure

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  9. #27
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    sent a PM to the op

  10. #28
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    Might find the weakness of your set-up (if there is one) and stiffen it up to provide better part solid holding.

    Might cut feed rate and depth of cut by 10% (or 20% )increments until you find the sweet spot of lower costs.

    Might gauge your mill cutter to see the inserts are all/some at the same height and same at lead cutting edges..

    loop check (eyeball with a loop) your inserts to see if they are chipping or wearing at the beginning of the work cycle.

    Be sure your coolant is not being diverted if being used..flood or dry is best.

  11. #29
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    As said the SFM is too high. Get yourself a 2" Iscar HM390 FTD. ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - HM390 FTD-15 : 3106804 - HM390 FTD D2.00-5-.75-15

    I run these in my VF2SS & VF4SS in 4140CFA and prehard. Should be able to do 500sfm and .005-.006"ipt @ .15" depth of cut. Run Dry with the 808 inserts.


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