7068 t6 aluminum or kyron max composite
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    Default 7068 t6 aluminum or kyron max composite

    Any word of online shops or Denver area that will machine screws from these materials like m6x15mm taperheads and m5x10mm panheads. I see alot of titanium and 7075 but not 7068 or this composite? I read they have higher fatigue life then their brothers, any help would be greatly appreciated one roll of TP for the answer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gelopenoaco View Post
    Any word of online shops or Denver area that will machine screws from these materials like m6x15mm taperheads and m5x10mm panheads. I see alot of titanium and 7075 but not 7068 or this composite? I read they have higher fatigue life then their brothers, any help would be greatly appreciated one roll of TP for the answer
    Typically you don't want to machine screws from composite stock, you lose a lot of the beneficial properties of composites when you cut the fibers.

    7068 doesn't get you much over 7075 except for bragging rights, if you really need that strength and low weight you're better off going to Ti.

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    Thanks for the reply. I was going to use in an off-road application where I read the fatigue of the 68 would be better. I should of worded the composite better molded is what I would want which I can't seem to find either. Yep the bragging would be cool to but not my goal, if I can't find anywhere I'll order the 7075 I've had some sprockets that were great in that alloy, alum weight with near ti strength

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    7075 is a common alloy. 7068 is not. Fatigue strength is better for 7075 in the T73 condition, but tensile strength is of course lower. Maybe look into that?

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    are you thinking of making an actual threaded fastener ( you said “machine screws from”) in these materials? You are choosing these to “save weight” in a off road vehicle?
    Forgive me if I’m mistaken, but that sounds really [idiotic] questionable for so many reasons.

    Just consider, in aerospace where weight does REALLY matter, how often do they use aluminum screws ( and “machined” ones at that) ?

    I seriously hope this is just a decorative application.

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    Md x l is a pretty common designation of diameter and length for metric fasteners.

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    how much weight are you going to save with those special M6x15 and M5x10 screws? especially on an off road vehicle...

    m6x15 screw wight in steel is around 6 grams, 2.2 in aluminum and 3.5 in titanium, now do the math for how many screws you need to change from steel to aluminum to get 1kg worth of weight savings, and then consider the cost - this will turn out to be a very expensive performance gain

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    What kind of off road vehicle? Those sound pretty small for truck or even motorcycle. Mountain bikes use that size in suspension components, but most mfrs will void your frame warranty if they aren't case hardened steel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wsurfer View Post
    What kind of off road vehicle? Those sound pretty small for truck or even motorcycle. Mountain bikes use that size in suspension components, but most mfrs will void your frame warranty if they aren't case hardened steel.
    Thanks for the replies to all. Wasn't expecting so many even the idiot comment lol. Would be for use on 2 Mountain bikes: brake rotors f&b, clamps, stem, cage mounts about 40 bolts per bike not worried about breaking them or warranty, 2018 Jamis Dragonslayer is model for mtb dudes great ride just heavy for bunnyhoppin

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    Dude, seriously learn something about fasteners before using aluminum screws to hold on brake rotors or handle bars. You are on the short list for the next Darwin awards going down this road.

    Please don’t. Really. Sorry if I’m being a bit blunt here, but trying to save your backside bro

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    what I want to know now is how big is the water bottle and is it mounted to the frame?

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    Goal is to be able to hop onto concrete picnic table/ large rocks in height easy on a BMX bike but mtb is way heavier, just 1/2 lb would be crazy noticeable for just bolts, all add up just changing out forks& pedals with higher end parts will be another lb, cranks another half lb. This is just fun nothing serious. I remember my first 6al4v ti crank spindle I bought at 16 from mowing lawns and being amazed, a kid stole that bike when I was 23 when I went to get my dog some water at the dog park and left it against the fence I remember watching him ride off about 50 ft away. We had a good run lol

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    Haha all good I prefer blunt. Probably on that list but so was riding a bmx bike with no brakes or doing 65 on my snowboard, I read the 7068 is stronger than ti and alot of bike shops will sell you ti

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    Damn water, I heard you can carbonate it with helium to save some grams. Lol. 24 oz full

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    The weight savings is pretty small with special fasteners, but it can do things for the rider mentally. The mental boost of riding your tricked out bike can make you ride/try harder.

    I've run just 3 rotor screws on my Santa Cruz for 15+ years Saves 50% of the weight! Used nylon screws for bottle cages but replaced them annually. Learned to do that after having them break after about 2 years of use and losing the bottle and cage. Would not use aluminum fasteners on the stem or seatpost but no problem on things like derailleur or brake mounting (Hayes or "post" style only) or shifter. Best boost to the ride though is lighter wheels and tubeless tires.

    Lightweight fasteners are all over my Ducati. Standard fare. Most are steel of some type, but almost all have some kind of reduced head. Imagine like a button head socket cap screw but with the radius of the button inverted. Another style is a reduced hex size but with a flange under the hex so that the bearing surface area remains the same. Again, not a big savings, but every little bit helps when weight control is part of the design requirement. It's why even the kickstand is forged aluminum.

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    Not sure where you are getting your strength information. 7068 yield is about 100Ksi, Ti is about 130 Ksi. The specific strength of 7068 might be slightly better, but you have fixed fastener sizes so specific strength isn't relevant. In addition, Ti is more malleable, so is likely to report it's imminent failure more readily. On a mountain bike there may also be corrosion issues, Ti wins hands down there.

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    Funny thing is first time I looked it up this forum popped up. Then I started looking around. I do believe I looked up ti heated to 800 degrees by mistake on matweb the numbers you described were right below

    Machinability of 7068 vs 7075 or 6061-T6 aluminum

    Tennalum(R) 7068 Ultra Strength Aluminum | Precision Armament

    7068 High Strength Aluminum

    Aluminum 7068-T6; 7068-T6511 Rod & Bar

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    The best thing about 7068 is it retains more of its strength at higher temperatures.
    The worst thing is availability and cost.
    Most metal suppliers do not stock it.
    Unless you plan on buying a mill run good luck on finding it.
    If you have a source for 7068 please post it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    The weight savings is pretty small with special fasteners, but it can do things for the rider mentally. The mental boost of riding your tricked out bike can make you ride/try harder.

    I've run just 3 rotor screws on my Santa Cruz for 15+ years Saves 50% of the weight! Used nylon screws for bottle cages but replaced them annually. Learned to do that after having them break after about 2 years of use and losing the bottle and cage. Would not use aluminum fasteners on the stem or seatpost but no problem on things like derailleur or brake mounting (Hayes or "post" style only) or shifter. Best boost to the ride though is lighter wheels and tubeless tires.

    Lightweight fasteners are all over my Ducati. Standard fare. Most are steel of some type, but almost all have some kind of reduced head. Imagine like a button head socket cap screw but with the radius of the button inverted. Another style is a reduced hex size but with a flange under the hex so that the bearing surface area remains the same. Again, not a big savings, but every little bit helps when weight control is part of the design requirement. It's why even the kickstand is forged aluminum.
    I agree tricked out confidence pushs, I remember doing some Superman's into a foampit and then just going for it off a regular kicker and landed nicely, to much fun. Yep tubeless is nice got the Wtb 3.0 Rangers. Just swapped some glass filled Nylon screws for the bottle holders took off 35 grams was pretty stoked, didn't know they were that light.
    I'll try the 3 cromoly disk bolts upfront, and the 7075t-6 in the back. This Austrian dude says it has to do with the weight of the rider if your under 80 kg then your good with 180mm disk brakes front and 90kg for back.

    Only found these ducatti ☂️ heads.
    Ducati titanium fasteners – Ti64

    Austrian dude
    Aluminium disc brake rotor fixing bolts for IS2000 standard

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    yea thats great man, your confidence is way up, and your gear is way fucked by what you did to boost your "confidence" .. go for it.

    DONT USE ALUMINUM SCREWS ON THE BRAKES OR ANYTHING REMOTELY IMPORTANT.

    seriously, if you take a piss before hopping on your bike, that will knock off 10X the weight savings of the stupid screws.

    ok, go ahead, just make sure you test them going 45 downhill towards a sharp turn right before a 1000Ft drop so we can thin out the gene pool...


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