Anchoring Barfeed w/o holes in the crete.................
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    Default Anchoring Barfeed w/o holes in the crete.................

    Is there a way to anchor a bar feed without drilling holes in the concrete?(infloor heat) I remember a thread where a machine was "glued" in place? And if I have to drill, what kinda anchors are preferred? Any style that I can minimized drill depth?

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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    Is there a way to anchor a bar feed without drilling holes in the concrete?(infloor heat) I remember a thread where a machine was "glued" in place? And if I have to drill, what kinda anchors are preferred? Any style that I can minimized drill depth?
    Not sure what kind of barfeed you have. On my 1.250" - 1.500" machines I took a regular feed tube stand and put it inside of a barrel. I then put the lid on the barrel and cut a hole in the middle for the stand to stick out of.

    2 bags of quick crete mixed and dumped inside later and it is a heavy ass deadman. Barely moves, could add much more concrete if needed.

    I have had machines dance a little bit from indexing fast, repetitively for weeks. The machines are all 2400-3200 lbs.

    I am sure there is some type of epoxy/glue that would work great. I have a friend in the industry and he told me the stuff used in snowboards nowadays is leaps and bounds better than 10 years ago. Much lighter and cures harder. Probably more environmentally friendly too. He said they develop new stuff all the time.

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    Interesting - I never thought of that issue with in-floor heat. How close to the surface does the PEX run? If I ever have that luxury I'll know to either run it 3-4 inches down or measure and mark the runs. How thick is your floor?

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    Old timer trick is a square of tar paper under each foot. Equipment stays stuck in place without drilling yet can be moved again if needed.

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    epoxy-in anchors. The jigglin of the bar feed seems to loosen the red head expanding type anchors.

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    You can also look at the pex pattern with an IR camera. It might help if you turn off the floor for a day or two to cool it all down so the heat shows up better on the IR.
    Another way to see where the pipes are is to again cool it a little bit and pour alcohol on it, it will dry first where the heat pipes are. Heat needs to ON for either of these to work, so a cool floor should ask for heat as soon as you turn it back on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Antarctica View Post
    Interesting - I never thought of that issue with in-floor heat. How close to the surface does the PEX run? If I ever have that luxury I'll know to either run it 3-4 inches down or measure and mark the runs. How thick is your floor?
    My crete is thin in a few areas due to the morons that poured my floor......................................Last thing I want to do is drill into a line. I can use a temp gun to find a line, but doesn't do me much good if the lathe is placed and the bar feed location is fixed.................

    Short servo barfeed btw......................

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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    My crete is thin in a few areas due to the morons that poured my floor......................................Last thing I want to do is drill into a line. I can use a temp gun to find a line, but doesn't do me much good if the lathe is placed and the bar feed location is fixed.................

    Short servo barfeed btw......................
    Goal is the barfeed is "registered" to the lathe's spindle anyway.. , not to the floor.

    How about you do the tarpaper trick, then fab a pair of rails from bar-feed to the lathe.. or to the lathe's anchors - or it's anchor POINTS if it is not anchored, either?

    Wouldn't have to carry any mass. Just stand up to - or correct-for - vibration & such as sources of "attempted displacement".

    If it is SERIOUS enough a problem? Steel plate under the lathe that reaches out far enough to pick-up the feeder..drill and tap ..or tack-weld anchors ATOP it.

    Floor and heat system piping doesn't get involved as anything more complicated than a flat top-surface.

    2CW

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    What about grout?

    Programmed via Mazatrol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    What about grout?

    Programmed via Mazatrol
    Grout may of may not even be "adhesive". PRIMARY role is even filling of a gap.

    The epoxied plate - one with a close match to the thermal coefficient of expansion of the 'crete (Iron and its alloys, usually..) is about as good as it gets for surface-mount grip.

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    Devcon 10610 aluminum putty is holding 2-3 of our bar feeders right now. Clean 'crete and feet well and apply the epoxy. To remove just heat the foot up and give it a rap with a hammer. Epoxy can be easily sanded flush to the concrete after removal.

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    My Kitamura 5X was epoxied to the floor to keep it from walking around at 100% when I bought it. It popped loose without much fuss with a toe jack.

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    I would use one of the Simpson set epoxies under the feet. You could rough up the floor underneath to get better adhesion, but it might rip out the concrete if you ever have to move it. You will also have to figure out leveling pretty quickly after applying it.

    We use the Set 3G to dowel in all thread to existing concrete before pouring something adjacent. It is really impressive stuff.

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    PM member Tony36(spelling?) maybe?.............mentioned machines glued/epoxied to the floor. When moved they actually pulled concrete off the surface of the floor.............maybe heat would have prevented that, but there must be something out there.............Devcon 10610 was mentioned above............I'll look into it.

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    There are industrial epoxies made just for anchoring machine mounting plates to concrete.

    The company I worked for in the 90's used it, and it worked well. Like said, if the plates ever needed to be moved, a bit of heat and a blow or two from the side with a sledgehammer breaks it loose.

    Not sure where to buy it...Google may be of some luck?

    ToolCat

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    There are industrial epoxies made just for anchoring machine mounting plates to concrete.

    The company I worked for in the 90's used it, and it worked well. Like said, if the plates ever needed to be moved, a bit of heat and a blow or two from the side with a sledgehammer breaks it loose.

    Not sure where to buy it...Google may be of some luck?

    ToolCat
    Loctite has, in my experience, excellent user tech support. I bet they could steer you the right direction.

    Programmed via Mazatrol

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    The PL series of construction adhesives available at any building supply would be the ticket.

    They are POWERFULLY strong, and stick to just about everything.

    Released with sufficient heat.

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    I had my mazak Quick turn glued to the concrete. Made 4 steel plates about 4x6" and 1" thick with threaded holes and countersunk a little for the machine feet. Ground the epoxy off the concrete. Rough leveled the machine without the plates. Put the plates with epoxy glue underneath under the feet and let it cure. Leveled machine and screwed down to the plates. The plates took some concrete with them after I removed them (after machine was moved).

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    If you got heat in your ‘crete. Use ‘poxy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    Is there a way to anchor a bar feed without drilling holes in the concrete?(infloor heat) I remember a thread where a machine was "glued" in place? And if I have to drill, what kinda anchors are preferred? Any style that I can minimized drill depth?
    I always had my LNS' drilled and anchored in. Ugly things can happen if a bent bar begins moving a bar feed.

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