Chip load and Surface feeds
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Chip load and Surface feeds

    How do you know what Surface feed to start a Calculation with. Do you start at 100 and go from there. I never could figure that step out. Thanks for the help?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    1,894
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    493
    Likes (Received)
    416

    Default

    Willy,
    I hear you, there are several things I do to get speeds, feeds, sfm, etc.
    Get chart, call your tooling rep. or through some mud against the wall and see what sticks. I work 99% with cast iron so I am pretty familiar with settings.
    Use the numbers from the chart or rep as a starting point, I always start conservatively and work from there. Familiarize your self with tool geometry, positive neg, neutral rake nose radius etc. It takes time but you will be able to obtain how cutting is going by sound, feel (placing your finger on tool holder; sensing for vibrations, sound as well.
    In closing IMHO it is a mix of art, science, and your senses. Keep your setup as rigid as possible. I keep a note book of different speeds and feeds for turning and milling what works what does not. When milling large 200#+ pieces I brace with wood sometimes to mitigate chatter. Also don't be afraid to fine tune using your spd feed overrides. Each piece has it own natural resonance, at which it will shake rattle and roll and chatter itself to pieces just a little tweak on the over rides will get you into that sweet spot. Just the way I approach "dialing in".

    Sure there are other folks here that have MORE knowledge that I will chime in with better ideas for you.


    Doug

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    3,126
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1515
    Likes (Received)
    711

    Default

    If I understand your question, you would like to know where to find (or what to use to find) the suggested SFM of a given tool & material combination.

    If so, may I recommend a (really inexpensive) program called MEPro,
    It will "get you on paper" in terms of good (albeit: conservative) SFM recc's for a wide range of tools and materials.
    PS, it is sold by M Rainy (spelling?) on this forum.

    Beyond that:
    1) Tool manufactures will specify SFM's and feed for their tools.
    2) The Web
    3) Here
    4) The Machinery's Handbook
    5) There are quite a few apps for your phone as well.

    If I missed your question entirely, sorry. It's been a hell of a day!

    Doug.

  4. Likes lonestar1224 liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Sussex, England
    Posts
    3,138
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    635

    Default

    The old fashioned paper nomogram / nomograph where you lay a ruler across a bunch of printed scales and see what values make sense with the particular material, cutter et al combination is still the best way to get a general feel for whats going on. Unfortunately I don't know of any that are remotely modern in content.

    Calculators are great for specific values but, as the OP says, you need to have some idea where to start. With nomogram you can fix a point on one scale and swing the ruler about to see what other values go with it.

    Always felt you could do some very interesting things with a touch screen tablet display using data from a modern calculator. Maybe someone computer savvy could take shot at it.

    Clive

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Alabama
    Posts
    246
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    182
    Likes (Received)
    122

    Default

    Take a look at HSMAdvisor or similar. Helical Milling Advisor works good for their tools. Machinery's Handbook is always an option too.

  7. Likes doug925 liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,108
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    83
    Likes (Received)
    416


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2