Climb vs conventional milling in HSM toolpaths to maximize production - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Ya I don't go max because our machines will never reach it*. But I thought it might be worth a shot on using rapids for OP to cut cycle time.

    Didn't see machine type, but if you have smoothing (filtering-accuracy or whatnot) settings you can adjust be sure to make use of those too.

    * for clarity, our parts are small, we don't have enough acceleration to even get close to max feed in an inch or two.
    Sounds like the rare problem of having TOO much machine for the job. On occasion I have some parts that I have to run that are about 1.5" in diameter on a 500mm Rohm chuck. It looks completely ridiculous.

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    InventorHSM has a "both ways adaptive" check box that slows the conventional path feedrate by 10ish percent. I use a Maritool serrated rougher on larger parts that works well. It is a little louder on return/conventional direction, but saves some time without having to run full rapids. Endmill seems fine after a lot of aluminum so far.

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    Im going to attach a video for referance, as to how I handle simple parts in my shitty old Fadal.
    I've programmed and ran a lot of much higher end equipment, but to be honest, the fadal does pretty damned good at just chewing away.



    Atomkindler does (or did) the same sort of thing on a Fadal...

    Yes, its not 100 cubes, but it gives you an idea at least.

    In the Makino A51nx I used to run, 14000rpm, 600ipm, .06" step over.
    Loads of coolant, send it both ways. Leave stock to account for cutter pull for a clean up pass or two.

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  5. #24
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    I would switch to a Destiny Diamondback with the stealth coating. You can easily run it at spindle max on a 20k machine, unless you manage to get aggressive enough that it stalls the spindle. Most other badass chipbreaker endmills are imitations of the Destiny formula. Some might be a little better, but it will be well into the point of diminishing returns.

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    Also, I'm not seeing enough questions about your shape compensations settings. What controller? What CAM? Is your look ahead dialed in correctly? Are your re-position moves set to feed instead of rapid?

    A lot of folks don't truly understand how the look ahead works on their particular machine. Fine tuning of your rouging cycle tolerance can shave a ton of time off of both the cut and the re-positioning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    Sounds like the rare problem of having TOO much machine for the job. On occasion I have some parts that I have to run that are about 1.5" in diameter on a 500mm Rohm chuck. It looks completely ridiculous.
    Ya LoL. It's strange we make such tiny parts, but we have 2 VF4's. Mainly those get used because we have 4 vises on them. Once in a while we do a large part, a few months ago I made a part that used every bit of the Z travel on the VF4. And later this week will be doing a 1/2x20x20 plate, but mostly 1-2-3" parts.


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