Which CNC Mill
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Which CNC Mill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Which CNC Mill

    I making transition in to CNC machinig from manual. What used machine (ebay) would be recommend with the programming new enough no to cause any issue moving forward? I have had some but little Gcode experience, most of my equip converts from my cad programs for me. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    936
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    My advice is to get something with a Fanuc controller, or "Fanuc style" as the programming and coding will be MUCH easier.
    When buying used CNCs,:
    1)See it run! If not running and not under power, beware. It could be a brain dead boat anchor that will be a real PROJECT to get running again.
    2)Make sure manufacturer still supports with parts and tech. Many Taiwan builders go under, only to re-surface and when they do, the previous machines no longer
    have any tech support.
    3)Make sure it has manuals/schematics/parts/ladder books. There is an EXTENSIVE amount of literature that comes with a CNC and much of it gets LOST over the years. Without it, you could literally spend as much on the books (if even still available) as you did on the machine.
    4)Avoid orphan machines/controls. Stuff that isn't made anymore. It could be a NIGHTMARE for parts.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    95
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    What travels are you looking for? Sprindle RPM requiremnts? What materials do you usually run?

  4. Likes mhajicek, digger doug liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasJRizzo View Post
    My advice is to get something with a Fanuc controller, or "Fanuc style" as the programming and coding will be MUCH easier.
    When buying used CNCs,:
    1)See it run! If not running and not under power, beware. It could be a brain dead boat anchor that will be a real PROJECT to get running again.
    2)Make sure manufacturer still supports with parts and tech. Many Taiwan builders go under, only to re-surface and when they do, the previous machines no longer
    have any tech support.
    3)Make sure it has manuals/schematics/parts/ladder books. There is an EXTENSIVE amount of literature that comes with a CNC and much of it gets LOST over the years. Without it, you could literally spend as much on the books (if even still available) as you did on the machine.
    4)Avoid orphan machines/controls. Stuff that isn't made anymore. It could be a NIGHTMARE for parts.
    Than you, this was the information I was looking for.

  6. Likes DouglasJRizzo liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    3,365
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    377
    Likes (Received)
    1918

    Default

    Haas vf2ss, great machines...buy as new as you can afford. Controller is MUCH simpler than a fanuc.

  8. Likes mhajicek liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Aberdeen, UK
    Posts
    4,742
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1749
    Likes (Received)
    2307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasJRizzo View Post
    My advice is to get something with a Fanuc controller, or "Fanuc style" as the programming and coding will be MUCH easier
    Easier than what exactly?? When you're talking about ease of use Fanuc are RIGHT at the bottom of that list.

    Everything else you wrote is good advice tho...

  10. Likes plastikdreams, mhajicek liked this post
  11. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Micmac1 View Post
    What travels are you looking for? Sprindle RPM requiremnts? What materials do you usually run?
    Travel around 40" x 20", 316l stainless is a majority portion of the work. As far as spindle RPM's, I guess the largest spread I can. The Speeds will be faster than I'm used to with the Manual. Thanks

  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    3,365
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    377
    Likes (Received)
    1918

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    Easier than what exactly?? When you're talking about ease of use Fanuc are RIGHT at the bottom of that list.

    Everything else you wrote is good advice tho...
    Is is fanook or fanik?

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    5,364
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1193
    Likes (Received)
    659

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    936
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    Easier than what exactly?? When you're talking about ease of use Fanuc are RIGHT at the bottom of that list.

    Everything else you wrote is good advice tho...
    The "easier" parts comes when trying to get stuff to work. Many folk know Fanuc G code and cycles, and everyone else's controller, including by beloved Okuma OSP, falls in somewhere behind.

    When training a newbie or someone working from home, generic Fanuc is much easier. Also, when it comes to post processing.

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6,162
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5767
    Likes (Received)
    3936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Is is fanook or fanik?
    Yes.




    1234char

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6,162
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5767
    Likes (Received)
    3936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasJRizzo View Post
    The "easier" parts comes when trying to get stuff to work. Many folk know Fanuc G code and cycles, and everyone else's controller, including by beloved Okuma OSP, falls in somewhere behind.

    When training a newbie or someone working from home, generic Fanuc is much easier. Also, when it comes to post processing.
    I can see that argument if they were maybe hand programming at a cnc lathe, but a cnc mill is typically programmed with cad/cam. Hand coding for a mill isn't efficient at all unless all they're wanting is drilled/tapped holes.

  17. #13
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2924
    Likes (Received)
    1536

    Default

    It's hard to find something easier to use than a Haas. Fanuc is far more difficult (going through several layers of softkeys just to load a program...). Get something newer than 2008, with probing.

  18. Likes Booze Daily liked this post
  19. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    217
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    18
    Likes (Received)
    63

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Is is fanook or fanik?
    I've always heard

    Robot guys say fanik

    CNC guys say fanook

    I don't know what to do if you have a Fanuc robot tending a machining center with a Fanuc CNC controller.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    4,595
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13950
    Likes (Received)
    5618

    Default

    Fannik is how they say it, so it's how I say it.

    That said, FANUC is an acronym: F*ing American No Understand Control

  21. Likes mhajicek, Booze Daily liked this post
  22. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    936
    Likes (Received)
    755

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mtndew View Post
    I can see that argument if they were maybe hand programming at a cnc lathe, but a cnc mill is typically programmed with cad/cam. Hand coding for a mill isn't efficient at all unless all they're wanting is drilled/tapped holes.
    A lot of mill work is simple facing, slotting and drilling, so hand programming is frequently done.
    You mentioned CAD/CAM, and you're right - a generic Fanuc post is much easier than many other controllers.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •