CNC wiring design
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  1. #1
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    Default CNC wiring design

    Trying to understand the basics of the wiring in my machine (SV-2412 with Fanuc Oi-mate_MC control).

    Some of the wires from the I/O boards go in a 50-pin cable to a breakout board (terminal block) which then split off and go to relays, etc. Others wires go from the I/O board 50-pin cable straight to connections and skip the breakout board. Why do some wires need to go to a breakout board and others don't and can go straight to a component from the I/O board? It seems like the breakout board just adds another connection that isn't needed since its passive and isn't one of the active types of breakout boards that protects the wiring by transferring the signal across an electronic connection to isolate the signal.

    And most (all?) of the wires go to the left side of the panel to a long vertical terminal strip and then across that strip to another wire labeled the same and then to somewhere else. Why is that long terminal strip there? It just seems like it just adds another connection that could fail. Is it mostly so a technician can touch/connect to the wires for diagnostics (it looks like the strip has a place on each connection to put a spade type connector into)? Or is it just so that someone can read the labels on the strip for clarity so that they don't have to try to find each wire somewhere else? IOW it's like a switchboard and the convenience of knowing where all the wires are at is higher priority than the extra connection reliability?

  2. #2
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    Some pictures to accompany the question would help.

    They didnt do any of it without reason. . . probably.

  3. #3
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    AS a guess, some connections vary with the options on the machine, others do not. So some you wire straight in and others you bring too a termination so you can add things at will

  4. Likes digger doug, sigmatero liked this post
  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sigmatero View Post
    Trying to understand the basics of the wiring in my machine (SV-2412 with Fanuc Oi-mate_MC control).

    Some of the wires from the I/O boards go in a 50-pin cable to a breakout board (terminal block) which then split off and go to relays, etc. Others wires go from the I/O board 50-pin cable straight to connections and skip the breakout board. Why do some wires need to go to a breakout board and others don't and can go straight to a component from the I/O board? It seems like the breakout board just adds another connection that isn't needed since its passive and isn't one of the active types of breakout boards that protects the wiring by transferring the signal across an electronic connection to isolate the signal.

    And most (all?) of the wires go to the left side of the panel to a long vertical terminal strip and then across that strip to another wire labeled the same and then to somewhere else. Why is that long terminal strip there? It just seems like it just adds another connection that could fail. Is it mostly so a technician can touch/connect to the wires for diagnostics (it looks like the strip has a place on each connection to put a spade type connector into)? Or is it just so that someone can read the labels on the strip for clarity so that they don't have to try to find each wire somewhere else? IOW it's like a switchboard and the convenience of knowing where all the wires are at is higher priority than the extra connection reliability?
    Is your machine bouncing down the road ????

  6. #5
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    Many manufacturers like the flexibility of being able to separate the control cabinet from the machine tool.

    Having all external I/O wires land on a terminal strip (or bulkhead plugs) near the cabinet entry/exit makes it easier to disconnect and reconnect.

  7. Likes digger doug, rick-b liked this post

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