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    Lightbulb A decent speed and feed chart

    hello all i want to ask a question to some ppl that will be able to answer this question once and for all. does anyone know of a good reference guide or chart for speed and feed rates based on tooling and material??? also i wanted to know what everyone uses for this. most the time i start out with an experienced guess and go from there. theoretically i would like a chart or grid that i look at that would tell me the max speed and feed i can use for the tool and material combonation, or better yet when i choose the tool in mastercam it already loads it for me. any help on this is greatly appreciated!

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    Google CNC Cookbook or Gwizard. It has a comprehensive data base with materials and speeds and feeds and works well for most applications both turning and milling.

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    here we go again, must have fastest feeds and speeds. Fast is not in the least bit important, how many you have made at the end of the day is

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    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    here we go again, must have fastest feeds and speeds. Fast is not in the least bit important, how many you have made at the end of the day is
    And most likely the only thing this guy has cut is his toe nails...
    Have you ever CUT METAL??? worked in a Shop?? Served an APPRENTICESHIP????

    My guess is nope... just another cad jockey turned into a programer
    Is that how it's done these days???

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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    And most likely the only thing this guy has cut is his toe nails...
    Have you ever CUT METAL??? worked in a Shop?? Served an APPRENTICESHIP????

    My guess is nope... just another cad jockey turned into a programer
    Is that how it's done these days???
    Come on Gary , give the lad a break, he is using his experience? We had one a few weeks back who had 3 whole months experience and he was ready to change the USA this week, next week the world. I bet when he cut his toenails he used carbide scissors. Or did I just invent them?

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    This is why people on here stop asking questions and helping others because of comments like the above ........GROW UP

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephon0913 View Post
    hello all i want to ask a question to some ppl that will be able to answer this question once and for all. does anyone know of a good reference guide or chart for speed and feed rates based on tooling and material??? :
    Sheesh.... don't want much do you?

    When you find the croc of gold at the end of the rainbow, grab the book next to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephon0913 View Post
    hello all i want to ask a question to some ppl that will be able to answer this question once and for all. does anyone know of a good reference guide or chart for speed and feed rates based on tooling and material??? also i wanted to know what everyone uses for this. most the time i start out with an experienced guess and go from there. theoretically i would like a chart or grid that i look at that would tell me the max speed and feed i can use for the tool and material combonation, or better yet when i choose the tool in mastercam it already loads it for me. any help on this is greatly appreciated!

    Well your best bet is the insert guidelines, but be aware they are best case scenario. Depth of cut, coolant application, and machine rigidity / part setup all play a major factor ( almost as important as "speeds and feeds" )

    When trying to get longevity out of your program and setup you need to factor in all these variables to get things right.

    I could tell you that :

    Mild steel (1018)/ C12L14 = 800 sfpm
    4140 ANN / 8620 = 600 sfpm
    4340 HT = 350 sfpm
    4140 HT = 400 sfpm
    304 / 316 SS = 275 sfpm
    17-4PH900-1150 = 300 sfpm
    6061/2011 AL = 3000 sfpm

    all using a CNMG 432 PM 4225 insert from Sandvik. With the feeds and depths of cuts comes careful consideration of your setup.

    With a Mori Seiki SL150 ( smaller machine ) the maximum depth of cut i can take is around 0.250" Diameter on mild steel, 0.200" on 4340 HT and i would never go more than 0.012 feedrate.

    On our new NLX2500 i can take that same job and push 0.320" diameter or 0.018" feedrate on midsteel and easily do 0.250" at 0.014" on 4340 HT.

    Now i would never run that when using a tailstock, or when im not holding on by the full jaw of the chuck, and i certainly wouldnt run those feeds/speeds on small diameter work.

    Some materials are more forgiving than others and if you cant get coolant right where you need it, things can change in a hurry.

    So like i said , basically follow the insert guidelines and remember that those are under perfect conditions, and you need to adjust from there.

    David.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    And most likely the only thing this guy has cut is his toe nails...
    Have you ever CUT METAL??? worked in a Shop?? Served an APPRENTICESHIP????........ yada yada....
    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    Come on Gary , give the lad a break, he is using his experience? blah blah...........
    Crap guys...... ain't no slack for nobody, huh?

    You all don't know him, how can you toss the judgement up front? Sound like grumpy old farts to me.

    In my case, I personally had 6 years in a shop, lots of experience with several things. What CNC experience I had was on a prototrak and self taught. I switched jobs and worked with a couple guys that knew what they were doing on the CNCs, so it was a whole new game. I asked the main CNC guy if there was a way to calculate speeds and such. I was use to guessing going by how it felt to me for 6 years of mostly manual machining. He was happy to help and gave me a straight up answer, not like some grumpy dried up old pecker

    Quote Originally Posted by camscan View Post
    here we go again........ Fast is not in the least bit important, how many you have made at the end of the day is
    Actually, quality is far more important that quantity, or so many may agree.

    Quote Originally Posted by stephon0913 View Post
    hello all i want to ask a question to some ppl that will be able to answer this question once and for all. does anyone know of a good reference guide or chart for speed and feed rates based on tooling and material??? also i wanted to know what everyone uses for this. most the time i start out with an experienced guess and go from there. theoretically i would like a chart or grid that i look at that would tell me the max speed and feed i can use for the tool and material combonation, or better yet when i choose the tool in mastercam it already loads it for me. any help on this is greatly appreciated!
    The only chart you need is a calculator.

    Several years ago I was told, on steel:

    100 SFM for high speed steel
    200 SFM for plain carbide

    I find with HSS, on tool steels and such, maybe as low as 80 SFM, mild steels, maybe as much as 120 SFM or so. Carbide can often run more than 200 SFM. Coated carbides might go for 300-600 SFM, you really just need to look for manufactures specs.

    If you ask me, on aluminum, it's pretty much whatever the machine can handle. You can run 1000+ SFM easy with HSS endmills.

    but you don't necessarily have to go as high as any of these speeds, or be constrained by them. Keep in mind that this is best with flood coolant.

    To calculate RPM:

    RPM=(3.82*SFM)/DIAMETER

    say 1/2" HSS endmil on mild steel

    (3.82)*(100)/(.5)= 764 RPM

    Feeds are hard to be straight forward, way to many variables. It can range from less than .0005" per flute to more than .010" per flute. It is easy to start with around .002" per flute.

    Calculate as:

    FEED=(RPM)*(# of flutes)*(FEED PER FLUTE)

    Say from the above speed....

    (750)*(4)*(.002) = 6 IPM

    And that should be fairly mild. And these are better for less than 50% width of cut.

    But keep in mind that there are MANY variables. Spindle HP, machine rigidity, tool quality, coolant quality and depth of cut, width of cut. If spindle RPMs high and HP is low, cutting .008" per flute can turn into .012" per flute real quick as it bogs, and gets worse till it backs up on max torque or stalls.

    Cutting full width you will likely need to back off a bit. Cutting deep you sure might need to. But these should get you a starting point. All just depends on machine, tool and material.

    If you tell me this is on some little POS benchtop mill, I'll ringe your neck for wasting my time and tell you to burn it and throw it out in scrap. Just because they are shit and makes these calculations useless. Cause even a beat to piss, neglected, worn out 40yr old bridgeport still be 10x better than a worthless little benchtop

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    couldnt agree more .....grumpy old engineers that want to sit shooting people down should stay off this forum if there not going to help . we all start somewhere and get better with experience and HELP

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Colongioli View Post
    Well your best bet is the insert guidelines........... David.
    Crap, I just assumed he was looking at milling, you talking lathe?

    Sorry if I missed something

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    Quote Originally Posted by annoying View Post
    Crap, I just assumed he was looking at milling, you talking lathe?

    Sorry if I missed something

    It's ok man......you get an "A" for effort just the same!

    Nicely done.


    Later,
    Russ

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    OK, for those that call out ''Grumpy old men'' perhaps you don't know what a contentious issue speed and feed ''charts'' can be.

    Yes of course there are guidelines, but they are only that, a guide, most of the time, getting the best results is down to experience plus basic knowledge of the principles of metal cutting.

    And no, us '' Grumpy Old Farts'' don't always get it right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    OK, for those that call out ''Grumpy old men'' perhaps you don't know what a contentious issue speed and feed ''charts'' can be.

    Yes of course there are guidelines, but they are only that, a guide, most of the time, getting the best results is down to experience plus basic knowledge of the principles of metal cutting.

    And no, us '' Grumpy Old Farts'' don't always get it right.
    Thats a better answer ! more helpful and constructive

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    Use the manufacturer's speed/feed data as a starting point. Work from the low-end to high, dependent on the depth of cut.

    Probably more useful than anything when you're trying to set a starting point, especially if you don't have a lot of experience.

    My personal experience tells me that there is no set "answer" to this. A test is always worth a million theories, regardless the number crunching involved because there are just too many variables involved.

    To give you an idea... we have two fairly identical machines in our shop, one being a Makino with HSK40 tooling, the other a Roeders. One likes a 12mm 6-flute tool at one gage length, while the other is only stable with the exact same tool in a slightly longer holder when running the exact same parameters!

    We have had to develop two separate ranges of cutting parameters for these machines. Point being... there's a lot more to this than the tool and the workpiece. Some people like 'statics' though... easier to wrap the head around I guess....

    GL

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    Well thanks for the mixed response sure shows the grumpy old machinists from the forward thinkers I'm just trying to get some info from people that have been doing this longer than I have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephon0913 View Post
    hello all i want to ask a question to some ppl that will be able to answer this question once and for all. does anyone know of a good reference guide or chart for speed and feed rates based on tooling and material???
    Nope.
    To many variables for a simple chart.
    As a simple example cutting 4140 with carbide.
    Optimal SFM will be between 200 and 2000 SFM and optimal chipload will be from .0005 to .040.

    You can nail down a tighter range if you restrict it to save full width slotting with 1/2 to 3/8 endmills with a TiN coating at 50% of dia. deep on 32Rc 4140 parts. 62Rc parts will need very different numbers.
    Even then end mill grind and helix angles will change the numbers.
    Then there is the machine itself...........
    On top of that what is right for you for life may be way different for somebody making 5 million parts a year in continuous 24/7 production.

    You learn by playing with pushing it or find a tool engineer that has busted up tons of stuff to help you. Even if you choose number two it will still be a guess.

    This is why manufactures specify wide ranges, we don't know all the parameters of your cut and how tooling costs per hour affect your hourly rate.
    The on-line calculators will give you a starting point.

    I wish I could say yes, my life would be so much easier if there was a simple answer here.
    After 35 years of testing tooling I still find things that send me back to the drawing board.
    Bob

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    That chart would be a mile long.

    One of the endmills I use for harder materials has like 9 recommended speeds based off the amount of engagement......for every different type of hard material. There is also increased chip load based on radial depth...


    On a side note: Guessing can be fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    OK, for those that call out ''Grumpy old men'' perhaps you don't know what a contentious issue speed and feed ''charts'' can be.

    Yes of course there are guidelines, but they are only that, a guide, most of the time, getting the best results is down to experience plus basic knowledge of the principles of metal cutting.

    And no, us '' Grumpy Old Farts'' don't always get it right.
    Well, I started on my post before yours was posted.

    I just thought the the whole purpose is sharing ideas and experiences and giving/receiving guidance. And some venting of course. Heck, take those elements away and all that is left is gossip. Be a bunch of clueless women and girls on here then.

    lots of good knowledge on here though. I sure got some valuable help from schniedermachine a couple years ago.

    Don't get me wrong, it's fun to read some of the BS on here too. I just thought guys was looking for help, not insult or criticism

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    Run err as fast and hard till she breaks or burns up

    Adjust speed and feed accordingly

    When you stop smoking tooling, tossing parts off the table, and breaking shit you've found the acceptable speeds and feeds of a particular setup, machine, and tool.

    After awhile you'll be able to make some wiser decisions based on experience.

    Nobody ever learned nothin by not cooking a tool or two.

    Thats the speech I got when I first started in a machine shop, apparently this is the first your hearing it

    Horsepower/Torque at the tool, Setup rigidity, Length of tool, runout, etc, etc, etc are all going to fuck with whats on this magical chart you want.

    As far as MFG guidelines/recommendations: Always start at the high end and work your way down. Chances are 90% of the time the high end won't ever work, but you'll be happy the few times it does

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