Doosan LEO1600 lathe
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    Question Doosan LEO1600 lathe

    Hi Guys,

    At the moment i'm looking at getting another new CNC lathe - nothing fancy just a basic 2-axis with a tailstock. I just wondered if there was anyone on here who had one of these little lathes in their shop and could comment on how they are finding it, good or bad? Pricing on them seems pretty sharp.

    Particularly interested to know what you think about the tailstock design, function, and access to it, as that is something that will possibly end up being moved back and forth a bit for setups, and in the pics i have seen it may be a little crammed for access in there??

    Lathe is set to feature the newer Fanuc Oi-Plus control (or whatever is after Oi-TF now), 8 station turret, and I will probably set it up with a manual chuck for the one-off, two-off and special setups that it's likely to be used for, not production. (i.e. no parts catcher or bar feeder, etc.)

    Thanks in advance,
    Dean.

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    Doosan Lynx 2100 is the basic 2 axis lathe. I'm a bit biased as I used to work for them. Last I looked, it's a 12 station turret, either 6 or 8 in chuck and tail stock. Fanuc 0i-T Plus control is now standard and coming into the field, I think that few, if any, are left with the 0i-TF in the warehouse. You could use a manual chuck, but MAKE SURE it is rated for the RPMS the machine can spit out. If not, you MUST make sure that a G50 Sxxxx speed clamp is used to limit the spindle speed. BAD things can happen otherwise.

    The machine is well equipped as it is, and will give you many years of great service. Let me know if I can be of help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DouglasJRizzo View Post
    Doosan Lynx 2100 is the basic 2 axis lathe. I'm a bit biased as I used to work for them. Last I looked, it's a 12 station turret, either 6 or 8 in chuck and tail stock. Fanuc 0i-T Plus control is now standard and coming into the field, I think that few, if any, are left with the 0i-TF in the warehouse. You could use a manual chuck, but MAKE SURE it is rated for the RPMS the machine can spit out. If not, you MUST make sure that a G50 Sxxxx speed clamp is used to limit the spindle speed. BAD things can happen otherwise.

    The machine is well equipped as it is, and will give you many years of great service. Let me know if I can be of help.
    Thanks Douglas.

    Single Turret Two-Axis Horizontal | Doosan Machine Tools

    Machine specs attached, I think they came out in 2018 ??

    Yes, i'm aware about the G50 spindle clamp requirement to be on the safe side. Most of the better quality solid steel manual chucks available in the 6-8 inch diameter size seem to be rated to about 3500 RPM, which is pretty close to the max rated 4000 RPM of the machine anyway. But in reality for the stuff i'm doing it's usually never going to be run much over 2000 RPM.

    Thanks, Dean.

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    The LEO machine is not a Lynx. Be careful to not confuse the two. The LEO is targeted at the education market as is the DEM. I hesitate to use the term "stripped down" but they are not as capable as the fully grown Lynx and Pumas.

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    Locknut is correct. The LEO is the "Lynx Educational" machine. It does not have some of the things the regular Lynx has.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LockNut View Post
    The LEO machine is not a Lynx. Be careful to not confuse the two. The LEO is targeted at the education market as is the DEM. I hesitate to use the term "stripped down" but they are not as capable as the fully grown Lynx and Pumas.
    Thanks for the reply. So what are the 'shortcomings' that you allude to? I realise it's a small linear-way machine, and i have something similar here already which is more than adequate for the work that i do. ( i.e. small parts, fairly light duty cutting, not doing hardcore large hole drilling or trying to do big cuts on tough to machine materials.) The ability to produce small, accurate and consistent parts or small machining operations done accurately is more important to me.

    I almost bought a Hass TL2 until I found out how bad their encoder resolution or potential accuracy was going to be (i.e. 0.0002" to 0.0004" in Z, and 0.0004" to 0.0008" in the X (on diameters), so - apart from some other issues with the due diligence process for that machine - that was the deal breaker for that one. The price for Haas down here is also a bit over the top, compared with other offerings in the market here.

    Just figured that with the little Doosan if it's using one of the latest Fanuc controllers, along with fanuc drives and encoders, then it should be capable of doing accurate work, similar to or better than the current Korean/Fanuc small lathe that i have in the shop here, and that machine has been awesome value and a great asset for the money. I would buy another one of those, but there are a few new features and layout/spindle differences with the LEO1600 Doosan which make it a good contender for the next small machine here.

    Can you elaborate on what the other machines (Lynx/Puma) can do that this one shouldn't be used for?

    Thanks, Dean.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi 'smith Dean View Post
    Thanks for the reply. So what are the 'shortcomings' that you allude to? I realise it's a small linear-way machine, and i have something similar here already which is more than adequate for the work that i do. ( i.e. small parts, fairly light duty cutting, not doing hardcore large hole drilling or trying to do big cuts on tough to machine materials.) The ability to produce small, accurate and consistent parts or small machining operations done accurately is more important to me.

    I almost bought a Hass TL2 until I found out how bad their encoder resolution or potential accuracy was going to be (i.e. 0.0002" to 0.0004" in Z, and 0.0004" to 0.0008" in the X (on diameters), so - apart from some other issues with the due diligence process for that machine - that was the deal breaker for that one. The price for Haas down here is also a bit over the top, compared with other offerings in the market here.

    Just figured that with the little Doosan if it's using one of the latest Fanuc controllers, along with fanuc drives and encoders, then it should be capable of doing accurate work, similar to or better than the current Korean/Fanuc small lathe that i have in the shop here, and that machine has been awesome value and a great asset for the money. I would buy another one of those, but there are a few new features and layout/spindle differences with the LEO1600 Doosan which make it a good contender for the next small machine here.

    Can you elaborate on what the other machines (Lynx/Puma) can do that this one shouldn't be used for?

    Thanks, Dean.

    Hello Dean,
    The LEO is a small, capable turning center but consider it an entry level machine. 4000 RPM max, 6 inch chuck and only 8 tools. More than adequate for a lot of work. But to get it to a certain price point, the control probably lacks a few of the Fanuc options that would make it onto it's bigger brothers in the Lynx family. I don't have thos dofferences in hand at the moment. Here is a youtube video that might give you some insight.

    LEO 1600 series_demo cutting - YouTube

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    Franklin Performance in Hawkes bay have one with a bar feeder, they may be able to help you out with questions, sort of close to you, well same island anyway.

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    How much less $ is it thank a lynx 2100A? the lynx's are a really good deal usually. No need for the chip conveyor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    How much less $ is it thank a lynx 2100A? the lynx's are a really good deal usually. No need for the chip conveyor.
    ALOT cheaper, by a significant amount. Obviously you would need to contact your local rep for what the prices are over there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by srp61 View Post
    Franklin Performance in Hawkes bay have one with a bar feeder, they may be able to help you out with questions, sort of close to you, well same island anyway.
    Cheers, i called him. Seems pretty happy with it for the stuff they are doing with it. Sounds like they have done pretty big hours on it already over the past year or so that they have had it in their shop.

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    I work for Doosan in the US. This machine is aimed at education and entry level shops. Get with your dealer and find out ALL of the options it comes with. It's still new enough here, that I don't have full specs for it. I would hate to see someone outgrow this machine in short order and be sorry about the purchase. It might eventually NOT do things you might want it to do. Asking here is not the wisest path to this important info. All I am saying is choose wisely.

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