Easy one. How to take care of files...and then some more....
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  1. #1
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    Default Easy one. How to take care of files...and then some more....

    Hey all,
    I dont know much about much so excuse me: Just bought some metal files, not the super good ones fyi, and have been clogging up on stainless steel work.

    Looked up how to care for files and 50% said use a file card, 50% said dont. Some said use acid, some said dont. I say I understand, and then I say I dont.

    The stainless is just gumming up my file in 2 hours ( 10 parts time). Kinda heavy filing. Used to be for groove walls and threads, fixed that, just for thread now. Im getting a gnarly burr on the first imperfect thread on stainless. Tried angular infeed (G76 @ P000060) but bad stuff happened and same burr. Tried spring pass(es) but no help.

    Is this burr on first thread always there?? Aside from blunt/hygbee, what can be done??

    Thanks all,
    SML

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    Get some chalk and load them.

    Google chalk and files for further details.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

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    Rather than focus on the file, look for the cause of the burr. Did you chamfer the end first? Under normal conditions you will get a kind of a fin for the first thread. Can you knock that down with a wire wheel or tumbling?

    Tom

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    There are a few techniques to minimize the sharp first Thread. NOTICE; I used the word "minimize", there isn't a way to just not have it.

    You could Turn the OD, Thread the OD, then run a spring pass with the Turning Tool. (some people run the Threading Tool again after this).
    You can use the Threading Tool itself and run it up against the first Thread.
    You could Thread the OD then Turn the OD from Back to Front.

    There are a few ways, but usually a File is the best. I have never heard of something saying "not" to use a file card. I use a file card, and every once a couple Months ®M1 oil or ®3in1 oil.

    The Higbee Thread start is not burr free. <that's a period. It just removes the first imperfect Thread, then you still need to remove the burrs.

    R

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    What grade of stainless? Stainless is hard on files, you do not use chalk on stainless or hard metals. You only use chalk on soft metals, aluminum etc, at least I do. Put a chamfer at the beginning of thread as stated above as well, run some sand paper and or non woven abrasive over it.

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    Instead of a file I use a 2" dia.x 1/4" med. grade scotch-brite unitized wheel on a air die grinder to knock off thread start/end burrs. while part is still in lathe spinning.

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    I like to run the spindle in reverse and hit it with a piece of scotch-brite if I'm getting a burr.

    @ ^^^ beat me to it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmlG54 View Post
    Hey all,
    I dont know much about much so excuse me: Just bought some metal files, not the super good ones fyi, and have been clogging up on stainless steel work.

    Looked up how to care for files and 50% said use a file card, 50% said dont. Some said use acid, some said dont. I say I understand, and then I say I dont.

    The stainless is just gumming up my file in 2 hours ( 10 parts time). Kinda heavy filing. Used to be for groove walls and threads, fixed that, just for thread now. Im getting a gnarly burr on the first imperfect thread on stainless. Tried angular infeed (G76 @ P000060) but bad stuff happened and same burr. Tried spring pass(es) but no help.

    Is this burr on first thread always there?? Aside from blunt/hygbee, what can be done??

    Thanks all,
    SML

    I would say - YES - that burr is always there - depending on the material.

    To minimize it - changing your chamfer angle to 30* will help.

    Otherwise, the Higbie is a good option if need be.


    My file card is on the other end of my snag grinder.


    ----------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    Rather than focus on the file, look for the cause of the burr. Did you chamfer the end first? Under normal conditions you will get a kind of a fin for the first thread. Can you knock that down with a wire wheel or tumbling?

    Tom
    Yes, have a 45deg chamfer. I was recently told that if the chamfer "starts" below where thread "end" meaning dia of chamfer is smaller that minor dia of thread (OD), then that will help prevent a large burr.

    I am getting the fin and its just super sharp and takes about 1min or so to deburr. Trying to eliminate that if possible: Does not sound like it. No biggie, just checking to see if there was anything to be done.

    As for the files and to the rest. Thanks, I did see much about the chalk and oiling every once in a while. Also, and I think I like this one but havent tried it just yet is to use a piece of COPPER and it will help remove buildup from file teeth. Gotta try it. I'll let yall know how it works, or try it on your end.

    Thanks -SML

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    I've never seen a file in a CNC lathe toolholder......

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I've never seen a file in a CNC lathe toolholder......

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    Re-bump the chamfer a nats deeper with a sharp ground edge insert, honed edges, chamfers and threads just make burrs in high toughness ductile materials.

    Even a garden variety bit of hand ground and lapped cobalt HSS will work really well at this. If you can reverse the spindle and run it the other way up even better, so it cuts into the thread. Slow RPM slow feed, but it only needs cut a couple of thou so cycle time is but seconds.

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    You got your help on files. I spent my first 6 months in a machine shop on the bur bench. I would avoid deburring by hand if possible. Have you tried retracing the outside chamfer with whatever tool put the chamfer originally? A customer that I was turning "J" bolts from commercial Allen screws told me that you get less burs when turning from the outside in. He was right, not sure why.
    Use the same points but start from the OD.
    If that pushes the "fin" into the threads take a cleanup pass with the threading tool.

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    Have you tried tumbling? That won't take of the burr but it will blunt it.

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I've never seen a file in a CNC lathe toolholder......
    No, I use Microsoft.

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    RPM (SFM) should be very slow when using a file. I see lots of guys put a file to a 2" part spinning 500+ RPM. Best way to kill a file that I know.

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    Soak the files in vinagar a few days that’ll help clean em up

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    You got your help on files. I spent my first 6 months in a machine shop on the bur bench. I would avoid deburring by hand if possible. Have you tried retracing the outside chamfer with whatever tool put the chamfer originally? A customer that I was turning "J" bolts from commercial Allen screws told me that you get less burs when turning from the outside in. He was right, not sure why.
    Use the same points but start from the OD.
    If that pushes the "fin" into the threads take a cleanup pass with the threading tool.
    That sounds like a really cool idea. I did think of retracing with OD tool but figured fin WOULD get pushed into threads. But that combined with a clean up pass sounds like we might be onto something.

    Thanks all.

    Sparky, yeah, i was filing not at 500 but maybe a little too fast. I'll slow it down.

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    Hey all,

    What FredC and Littlerob suggested kicks some burr. Turn, thread, rerun chamfer turning, and then rerun threading: works like a charm.
    I decided on turn, thread, quickly file just break fin (This also allows me to run file backwards) then spring pass on thread. Add a touch of emery cloth at the end and voila, super nice threads. Awesome suggestions and awesome results.

    If anyone else wants to refine the thread deburr process, I definitely think this approach is the way to go.

    Thanks all.

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