Grooving stainless steel 304. I know, more stainless... - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradleyk View Post
    Besides tooling, Sandvik has some great technical information on their website. Even if you choose to stay with whatever company's tooling you like the technical information in the link is still applicable.
    External grooving
    I just checked out that link. Very good info indeed!! Thank you sharing.


    Alright all I think the troubleshooting is over. Wanted to post final results:

    Facts: 8" long 3" od, .250" wall 304 stainless tubing. Chucked 2.5" Op: grooving .3 wide .1 deep using .094" tool flo GP50C grade.
    groove is located 1" back from front of part so far away from chuck.
    SFM 100 for first pass at .002/rev sfm for remaining 150 at .002/rev. Starting in center with .025 pecking and work outward.

    Things are going great. Insert has held up integrity for 20parts and counting now. silent cutting pretty much, no chatter. A little rub on finish pass but one little polish with sandpaper and super clean. Im very happy with the way parts are coming out and how the insert has gone from chipping/breaking after 2 parts to doing damn near perfect up to 20.

    Thanks to all who have helped and contributed. Much appreciated and hopefully someone else can take something out of this. Thanks again. -SML

  2. #42
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    It's always nice to see the follow-up as well. Thanks for that.

  3. #43
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    Thanks Sparky. Everything you said was dead nuts. I appreciate the help. Till next time.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmlG54 View Post
    ...a situation where things have been run "just fine" before and encountering all these issues.
    Probably the last guy doing the job that "wasn't having any problems", WAS, but was too bull-headed to admit it so was compensating by polishing the hell out of it (and taking way too long doing so). He was probably going through inserts faster than he should have too. The "higher ups" never knew because he was so good at covering up shitty work and lack of knowledge.

    I think that your "meddling" with trying to get it right is the correct way to go about things. This is not the easy road, and few will thank you for going down it. But if you persevere, the right people will see it and start trusting you to take care of things. If not, it's time to mosey on down the road to the next shop...

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky961 View Post
    Probably the last guy doing the job that "wasn't having any problems", WAS, but was too bull-headed to admit it so was compensating by polishing the hell out of it (and taking way too long doing so). He was probably going through inserts faster than he should have too. The "higher ups" never knew because he was so good at covering up shitty work and lack of knowledge.

    I think that your "meddling" with trying to get it right is the correct way to go about things. This is not the easy road, and few will thank you for going down it. But if you persevere, the right people will see it and start trusting you to take care of things. If not, it's time to mosey on down the road to the next shop...
    You are right. I do believe some, borderline most, people are looking to just get the job done and are willing to "live" with some of the issues and work around them. And for some applications, that may be correct. It might not be worth the money to troubleshoot. If you make a batch of low quantity, then yeah, maybe dont reinvent the wheel and save on the man hours to just get it done. We run hundreds and hundreds in a year from what I am seeing and that is DEFINITELY worth the 4 hours or day or whatever to fix the problem for the long haul.

    New to job, the boss is a good and very smart guy, but yes, I do agree: If the value is not seen or appreciated or your attempts at bettering a situation are stifled too often, move on to a place of appreciation.


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