A hard lesso about gravity, impatient riggers, and unfixed axis's (Dropped machine) - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 45 of 45
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    463
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    971
    Likes (Received)
    272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by claya View Post
    Here is the thing. You will never EVER let that happen again. You WILL be at the other shop an hour+ before the riggers get there. You WILL direct and approve every action during the load and unloading. It is YOUR machine, and money paying them. If the Rigger does not allow you to have control, then you send them packing. It may cost you to send them away, but that will be less than this disaster cost you.

    If you start to get the uneasy feeling with what a rigger is doing, you stop them. You have skin in the game. They do not. It always takes longer to do things right. It takes a couple seconds for things to go really wrong.

    We learn the most from failure.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    I used to think that... as I actually have professional experience picking and skating heavy loads..
    But IF something goes sideways and YOU were barking orders..Well pray nobody gets hurt.

    Easily said, but just get the most recommended in your area and a copy of their liability insurance A DAY before they show up.
    Forget the price, the difference wont matter.

    I had a new VF4 delivered. Good company but head rigger that day was a asshole and having a bad day. Only fork they had large enough had to be broke down and forks tilted down to transport.
    To reassemble you had to put 2 4inchish pins back in. He was screaming at a kid to stick his hand in the hole to see why the pin would not go in
    I lost it.
    Jesus Crist how do people that stupid make it through at all

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    california
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    24

    Default

    Point is, the riggers are there on your behalf. Let them do thier job, but you have final approval of each step. It is YOUR equipment, not theirs. If you are very uncomfortable with something/anything, they stop until it is made right to your satisfaction. If the trust is not there, its only going to get worse. In my experience anyway. Others have done this a lot more than I have.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  3. Likes Cycle1000 liked this post
  4. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    297
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    33
    Likes (Received)
    90

    Default

    Whenever you have someone at your place doing work, or you go to theirs, you need to have a Pre-job Brief. They took it too far at a big company I worked for, but it’s a good thing when done reasonably. Have a 5 minute huddle with all their guys and all yours. Let everyone know that your on the same team, walk down the site, reiterate “anyone can say STOP”, cover any issues you foresee and go over the lift so everyone is on the same page. Forces a pause and refocus, focuses on safety, also shows your the boss and should be taken seriously. Many reason this will work in your favor. There are forms I’m sure online with prejob brief outlines if you need a guide.

    Nonetheless, very sorry for your misfortune and I hope it never happens to you again.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    What pisses me off is ALL the so-called “professionals” are always wanting to take short cuts!

    Whether it be concrete work, remodeling work, electrical work, rigging, or whatever, all these people seem to want to get the job done in the shortest amount of time possible. Which is obviously a goal, but the real goal (since they are supposed to be experienced and professional after all), is to get the job done RIGHT.

    I would just about rather chew off my own fingers than deal with a bunch of self-appointed “professionals.”

    I don’t claim to be the best CNC machinist, the fastest, or the cheapest, but I do have 35 years of experience in this shit, and when I accept a job from a customer, the parts go out the door of my shop per print, period.

    ToolCat
    respect! Agreed a job well done is the ultimate reward for any tradesman.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vmipacman View Post
    Whenever you have someone at your place doing work, or you go to theirs, you need to have a Pre-job Brief. They took it too far at a big company I worked for, but it’s a good thing when done reasonably. Have a 5 minute huddle with all their guys and all yours. Let everyone know that your on the same team, walk down the site, reiterate “anyone can say STOP”, cover any issues you foresee and go over the lift so everyone is on the same page. Forces a pause and refocus, focuses on safety, also shows your the boss and should be taken seriously. Many reason this will work in your favor. There are forms I’m sure online with prejob brief outlines if you need a guide.

    Nonetheless, very sorry for your misfortune and I hope it never happens to you again.
    I like that. its sometimes how you word things more then what you do that makes a venture successful.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •