Hardinge Superslant Troubleshooting
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    Question Hardinge Superslant Troubleshooting

    Hello,
    I am new to the forum here and was hoping for some help. I recently acquired a Hardinge Superslant 3 axis turning center with a General Numeric GN6TC controller. I know nothing about this dinosaur and cant find much about it online. I don't have any manuals with the machine and have had no luck getting them from Hardinge. I know very little about the history of the machine other than it was supposedly taken out of service 2 years ago and sold as part of a lot of machines. I recently bought it from the guy that bought the lot of machines (the others being manual machines)since he doesn't know anything about cnc (more of a fab shop).

    When I power up the machine it says SYSTEM ERROR (TOOL POST 1) 910
    Sometimes when powered up the CRT will loose horizontal sync, sometime it locks back in, other times it doesn't.
    I could be very wrong but don't believe the 910 to be a Fanuc RAM parity error (low byte) because the 4 LEDs on the PC board show flashing, off, off, off which should indicate faulty RAMs have NOT been detected. It shows nothing before the system error (will include a pic of the screen) and no combination of keys seems to do anything. I do have a couple original pages that were in the controller cabinet that has the gn 6t parameter table tur1 and tur2.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Paul
    Last edited by Hardplates; 05-14-2019 at 05:31 AM.

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    Hardinge Superslant GNC Turning Center CNC Lathe Manual | eBay

    User manual ^^^ but may not have deeper trouble shooting.

    HARDINGE SUPER SLANT LATHE MANUALS | eBay

    ^^^ this would have been good but shows deeper sections. (sold).


    http://www.hardingeservice.com/usr/S...09500-0033.pdf

    This hacks through their online service channel ^^^ Parts list. Maybe a Hardinge service engineer can do you a solid for cleaner download trouble shooting + maintenance section.


    Seems to be a popular retrofit/ good iron.

    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________

    @hardplates you attachment link appears to be dead...

    Seems "peeps" on the c....n....c Z0N3 dot something have a lot of experience retrofitting these ~ ish.

    I gotta admit that machine does have a cool retro "vibe" / restoration vibe about it. The control looks like fun.

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    img_20190513_124035983.jpg

    Here is the pic of the screen I tried attaching previously.

    Thank you for your response. I agree that it seams like great iron. Weighing over 5 tons and being an 8" x16" machine I expect it to be pretty stout. I am hellbent on reviving the controller and see no need to do a retrofit being how simple of g code it will be running. Its not like I'm trying to do trochoidal milling with live tooling.

    Any other help would be greatly appreciated.

    Paul

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    I know nothing about that machine or controller. That being said the first thing I would do is clean all cable connections with contact cleaner plus all the main boards and daughter card connections. Also look for blown fuses and tripped resets. A machine can even have left it's last location running and arrived alarmed out because of a loose or dirty connection aggravated by being moved. Bad connections can also throw up alarms that can throw your diagnosis off track. I once a a Z-axis encoder connection get damp from coolant, the machine was throwing up a bunch of x & z axis alarms.

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    The General Numeric GN6TC control is just a re-labeled Fanuc 6T. Typically rock solid and very good in the day.

    There is a very high likelihood that your trouble is from a bad power supply. With age, the electrolytic capacitors go bad. One of their primary functions is to filter line and switching noise.

    If you have skills to pull the power supply or supplies (could be more than one depending on machine builders choice and control configuration) and replace all the electrolytic caps you might get yourself going again for very little money. The alternative would be to go to someplace like TIE and order rebuilt power supplies. Far more costly than DIY, but sometimes you gotta go what you gotta do.

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    I am now beginning to think it is a RAM error as there are 2 main PCBs, o e for each turret which would explain why it says tool post 1 on the error. And it appears one if the high byte packages has been replaced in the past on the turret 2 PCB which is telling me they may be prone to failure.

    I will clean all the contacts when I get back to the shop in a couple hours and check for the 56th time for any blown fuses.

    Thank you all so far for your responses.

    Paul

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    The General Numeric GN6TC control is just a re-labeled Fanuc 6T. Typically rock solid and very good in the day.

    There is a very high likelihood that your trouble is from a bad power supply. With age, the electrolytic capacitors go bad. One of their primary functions is to filter line and switching noise.

    If you have skills to pull the power supply or supplies (could be more than one depending on machine builders choice and control configuration) and replace all the electrolytic caps you might get yourself going again for very little money. The alternative would be to go to someplace like TIE and order rebuilt power supplies. Far more costly than DIY, but sometimes you gotta go what you gotta do.
    I checked some of the voltages with a meter and they were ok but I did not use a scope to see how clean the power is. What you say makes a lot of sense to me and could also explain the CRT going in and out of horizontal lock. I will start pulling and checking ESR on all the electrolytics when I get back to the shop. Thank you.

    Paul

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

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    img_20190513_124035983.jpg

    This is the only screen that comes up in the "original" configuration. Holding -. on power up does nothing. Also the LEDs on the board are flicker, off, off, off

    img_20190514_151725246.jpg


    This is with the main Boards for turret 1 and 2 swapped. Holding -. at startup works but only some functions work when you choose a number. Also the LEDs on both the I believe showed 3 on. I tried so many different configurations today I cant remember everything.



    img_20190515_130922440.jpg


    I believe this was with the ROM boards swapped.


    At one point with the original turret 1 board in place the relays were closing and the spindle cooling motor would come on as well as some of the keys would light up on the control panel. But I couldn't read the CRT (I believe I have the CRT fixed now.

    Now it is back to no relays closing and none of the keys on the control board light up.

    I checked the CAPS in the power supply and they were ok. Apparently it was rebuilt by Fanuc in 2002. There were 3 bad caps in the 12 volt power supply and I replaced them.


    If anyone could point me in the right direction I would greatly appreciate it.

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    Download PDF Fanuc 6T Maintenance Manual - CNC Manual

    ^^^ This is free Fanuc 6T - Model B Maintenance manual

    (not sure how close this is ?)… [NOTE: THIS IS NOT MY DAY JOB lol.].


    When this machine was new I was probably 5 or ten years old.

    Looking at a maintenance manual that starts off with many pages about a tape reader … I'm like … ("No... gotta be effing kidding me ?") … But reminds me of programming Texas instruments computers (as a kid but having programs stored on audio tape ). [Programming in BASIC / spaghetti western (we used to call it 'cuz of program structure destroying "GOTO " statements, but that didn't stop Bill Gates starting out in New Mexico. Later California with DOS "Dirty Operating System.". ).



    This download is 40 MB... Has good info about all kinds of trouble shooting and some clever stuff you can dooooo with an Oscilloscope.


    How far back does the 6T go ?

    There are definitely a few "Old" or "Older salts" lurking that could totally ace this.


    __________________________________________________ __________________________


    @Hardplates seems you have a good feel or knowledge for electronics...


    I'm thinking early 80's tech / ICs... Were the IC's in a FANUC control back then all TTL or was there any CMOS ? (for industrial) ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    I am now beginning to think it is a RAM error as there are 2 main PCBs, o e for each turret which would explain why it says tool post 1 on the error. And it appears one if the high byte packages has been replaced in the past on the turret 2 PCB which is telling me they may be prone to failure.

    I will clean all the contacts when I get back to the shop in a couple hours and check for the 56th time for any blown fuses.

    Thank you all so far for your responses.

    Paul

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
    Is it just me or does this board looks spookily clean / fresh and yet has relatively ancient (digital) electronics ? (80's)

    So this board has been stocked / replaced before ?


    @Hardplates do you have a budget for time and $ with this project that you would rather not cross ? (out of interest... you don't have to answer that.).

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    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    .......How far back does the 6T go ? ......
    The 6T A and 6M A version was released about 1980. Intel 8086 CPU with an 8087 math co-processor. CRT was optional.

    It has been about 25 years since I last worked on a 6 series control. If I get a bit of spare time I'll look at the maintenance manual and try to refresh myself on some of the system error troubleshooting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    Hello,<snip>

    When I power up the machine it says SYSTEM ERROR (TOOL POST 1) 910

    <snip.> [Edits added in square brackets ].

    I could be very wrong but don't believe the 910 to be a Fanuc RAM parity error (low byte)[…___>]

    because the 4 LEDs on the PC board show

    flashing, off, off, off [--->] which should indicate faulty RAMs have NOT been detected.


    It shows nothing before the system error (will include a pic of the screen)

    and no combination of keys seems to do anything.

    I do have a couple original pages that were in the controller cabinet that has the gn 6t parameter table tur1 and tur2.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Paul
    I'm wondering if you might have a sticky key. (as well).

    Ok 15 mins with the manual … ---> Seems like a pretty good manual, although some typos that point one to sections that aren't there lol... But I'm pretty impressed. The Japanglish is not too bad on this.


    Trying to follow you down the "Rabbit hole".

    Error 910 ---> RAM "Parity Error Low Byte" (directive) ---> "Change Master PCB" ( I assume change out and replace the whole board.).

    Then somehow one ends up in section 3.3.4

    If you have SOLID LED (not flashing) for LED 3 with LED 2, LED 1, LED 0 (off).

    i.e. O, X, X, X refers to "RAM Test of Number "0" (zero) Ram chip (low byte) Presumably top left hand chip on the board (main PCB). [Need to double check.].

    However


    One is directed to Appendix 14. (page 382) in this case regarding RAM tests that / RAM parity tests that the machine can perform.


    There's a very specific procedure that involves the "Start button".

    From the manual, (with emphasis added)

    Introduction

    When a RAM-associated alarm occurs, RAM testing displays the faulty RAM on the LED on the master PCB.
    Whether or not a RAM is normal, can also be diagnosed in IL-Mode after the power is turned on.

    2 Operation

    2.1 An alarm has occurred.

    i) Check LED master PCB display first of all. For the alarm sometimes is not displayed on the CRT screen,
    because of use of RAM.

    (See Fig. 1.)

    ii) Press the START button. The RAM test will begin.

    ° RAMs are under test (which takes approx, two seconds.)

    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = dark light (dimly lit ? ) , (2 and 1 and 0 all flicker)).


    o Faulty RAMs have been detected.


    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = Light (brightly I assume) (2, 1, 0 (as per figure 1 in manual)).


    o Faulty RAMs have not been detected.
    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = FLICKER ! , (2,1,0 are all off)).

    Then


    Press the START button. The test will be conducted again from the beginning of the RAMs.
    iii) Do not operate for purposes other than RAM test, until the power is turned off.

    2.2 RAM test is to be conducted after the power is turned on.

    i) Power on while pressing the [ - ] and | . | buttons. The following screen will be displayed.

    Then you get the following screen:

    ____________________

    IL-MODE

    1. TAPE
    2. MEMORY
    3. ENPANE
    4. BUBBLE
    5. PC-LOAD
    6. RAM TEST

    _____________________


    ii) Press the ["6" ] DATA key. The LEDs will flicker.
    ----> 3 2 1 0 (3 = flicker, 2 and 1 and 0 = off)

    iii) Press the | START | button. The sequence will enter into 2.1,ii

    iv) Press the | RESET | button. The sequence will be an ordinary software one.




    You can see the diagram and layout on page 383 for the Ram chips on the board (I'm guessing).

    __________________________________________________ ________________________________________________


    @Hardpalte following you this far down the rabbit hole I wonder if the "6" data key is sticky...

    (interesting what you did with swapping those other boards around).

    Kinda cute with the "Bubble memory board" and the " Character display control,
    I/O interface PCB
    " cards... And the "Resolver/inductosyn
    control circuit A20B-0008-0461Control ROM board"


    And wonder what happens if you follow through to get the IL-Mode screen


    and then proper close and reset sequence …


    _______________________________________________


    @Harplate seems that possibly being stuck in a loop due to a sticky key and a 1/2 completed sequence could give rise to some of what you are seeing... So I agree that the low byte "0" Ram may be fine and not be at fault and it may indeed be you don't need to replace the main board / PCB.


    I wonder if your "Character display control,I/O interface PCB " board isn't fritzed also / perhaps from what you say ? Wonder if you can get the IL- MODE screen ? Given that you said that the keys are not responsive ?

    Not clear on your two turret things and separate boards etc. for those.

    Also … What is supposed to go in those empty IC sockets ? Is that an option or did you pull the chips ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    Download PDF Fanuc 6T Maintenance Manual - CNC Manual

    ^^^ This is free Fanuc 6T - Model B Maintenance manual

    (not sure how close this is ?)… [NOTE: THIS IS NOT MY DAY JOB lol.].


    When this machine was new I was probably 5 or ten years old.

    Looking at a maintenance manual that starts off with many pages about a tape reader … I'm like … ("No... gotta be effing kidding me ?") … But reminds me of programming Texas instruments computers (as a kid but having programs stored on audio tape ). [Programming in BASIC / spaghetti western (we used to call it 'cuz of program structure destroying "GOTO " statements, but that didn't stop Bill Gates starting out in New Mexico. Later California with DOS "Dirty Operating System.". ).



    This download is 40 MB... Has good info about all kinds of trouble shooting and some clever stuff you can dooooo with an Oscilloscope.


    How far back does the 6T go ?

    There are definitely a few "Old" or "Older salts" lurking that could totally ace this.


    __________________________________________________ __________________________


    @Hardplates seems you have a good feel or knowledge for electronics...


    I'm thinking early 80's tech / ICs... Were the IC's in a FANUC control back then all TTL or was there any CMOS ? (for industrial) ?
    I have that manual and thanks to an unnamed person I have all the manuals for the machine now. I don't know a ton about electronics but can usually stumble my way through it and am not afraid of trying and learning.

    When I pulled the data sheet on the RAM ICs (hm6116p-3) it says CMOS but also says directly TTL compatible input/output.

    I believe this machine is a 85 or 86 so that would make me 1-3 years old when it was made.

    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    Is it just me or does this board looks spookily clean / fresh and yet has relatively ancient (digital) electronics ? (80's)

    So this board has been stocked / replaced before ?


    @Hardplates do you have a budget for time and $ with this project that you would rather not cross ? (out of interest... you don't have to answer that.).
    Thanks for taking the time to help.
    All of the boards look this clean, I'm assuming they were good about changing the filters on the cooling fans
    As far as a budget, I am a small one man shop so the answer is yesterday and free haha. In all seriousness I am far more willing to invest time than money


    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    The 6T A and 6M A version was released about 1980. Intel 8086 CPU with an 8087 math co-processor. CRT was optional.

    It has been about 25 years since I last worked on a 6 series control. If I get a bit of spare time I'll look at the maintenance manual and try to refresh myself on some of the system error troubleshooting.
    Thank you for taking an interest, I have been told that you really know your 6 series controls

    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    I'm wondering if you might have a sticky key. (as well).

    Ok 15 mins with the manual … ---> Seems like a pretty good manual, although some typos that point one to sections that aren't there lol... But I'm pretty impressed. The Japanglish is not too bad on this.


    Trying to follow you down the "Rabbit hole".

    Error 910 ---> RAM "Parity Error Low Byte" (directive) ---> "Change Master PCB" ( I assume change out and replace the whole board.).

    Then somehow one ends up in section 3.3.4

    If you have SOLID LED (not flashing) for LED 3 with LED 2, LED 1, LED 0 (off).

    i.e. O, X, X, X refers to "RAM Test of Number "0" (zero) Ram chip (low byte) Presumably top left hand chip on the board (main PCB). [Need to double check.].

    However


    One is directed to Appendix 14. (page 382) in this case regarding RAM tests that / RAM parity tests that the machine can perform.


    There's a very specific procedure that involves the "Start button".

    From the manual, (with emphasis added)

    Introduction

    When a RAM-associated alarm occurs, RAM testing displays the faulty RAM on the LED on the master PCB.
    Whether or not a RAM is normal, can also be diagnosed in IL-Mode after the power is turned on.

    2 Operation

    2.1 An alarm has occurred.

    i) Check LED master PCB display first of all. For the alarm sometimes is not displayed on the CRT screen,
    because of use of RAM.

    (See Fig. 1.)

    ii) Press the START button. The RAM test will begin.

    ° RAMs are under test (which takes approx, two seconds.)

    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = dark light (dimly lit ? ) , (2 and 1 and 0 all flicker)).


    o Faulty RAMs have been detected.


    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = Light (brightly I assume) (2, 1, 0 (as per figure 1 in manual)).


    o Faulty RAMs have not been detected.
    ---> 3 2 1 0 (3 = FLICKER ! , (2,1,0 are all off)).

    Then


    Press the START button. The test will be conducted again from the beginning of the RAMs.
    iii) Do not operate for purposes other than RAM test, until the power is turned off.

    2.2 RAM test is to be conducted after the power is turned on.

    i) Power on while pressing the [ - ] and | . | buttons. The following screen will be displayed.

    Then you get the following screen:

    ____________________

    IL-MODE

    1. TAPE
    2. MEMORY
    3. ENPANE
    4. BUBBLE
    5. PC-LOAD
    6. RAM TEST

    _____________________


    ii) Press the ["6" ] DATA key. The LEDs will flicker.
    ----> 3 2 1 0 (3 = flicker, 2 and 1 and 0 = off)

    iii) Press the | START | button. The sequence will enter into 2.1,ii

    iv) Press the | RESET | button. The sequence will be an ordinary software one.




    You can see the diagram and layout on page 383 for the Ram chips on the board (I'm guessing).

    __________________________________________________ ________________________________________________


    @Hardpalte following you this far down the rabbit hole I wonder if the "6" data key is sticky...

    (interesting what you did with swapping those other boards around).

    Kinda cute with the "Bubble memory board" and the " Character display control,
    I/O interface PCB
    " cards... And the "Resolver/inductosyn
    control circuit A20B-0008-0461Control ROM board"


    And wonder what happens if you follow through to get the IL-Mode screen


    and then proper close and reset sequence …


    _______________________________________________


    @Harplate seems that possibly being stuck in a loop due to a sticky key and a 1/2 completed sequence could give rise to some of what you are seeing... So I agree that the low byte "0" Ram may be fine and not be at fault and it may indeed be you don't need to replace the main board / PCB.


    I wonder if your "Character display control,I/O interface PCB " board isn't fritzed also / perhaps from what you say ? Wonder if you can get the IL- MODE screen ? Given that you said that the keys are not responsive ?

    Not clear on your two turret things and separate boards etc. for those.

    Also … What is supposed to go in those empty IC sockets ? Is that an option or did you pull the chips ?
    I did not pull the 28 dip ICs, there was nothing in the sockets when I got the machine......is there supposed to be something in there or is it for some option like you say?

    When I leave the original main board in place and power up it goes directly to the first screen pic I posted and will not enter IL mode. Although a couple of times in a row on power up relays would close and the control panel would partially light up but the screen was not readable. I have yet to be able to reproduce that condition.

    If I swap the main boards from turret 1 and 2 it will power up with the not ready screen (I believe it says slave ready and then bubble ready and then not ready, just going off memory)In this configuration it will enter IL mode and will allow me to enter defects for the bubble memory. If I press the number for PC (something) it shows other random 900 series alarms/faults. If I press the number for RAM test it seems to lock up and need to be turned off and on again. I have never worked with one of these controls so I'm not even sure what it is supposed to do when it is operating correctly.

    I would just like to thank everyone that has taken the time to help me. Hopefully we get it figured out and this thread can help someone in the future with a similar issue

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    I quoted and typed out a response to all the replies but for some reason it flashed up on the screen that it had to be approved by a moderator. I'm hoping it shows up soon and I don't have to remember and retype it haha

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    <snip>
    When I pulled the data sheet on the RAM ICs (hm6116p-3) it says CMOS but also says directly TTL compatible input/output.



    <snip>

    Thanks for taking the time to help.
    All of the boards look this clean, I'm assuming they were good about changing the filters on the cooling fans
    <snip>
    <snips various>

    I did not pull the 28 dip ICs, there was nothing in the sockets when I got the machine......is there supposed to be something in there or is it for some option like you say?

    <snip>

    If I swap the main boards from turret 1 and 2 it will power up with the not ready screen (I believe it says slave ready and then bubble ready and then not ready, just going off memory)In this configuration it will enter IL mode and will allow me to enter defects for the bubble memory. If I press the number for PC (something) it shows other random 900 series alarms/faults. If I press the number for RAM test it seems to lock up and need to be turned off and on again. I have never worked with one of these controls so I'm not even sure what it is supposed to do when it is operating correctly.

    I would just like to thank everyone that has taken the time to help me. Hopefully we get it figured out and this thread can help someone in the future with a similar issue

    Assuming that photo is of the RAM chip array... I've never heard of a 6 bit computer ? I don't know how you would multiplex that.

    There's a couple of intriguing clues.

    RAM parity - Wikipedia

    ^^^ Read section on RAM parity history.

    "Early computers sometimes required the use of parity RAM, and parity-checking could not be disabled. A parity error typically caused the machine to halt, with loss of unsaved data; this is usually a better option than saving corrupt data. Logic parity RAM, also known as fake parity RAM, is non-parity RAM that can be used in computers that require parity RAM. Logic parity RAM recalculates an always-valid parity bit each time a byte is read from memory, instead of storing the parity bit when the memory is written to; the calculated parity bit, which will not reveal if the data has been corrupted (hence the name "fake parity"), is presented to the parity-checking logic. It is a means of using cheaper 8-bit RAM in a system designed to use only 9-bit parity RAM.
    Memory errors[edit]

    In the 1970s-80s, RAM reliability was often less-than-perfect; in particular, the 4116 DRAMs which were an industry standard from 1975 to 1983 had a considerable failure rate as they used triple voltages (-5, +5, and +12) which resulted in high operating temperatures. By the mid-1980s, these had given way to single voltage DRAM such as the 4164 and 41256 with the result of improved reliability. However, RAM did not achieve modern standards of reliability until the 1990s. Since then errors have become less visible as simple parity RAM has fallen out of use; either they are invisible as they are not detected, or they are corrected invisibly with ECC RAM. Modern RAM is believed, with much justification, to be reliable, and error-detecting RAM has largely fallen out of use for non-critical applications. By the mid-1990s, most DRAM had dropped parity checking as manufacturers felt confident that it was no longer necessary. Some machines that support parity or ECC allow checking to be enabled or disabled in the BIOS, permitting cheaper non-parity RAM to be used. If parity RAM is used the chipset will usually use it to implement error correction, rather than halting the machine on a single-bit parity error. "



    Blah blah blah..

    What that means is for RAM parity checks one would need extra RAM chips (as redundant parity checkers to maintain data integrity...

    They say Chips that do the (-5, +5 and +12 V) "Thing" hence your CMOS and TTL compatibility (as RAM chips ) in general fail due to thermal issues.

    Theses redundant parity checkers became phased out by the 1990's as the RAM chips (in general) become more reliable and are based on CMOS only. I don't know how long FANUC hung onto TTL ? (But can be quite robust in some situations.).

    ----> Sooooooo, I suspect that board is newer than 1986 (I had had embarrassingly tall hair then and hair gel was a commodity traded on the stock market.).


    (no redundant parity RAM chips needed for 1990's 2000s ish board (I suspect) ).

    I agree / sounds like there are HIGH-Bit RAM chip failures on the other unit

    And... consequently the SOCKETS are pre-designed to be there as FANUC knows that those need to be replaced … So rather than junking the whole board and having a quite pricey "Tear down" the service engineer would just replace those chips.

    (being an industrial control reliability is paramount and hence the parity checking options would have been switched on in the Fanuc equivalent of the 'BIOS" . So could beeee that the extra "fake" parity checking required real time causes those high bit RAM chips to run consistently hotter and hence need to be replaced on a more regular basis. They just fail from cooking themselves. ).

    __________________________________________________ _____________________________


    @Hardplates I wonder if those RAM chips have been pilfered for another machine ?


    __________________


    Intel 8086 - Wikipedia

    ^ 8 and 16 bit architecture of 8086
    ____


    Maybe ?
    (gotta doooo some real work today o'wise I'm up sh*t creek ! )


    LATER !

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    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    ......----> Sooooooo, I suspect that board is newer than 1986 ......
    I'm thinking it is older unless it is a replacement board for a failed original board. Even then I doubt that Fanuc would have changed much, if anything, from the last version of "production" boards.

    1986 was the last year of the 6 series. That was the B2 version of which I never saw in a lathe application, only mills. Had a color screen and graphic conversational mill programming capability.

    There may have been a lathe version, but by 1986 the 10TF had been available for a couple years and it too was a conversational programming capable lathe control. Would not make much sense to offer 2 products that overlapped capability that closely.

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    The RAM ICs are not in sockets, they are through hole soldered, but like you say there are 2 empty sockets but they are 28 DIP and the RAM ICs are 24 DIP. I believe the 2 smaller ICs to the right HM6167P are the parity??? Just a guess. It sounds like you know far more than I do about this type of circuitry

    ram.jpg

    It appears the PC MODEL B Card has its own RAM as well

    pc-b-ram.jpg

    I am looking back at the power supply and pins *PF and EN have +4.1 volts...….this could be correct but doesn't sound to me like its right. Anyone know what *PF and EN are and what they are supposed to be?

    power-sup.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    I'm thinking it is older unless it is a replacement board for a failed original board. Even then I doubt that Fanuc would have changed much, if anything, from the last version of "production" boards.

    1986 was the last year of the 6 series. That was the B2 version of which I never saw in a lathe application, only mills. Had a color screen and graphic conversational mill programming capability.

    There may have been a lathe version, but by 1986 the 10TF had been available for a couple years and it too was a conversational programming capable lathe control. Would not make much sense to offer 2 products that overlapped capability that closely.
    All the boards are dated 9-86

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    I'm thinking it is older unless it is a replacement board for a failed original board. Even then I doubt that Fanuc would have changed much, if anything, from the last version of "production" boards.

    1986 was the last year of the 6 series. That was the B2 version of which I never saw in a lathe application, only mills. Had a color screen and graphic conversational mill programming capability.

    There may have been a lathe version, but by 1986 the 10TF had been available for a couple years and it too was a conversational programming capable lathe control. Would not make much sense to offer 2 products that overlapped capability that closely.
    Yup that's what I mean a replacement board... (sorry for being imprecise) I.e. 1980-1983 technology/ "Vintage" with a board replacement in the late 1990's / 2000's

    I think Hardplates said there was some boards replaced in 2000 ?


    Clean looking board but one of those diodes looks "Crizzled" (shrugging shoulders.).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    The RAM ICs are not in sockets, they are through hole soldered, but like you say there are 2 empty sockets but they are 28 DIP and the RAM ICs are 24 DIP. I believe the 2 smaller ICs to the right HM6167P are the parity??? Just a guess. It sounds like you know far more than I do about this type of circuitry

    ram.jpg

    It appears the PC MODEL B Card has its own RAM as well

    pc-b-ram.jpg

    I am looking back at the power supply and pins *PF and EN have +4.1 volts...….this could be correct but doesn't sound to me like its right. Anyone know what *PF and EN are and what they are supposed to be?

    power-sup.jpg
    That looks like more 80's lol ;-) (original / in service ).

    Is the insulation on all the wiring sound etc. ? Still (not cracking or anything ?).

    So that RAM array is labeled, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7

    8 bit ?

    And you are missing 6 and 7...

    I can't really guess what FANUC had in mind and what deals and components were available to them at the time.



    If you look at the reverse side of the sockets are the seemingly redundant pins connected to anything ? … Does every pin have a copper track connected to it on the reverse side ? (To other components/ circuitry )


    If those RAM chips are necessary and need to be replaced a lot I'd design them as socketed as I wouldn't force a service engineer to solder and unsolder IC 's in close fitting difficult components… (more likely to mess up other IC trying to solder all these pins without messing up other ones.).

    There's someone out there that can go "DUDE … your chips are missing... Or FANUC T6 runs lovely just like that... (but doesn't seem to be running lovely and your 900 error codes are ALL RAM related ? ). And the control is being completely obstructive and random … trying to "Puke out" RAM errors... ? (maybe)


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