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  1. #1
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    Default Help translating German?

    image-118-.jpg

    Can anyone help with this drawing?
    I understand the tolerances and surface finish.
    I'm trying to find the material, heat treat and plating as well as any other notes that might be significant.
    Thanks!

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    I think I might help you out but the letters are not readable, at least for these old eyes. Sorry.
    fusker

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    Have you tried Google Translate?

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    Unless it's buried in the small print that I can't make out, or behind the redactions, I don't think there is a material callout.

    Regards.

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flash Gordon View Post
    image-118-.jpg

    Can anyone help with this drawing?
    I understand the tolerances and surface finish.
    I'm trying to find the material, heat treat and plating as well as any other notes that might be significant.
    Thanks!
    Claims to be a "Stop-block" for a 50 taper HAAS spindle.

    Bottom left box mainly concerns heat treatment rules / cautions.

    Basically saying that thin walled areas (through) hardening is not allowed.

    When applying hardening / "Application hardening" * (possibly case hardening) the following areas have to be covered to prevent "Charring" = carburization

    - "Pass spring" / Spring pass areas = Keyways...

    - Threads or threaded regions.

    - Thin walled areas being defined for wall thicknesses < 4 (degree) Eht <--- Not sure what that really means. 4th degree ?

    ____________________

    In the box / labeled for material it is left BLANK, but trying to find relevant DIN / ISO numbers for applicable steels ?

    2nd table / box from the left might have incomplete entries.

    So for Surface treatment it states - Without / None.

    And then in a slightly contradictory way [To the box on the far left (bottom) ] - says for Heat treatment - Without / None.

    Maybe the material leans more to ductile iron /(toughened steels) vs hardened tool steels ???



    ____________________


    If I am able to squint/ decipher / correct anything else I'll put it here : fixed Keyway and Carburization +*

    __________________________________________________ __________________________

    Sorry that's a little vague as my machining / German technical dictionary is in a box 400 miles away from where I am currently.

    Usual disclaimers apply for rando info on the forum / web.
    Last edited by cameraman; 01-24-2021 at 08:21 PM.

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    As mentioned, try Google Translate. You can use your phone camera to focus on the text and it will automatically show the translated text. It seems to go thru some iterations of context until it settles down, so I use it with caution.

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    Material is EN 1.7131, or DIN 16MnCr5, or your AISI 5S59, it is written in upper right corner...


    In lower right corner its written, according to Google translate:
    Heat treatment advice: Hardening of thin-walled areas is not permitted. During case hardening, the following areas must be protected against carburization by covering

    Thread of keyways

    Thin-walled areas with wall thicknesses <4 "Eht


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  9. #8
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    Technical German is a nightmare. It is a completely different language than spoken German and Google translate doesn't ever work. The vocabulary seems to be known only to tradesmen in that specific trade.I live here and I run into this dilemma daily. If you know the name in English, it often works to first translate to Dutch or Italian and then into German. On the original query, zone hardening in Europe is very popular, especially when using the DIN equivalent of 4140, but in this case I don't think the cautions relate to this part specifically and just generic. I see no call out for material or heat treatment or surface treatment. If it were me, I'd make it out of 4140 and be done with it.

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    Thanks to everyone! That gives me the info I need.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Technical German is a nightmare. It is a completely different language than spoken German and Google translate doesn't ever work. The vocabulary seems to be known only to tradesmen in that specific trade.I live here and I run into this dilemma daily. If you know the name in English, it often works to first translate to Dutch or Italian and then into German. On the original query, zone hardening in Europe is very popular, especially when using the DIN equivalent of 4140, but in this case I don't think the cautions relate to this part specifically and just generic. I see no call out for material or heat treatment or surface treatment. If it were me, I'd make it out of 4140 and be done with it.

    That was my impression too,[Generic boiler plate of cautions as you say ] @steve-l in the bottom left box / table (when you rotate the posted image anti-clockwise.). Good tip about mapping into Dutch or Italian first then cash-out in English.

    Kinda bummed I packed my old technical German to English machining book into box thinking "Well I'm not gonna need that for a while " lol.

    I'm still not seeing @Locker's "Material is EN 1.7131, or DIN 16MnCr5, or your AISI 5S59, it is written in upper right corner..."

    Maybe I squint at it later :-)

    I dare say the text that's been blacked out with magic marker could also be legible -


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